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Calling all drum sander builders

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Gerard Scanlan

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I have almost finished my drum sander and I am wonderng about the best route to take for attaching the paper to the drum.
I have seen 4 variations.
1. spring clips on the ends of the drum
2. velcro around the drum (hook) and sanding paper with (loop) fluffy backing
3. a channel routed along the length of the drum with an insert that screws into place clamping down the paper
4. using adhesive to stick the paper down at each end (this is not necessarily very quick to do)

The velcro approach seems like a good idea, however the paper is more expensive and I am concerned that it might have a cushioning effect. Although this is not a problem on my random orbital sander.

Has any one opted for one of these solutions and now wishes they had tried something else? Or did you try something you knew was right and it worked?
Does anyone have a good address for a supplier of this stuff?

Thanks for your input!
 

Edwin

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I've obviously missed something here. Can you direct me to the story of how you set about building the machine, or where I can get more information?
 

kross

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Gerard Scanlan said:
Here is a link to a very helpful website if you are considering building one of these machines.
http://www.rockslide.org/drum%20sander.html

hi gerard! - is that how you made your drum sander? i'm about to embark on my own, in the not-too-distant future, & would love to hear of your experiences - tips/pitfalls etc

cheers
chris
 

Lowlife

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Looks easy enough, I've always wanted a drum sander but can't afford one, I could build one of these though! It would be nice to add a power feed, wonder what would be the best way to do that?
 

DaveyP

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I've always wanted a drum sander but can't afford one,
+1 on that..

Even the second hand ones fetch way to much..lol

As I don't intend sanding planks I'm thinking that instead of a power feed, a power hold it back may be required :?
maybe I should consider a home brew version of the 'sand flee' drum sander



http://www.rjrstudios.com/

Which is another fine example of the good gear only being available in the colonies (still to expensive though)
 

Gerard Scanlan

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I used solid oak for the frame and not walnut and maple as the instructions suggested. I didn't want to use softwood as I was concerned that the hinges would tear out. I bought a 1100 watt induction motor secound hand but stupidly I bought the cushion bearings and pulleys new. I wish I had gone to look for them in a scrap yard. The cushion bearings, bushings and pulley wheels cost more than the rest together. I have not used laminate for the bed of the sander (I would have done if I could have found it cheap) I instead got a sheet of steel from a scrap merchant where I bought all the bolts I needed too. Got an emergency stop button off some ebay shop for a fiver.
Now I am trying to decide whether or not to used velcro for attaching the sand paper or some kind of mechanical fixing system.
The trickest part is the raising mechanism and that is not really that complicated.
I will post some pictures when it is up and running.

It has taken me a couple hours every week or so over 4 months to get to this point so it is not a never ending project. I would say that it can't really be heavy enough. An 1100 watt motor is a real beast of a thing but I am told you need a powerful motor because of the large surface area that is gripping the wood. But the motor does give the machine a slight shudder when it kicks into action and when it breaks after disengaging. I imagine if you were a model maker you could build a machine half the scale of this one and employ a lighter weight motor. In fact I may do just that one day too.
 
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