Block plane setting

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Hullo all
Having dropped my old Stanley 220 plane on the concrete floor, one which I bought about 1961or possibly earlier, I am replacing it as it is well and truly broken. I have done a few repairs on it over the years. Sad but it has been good to me over the years. Don't know what it cost, but a 41/2 smoother at the time was either 42/- or 56/-. about £2.20p or £2.67p. so it owes me little. I never thought about it and set the blade all those years ago at the ground angle .......about 21? deg.

Question is should I be setting a secondary bevel. It has always worked for me but applications do dictate and vary. Your advice would be most welcome.

M in spring like Edinburgh.
 

baldkev

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Now your asking!

On the one hand, a secondary bevel makes touching up the edge quicker, but on the other, it increases the blades cutting angle. Some will argue that the lower the bevel the better, whilst others prefer a steeper angle. Steeper is better for highly figured timber, whilst i believe low angle is better for end grain.

Personally I do have a secondary. I use my block plane regularly, but hardly ever use any other hand planes. Im a site carpenter though, not a joiner / furniture maker.
 

Orraloon

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If that angle has worked for you all those years keep doing it as long as It is getting the job done. I do use a secondary bevel as I freehand hone on an oilstone. Dont even know what the angle is but a degree or two more than the 25* primary. There is such a wide range of views on sharpening you could go broke and insane if you tried to follow all of them.
Regards
John
 

DBC

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If that angle has worked for you all those years keep doing it as long as It is getting the job done. I do use a secondary bevel as I freehand hone on an oilstone. Dont even know what the angle is but a degree or two more than the 25* primary. There is such a wide range of views on sharpening you could go broke and insane if you tried to follow all of them.
Regards
John
I do exactly this. I use mine most days. Probably take the blade out most days to put on the stone to touch it up. Sorry to hear you dropped yours. I dropped mine on a concrete floor once but managed to stick my boot out in time to cushion the fall. I was lucky.
 

Jacob

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Mines a 220 and very much used. I always just do it the trad way; "fine" grade oilstone, freehand a quick hone at 30º but dipping a touch to give a slightly rounded bevel. All it ever needs - very quick, a little and often. No primary/secondary bevels involved.
 

thetyreman

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secondary bevels are optional, I don't like them at all, much prefer a single bevel that's sharpened freehand, mainly because of the time it saves, same as jacob.
 

Limey Lurker

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I repaired my friend's 220 by bronze-welding it. I "Veed" the edges of the break, clamped it to a steel plate, warmed it thoroughly, and applied the bronze using acetylene/oxygen through a number 2 nozzle. There was a some filing to the bronze to be done after, but, 19 years later, he's still using the plane.
 
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Hi everyone.
Well, I got the answers I nearly expected so excellent. Baldkev ... If I'm tired I can have a small bevel on it. Orraloon (Scottish connection ?) I have stuck to the provided angle. I have an old mucker up in Alice Springs. See him occasionally. DBC ...did exactly the same ...several times. Yes Jacob I may do the same. Remember you Gothic window erection on legs from years ago. Same for you Tyreman. Limey Lurker I have a brazed bullnose which I picked up for £3 at an antique sale. I think I was the nearest to antiques! Well there you all. I got my replacement yesterday and it looks OK. Put an edge on it and it will be fine. The varnish was almost as hard as the steel. and levelling the sole will take ages . Half and hour plus and more later. I bought the original to do fore-edges for chipboard, blockboard, laminboard. Best wishes.
M
 

Orraloon

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Hi everyone.
Well, I got the answers I nearly expected so excellent. Baldkev ... If I'm tired I can have a small bevel on it. Orraloon (Scottish connection ?) I have stuck to the provided angle. I have an old mucker up in Alice Springs. See him occasionally. DBC ...did exactly the same ...several times. Yes Jacob I may do the same. Remember you Gothic window erection on legs from years ago. Same for you Tyreman. Limey Lurker I have a brazed bullnose which I picked up for £3 at an antique sale. I think I was the nearest to antiques! Well there you all. I got my replacement yesterday and it looks OK. Put an edge on it and it will be fine. The varnish was almost as hard as the steel. and levelling the sole will take ages . Half and hour plus and more later. I bought the original to do fore-edges for chipboard, blockboard, laminboard. Best wishes.
M
Yes from Aberdeenshire but been here in the colonies since 1982
 
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To my family I used to be just a loon, then an orra loon, then just a tink, and finally an orra tink. Not political correct now but it referred to peoples work and life. Was never rude when I was young. I can recall knowing tinks who stayed in their 'tent' when staying by the shore in the summer. All a long time ago.
 
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