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creosote

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Joe Shmoe

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Is there much difference between traditional Creosote and the Creosote replacement you get now ?

Why was it banned, and realistically, what would happen if you coated your shed with it anyway ?

Does it smell worse or stay tacky for longer than the replacement stuff you get these days ?
 

Joe Shmoe

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Hi thanks. It was that thread that has me intereted in it.

One last question:

If you were to use traditional creosote on a shed, would it become sticky during hot weather and also leach out into nearby veg-patches and plants etc ?
 

Harbo

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I think the leaching out would be down to rainfall rather than heat - albeit over a long time.
The danger is that it can find itself into watercourses etc.
I am surprised that it is still being used by professionals - tars have been banned from highway construction for a long time and if found during remedial works have to removed to special tips.

Rod
 

wallace

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I used the replacement Creocote recently. Smells pretty much the same but doesn't burn the skin like the old stuff if you splash yourself. Dont know how good it is long term though.
 

Digit

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I can answer some of the questions, no, the new stuff does not do as good a job, it fades more rapidly and needs more frequent top ups.
Rain will wash the surface of the Creosote away if it is still wet when the rain occurrs, but not afterwards.
Creosote is basically Tar that is thinned with solvents. My house was built in 1938 in Canada, and with repeated applications of the real Mc Coy the timbers, are black with it right through.
Bear in mind that I live in one of the wettest parts of the UK.
Safety issues, I suspect more theoretical than real, the present regs were introduced by you know who!
Professionals still use it, as do I.
Loathe the smell though!

Roy.
 

Joe Shmoe

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cheers guys. But why do old timber railway-sleepers leach loads of thick black tar when it's a hot day? I though these were also treated with coal-tar creosote?
 

Digit

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Amongst other materials, yes, the idea of Creosote it that the solvent thins the Tar so that it can penetrate so over the years you do build up a level of Tar.
I think you'll find that sleepers were pressure treated with it.
My house cladding is nominally half inch thick and the Creosote has penetrated right through.

Roy.
 

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