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Don't put Norris in the shed!

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AndyT

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My wife and I recently visited an old friend, whose father used to be a joiner.
When she moved house - only about six months ago - someone 'helpfully' put some of her father's old tools out in the garden shed. This was the sad sight I found there:







Fortunately, the Bristol Hospital for Rusty Planes had a vacancy, and Norris was taken in for treatment.

I'm pleased to report that he has made a complete recovery and now looks much healthier:









This was achieved with citric acid (only for the iron and cap iron), lighter fuel, Maas polish and Micromesh. (Thanks again for the product tips, Jim!). I was especially pleased that the original circular pattern of buffing was still ok under the rust:




This was the first time I have worked on a Norris, and I can see what the hype is about, even though this is a late production model with the stained beech woodwork. The precision and heft of the thing sets it apart.

Two little observations: the original owner knew all about getting the cap iron close to the cutting edge:



but he may have had trouble with the iron slipping - he'd glued a rim of fine sandpaper on the back:



So, now the plane is ready to go back - and this time, it will be staying in a nice dry house, where it will be a more fitting memento of its first owner.
 

Pete Maddex

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Hi, Andy

Nice job! that the second on I have seen with the engine turning, the other won was BNIB!.

Pete
 

woodbloke

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AndyT":2obd9amy said:
This was the first time I have worked on a Norris, and I can see what the hype is about, even though this is a late production model with the stained beech woodwork. The precision and heft of the thing sets it apart.
I have an A1 panel plane with stained beech woodwork...mine's never been left out in a cold, dark, damp and unfriendly shed though, but it's never used now as I much prefer the LV BU family of planes - Rob
 

Richard T

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Well rescued that man.

It's amazing how quickly rust spreads its evils - especially when it's caused by condensation.

I'm glad you got to have a play with it Andy and I can imagine what you mean -even a late model ...
 

Hardwood66

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I have a Norris but mine dosent have the round machine marks dose that mean its older model looks the same as yours but no round marks

Russ
 

AndyT

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I found this advert in a Feb 1951 copy of The Woodworker, which identifies this as a late model, confirms that the turned pattern was used at that time, and gives the price - £3 - 17s - 6d. Anyone know how many weeks' pay that would have been for a skilled tradesman?

 

jimi43

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As I read down your thread Andy...the things that went through my mind were.."that rust hasn't pitted yet...walk in the park...just rescued in time...couple of hours work"...that sort of thing!

And so you proved admirably!

Glad to see you have got to grips with MAAS polish. I have to say...not hyped stuff at all...it doesn't need to be...it's brilliant for "non-OTT" cleaning and preservation.

I don't do any abrasives for restoration other than MicroMesh...so controllable and the finish up to 12000M is good enough for lenses so it should be good enough for what we mere mortals do.

Go the whole hog and invest in some Renaissance Wax....that will then protect it forever if you keep renewing it every year or so.

I have to say..that iron came up beautifully!

Jim
 

RogerP

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AndyT":10tpckfu said:
I found this advert in a Feb 1951 copy of The Woodworker, which identifies this as a late model, confirms that the turned pattern was used at that time, and gives the price - £3 - 17s - 6d. Anyone know how many weeks' pay that would have been for a skilled tradesman?
Average UK weekly wage for 1951 £5.8s it says here http://www.whenwerewehappy.org.uk/pages/work1951.html
 
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