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Best Table Saw i have ever had!

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Louie10

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I have had a few table saws over the years, I began with the DeWalt 746 cast iron hybrid table saw, a great saw but possibly just a tiny bit under powered, them I moved to a beautiful old Startrite Tilt Arbor from a famous Dublin coach builders workshop, again a little under powered. The SIP 10inch cast iron saw represented my 3rd table saw, a very well priced saw that turned out to be reliable but suffered with a poor fence, so this takes me to my current table saw, in terms of price it has been a jump of faith but a decision that I have come to feel very good about.
The big Laguna Fusion 3 is in every way a bench mark machine, its powerful 3hp induction motor makes short work of even the very hardest of Oak, its large cast iron table and finely ground wings offer ample support, the clever zero clearance plate locks very snuggly into the table. The quick release lever that allows for fast adjustment of the riving knive is a well thought out design features.
The fence which glides extremely smoothly over it's long rails and locks down rock solidly, the steel used in the manufacturing of the saws main cabinet is machined out of very heavy gauge steel, it would be hard to point out a negative as there really isn't any, I guess if I did wish to offer something towards the designers drawings that would be the possibility of soft start but that's really it!
I had shopped around for a long time, reading many reviews but in the end the Laguna caught my eye and imagination!
If you are looking for a table saw that is solid, well and heavily made, powerful to cut very hard woods, a fence that's spot on perfect and glides effortlessly and let's not forget a stunningly beautiful saw, then stop and take a long look at this black magic box, it's a very clever machine.
 

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Cabinetman

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Thanks Louie it’s always good to find a satisfied customer to be able to recommend something worth having for the rest of us on here. What size blade does it have by the way? About the only thing I can see to comment on is I would like a foot operated mushroom stop switch but I’m sure I could live without that. Ian
 

Louie10

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Thanks Louie it’s always good to find a satisfied customer to be able to recommend something worth having for the rest of us on here. What size blade does it have by the way? About the only thing I can see to comment on is I would like a foot operated mushroom stop switch but I’m sure I could live without that. Ian
Hi Ian thankyou for your kind words, 10inch is the saw blade, I use a pro cut freud blade, good clean cuts, yes that's a great comment suggestion in relation to the mushroom stop switch. The control switch is in a position that can be awkward at times to reach when cutting. Stay safe pal.regards Louie
 

TominDales

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The big Laguna Fusion 3 is in every way a bench mark machine, its powerful 3hp induction motor makes short work of even the very hardest of Oak, its large cast iron table and finely ground wings offer ample support, the clever zero clearance plate locks very snuggly into the table. The quick release lever that allows for fast adjustment of the riving knive is a well thought out design features.
Do you use it for cross cutting and if so how do you do it. My first and only TS is a cheap 10'' Einhiel that I got from the local timber merchants when I decided a bit spur of the moment that I should stop doing everything by hand as age was catching up with me. It was only £100 but I've probably spend 50+ hours making a proper fence and squaring up the table with old aluminium extrusion and a home made slider. and then re-worked all the dust extraction. Its pretty actuate but is underpowered and the noise is a horrible scream. Not sure I have the space for a big cast ion machine, but tempted.
 

LJM

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Do you use it for cross cutting and if so how do you do it. My first and only TS is a cheap 10'' Einhiel that I got from the local timber merchants when I decided a bit spur of the moment that I should stop doing everything by hand as age was catching up with me. It was only £100 but I've probably spend 50+ hours making a proper fence and squaring up the table with old aluminium extrusion and a home made slider. and then re-worked all the dust extraction. Its pretty actuate but is underpowered and the noise is a horrible scream. Not sure I have the space for a big cast ion machine, but tempted.
there are regularly posts by people who believe that they don’t have space for an old cast iron machine. Often those same post go on to outline a plan for a contractor saw, on a stand; I’m often confused as to how such things take up less space that a proper machine.
Others, as you’ve described, often report many hours fettling a new, low end or contractor machine, having said they don’t want to spend hours fettling a second hand one.

My Startrite is less than 750mm square. If I needed to, Icould drop the blade when the machine was not in use, and use it as an extra work surface, perhaps protected with a thin sheet of something.

So with a very few exceptions, I can see little reason not to go for a floor standing machine.

if you’re not making money fromthe machine, or are simply cash poor and time rich, or on environmental grounds, an old machine makes a lot of sense; worst case you buy one with no fences, a motor that needs to be swapped out; the process of getting to work is really very little different to assembling a machine from Axminster (though a lot more satisfying), and you get to spec the aftermarket fence that you prefer, power supply to suit your situation and needs and so one.

Once complete (I’m away from home at the moment), mine will have cost £700 for a 12” machine with sliding carriage, fancy mitre gauge, fancy rip fence with add on hold down things. The sliding carriage folds down, so I’ve still got a footprint of less than 900x900.
 
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DBT85

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To be fair, the thread on here at the moment about fixing up an AGS is exactly why some people don't want to get an old machine. It's one thing fettling any new machine to get it set up, it's quite another trying to determine what type of thread is required for an old part that there is little information on in order to just get the machine working. Sometimes you just don't want it to be a month or mroe between getting the tool and being able to use the tool.

I absolutely agree on the footprint part though, unless the desire is to pack it away when not in use.
 

LJM

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To be fair, the thread on here at the moment about fixing up an AGS is exactly why some people don't want to get an old machine. It's one thing fettling any new machine to get it set up, it's quite another trying to determine what type of thread is required for an old part that there is little information on in order to just get the machine working. Sometimes you just don't want it to be a month or mroe between getting the tool and being able to use the tool.

I absolutely agree on the footprint part though, unless the desire is to pack it away when not in use.
this may be true of Wadkins and others, but in some cases, such as Startrite, parts are still available.
 

Louie10

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Do you use it for cross cutting and if so how do you do it. My first and only TS is a cheap 10'' Einhiel that I got from the local timber merchants when I decided a bit spur of the moment that I should stop doing everything by hand as age was catching up with me. It was only £100 but I've probably spend 50+ hours making a proper fence and squaring up the table with old aluminium extrusion and a home made slider. and then re-worked all the dust extraction. Its pretty actuate but is underpowered and the noise is a horrible scream. Not sure I have the space for a big cast ion machine, but tempted.
Hi there, I don't use a sled but you certaintly could as there is two mitre slots. I will get around to making a sled at some stage, your saw arrangement meats your need but the sound from brushed motors is dreadful as you said, if you have the space my suggestion is go for a good table saw, with an induction motor, if not the big Laguna there is good charmwood saws, smaller and with quiet induction. Regards Louie
 

TominDales

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there are regularly posts by people who believe that they don’t have space for an old cast iron machine. Often those same post go on to outline a plan for a contractor saw, on a stand; I’m often confused as to how such things take up less space that a proper machine.
Others, as you’ve described, often report many hours fettling a new, low end or contractor machine, having said they don’t want to spend hours fettling a second hand one.

My Startrite is less than 750mm square. If I needed to, Icould drop the blade when the machine was not in use, and use it as an extra work surface, perhaps protected with a thin sheet of something.

So with a very few exceptions, I can see little reason not to go for a floor standing machine.

if you’re not making money fromthe machine, or are simply cash poor and time rich, or on environmental grounds, an old machine makes a lot of sense; worst case you buy one with no fences, a motor that needs to be swapped out; the process of getting to work is really very little different to assembling a machine from Axminster (though a lot more satisfying), and you get to spec the aftermarket fence that you prefer, power supply to suit your situation and needs and so one.

Once complete (I’m away from home at the moment), mine will have cost £700 for a 12” machine with sliding carriage, fancy mitre gauge, fancy rip fence with add on hold down things. The sliding carriage folds down, so I’ve still got a footprint of less than 900x900.
Hi I did look for a Startrite on ebey with a sliding table sometime before covid stopped everything I seem to remember the one I liked had a slider and a fold out bed. Since then I bought a small lathe so have less room than before.
I'll get some photos of my set up and write down what I think my needs are. Take the point about not wanting something old that needs fixing. But one that is still services would probably do. The two issues are for a part timer with family and work, how much money should I really spend on my hobby and how much space. From a space perspective, maybe if it fits the current footprint I'd be ok. At present I have a home made slider, but for really accurate cross-cut I have to use a sled with an overhead guard.
 

LJM

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Don’t fancy my chances down a step onto a gravel path with a Laguna even if it is on castors 🤣
Well then you may be describing one of the possible exceptional circumstances. However, in such a situation, I’d be considering other options such as trestles and a track saw
 
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