Best exterior caulking material for wood sash windows/sills on unlisted 1800's sandstone property?

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Adam W.

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It is rather! I've met a few who have been sensible enough to take good advice but some not - their training is much too broad for many purposes and until they have specialised for enough years in one area they may not know their Rrs from their elbows.
And there's me considering an MA in architecture at Aarhus University.
 

C64

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Oakum, lime mortar and burnt sand mastic. It’s more labour and time but is appropriate for traditional windows and buildings. Arguing something else is better based on time alone isn’t really an argument in my book unless you want to tart up the place before selling it pronto.
 

johnnyb

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he's filling replacement timber windows. maybe use the traditional stuff around the edges and on the masonry. I only recommended repaircare to fill the timber.
 

C64

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Fair enough. I go for linseed putty as filler myself but that’s cos it works best with linseed oil paint.
 

johnnyb

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I'm a fan of traditional materials tbh. I've always used and liked linseed putty on single glazing. I also like whiting to clean the oil off and adjust consistency.
but repaircare works really well as a bulk filler and splicing glue and fits into (3)sensible time scales. polyester filler( car body stuff) is not flexible enough to repair exterior stuff IMHO.
my paint choice is durable and gives a traditional gloss and goes over old oil based fine. linseed paint seems like a great choice but how does it cope over old gloss?
 

Wrongfoot

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Thanks all, with the property being sandstone I can expect some humidity changes in the stone and also the timber sills and trim. There'll always be some movement and I need to account for that. I think the original paint was a modern acrylic plasticky type so I'll have to make sure there's a key and the new paint is suitable. Test pots probably.

I'm not sure I would have chosen to buy an expensive set of timber sashes made up with a plastic paint but you inherit other's decisions when you buy any property.

I'm really pleased with the responses as people aren't just suggesting a paint or filler they're giving a context of how they use stuff and why. This a great place for advice.
 
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wobblycogs

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I've just started using Timbabuild (as recommended previously) and I think it's great. It's fast to apply and ready to continue the job after a decent tea break. It sands well and it's as flexible as the wood (maybe more so). RepairCare seems to be exactly the same stuff but it was somewhat more expensive when I priced it up. The only rule is apply it as per the instructions, there are videos online for both systems. It's not cheap but it takes the w out of work.
 

johnnyb

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I'll try timbabuild ive always used repaircare but cheapers better. repaircare also do a compatible fine surface filler that would fit in really well for that "last skim"
 

C64

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I use Timbabuild when splicing in new wood to eg rotted sill section of windows and it does work well. I try to keep it to a minimum on the surface as I personally found the softer woods like pine would sand away faster than Timbabuild. It does scrape away very nicely with a sharpened card scraper. One thing you might want to check is whether the repaircare gun will fit the Timbabuild cartridge - looks like it should otherwise it’s another £30-odd out of the pocket.
 

pgrbff

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I haven't read every post but I have always used burnt sand mastic. A mixture of burnt sand, I'm not sure why it is burn't, and boiled linseed oil which I mix and apply with plasterers fine tools and/or marhalltown 'tuck pointers'. This works well, is traditional and is easy to remove or repair, unlike modern mastics. I get mine in Edinburgh.
Of course this is intended to seal the gap btween timber and stone, not as a filler.
 
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johnny

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Oh God!..........Architects.

It's got to be the most overrated profession ever.

is this a personal dig aimed at me Adam ?
Its so easy for unqualified armchair jockeys to take a pop at professional people who have undertaken a 7 year University course and a 50+ year work experience in the Construction industry . 😁 most folk cannot afford to employ us so they employ cowboy builders and then complain when their job goes titsup
 

tinfoil

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'It's a big 'ole that putty can't fill' - the favourite saying of an old painter/decorator I used to know. He'd insert it as often as possible into building site conversations and not always in relation to decorating...........
 

Adam W.

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is this a personal dig aimed at me Adam ?
Its so easy for unqualified armchair jockeys to take a pop at professional people who have undertaken a 7 year University course and a 50+ year work experience in the Construction industry . 😁 most folk cannot afford to employ us so they employ cowboy builders and then complain when their job goes titsup
No, don't take it personally.

I'm just a having laugh at an overrated profession full of people with inflated egos who are good at bluffing. I qualified as an architectural technician in the 80's plus I hold various other university qualifications in construction. I've also dealt with them during my 10 years as an architectural photographer on some of Europes largest construction sites, so I'm qualified enough to have an opinion.

Actually, thinking about it, it was 16 years. Time flies when you're having fun !
 

pgrbff

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Epoxy Resin is the go-to wood repair for Architects working on timber conservation projects . Basically its a posh version of car body filla .
I have used Epoxy Resin filler on external wood renovation for over 30 years its a superb solution. You can drill file sand paint repairs and it has a super-fine composition to fill the tiniest of scratches and surface imperfections. How & When To Use An Epoxy Wood Filler - Old House Journal Magazine
I thought conservation needed to be reversible? Epoxy is anything but reversible.
 

johnny

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I thought conservation needed to be reversible? Epoxy is anything but reversible.
No ...timber conservation is not designed to be 'reversible' why on earth would anyone want to 'reverse' a conservation repair ?
what gave you that idea ?
 
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johnny

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No, don't take it personally.

I'm just a having laugh at an overrated profession full of people with inflated egos who are good at bluffing. I qualified as an architectural technician in the 80's plus I hold various other university qualifications in construction. I've also dealt with them during my 10 years as an architectural photographer on some of Europes largest construction sites, so I'm qualified enough to have an opinion.

Actually, thinking about it, it was 16 years. Time flies when you're having fun !
well I guess we all meet people with inflated egos in every walk of life ...just look at the Medical profession for example. Some of them I've found to be arrogant condescending and dismissive but we can't tar a whole profession with the same brush because of a small minority that we have the misfortune to have to deal with can we;):).
 

Jacob

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No ...timber conservation is not designed to be 'reversible' why on earth would anyone want to 'reverse' a conservation repair ?
what gave you that idea ?
It applies to musical instruments or other high value items which may need subsequent repairs in the ordinary way of maintenance.
 

pgrbff

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No ...timber conservation is not designed to be 'reversible' why on earth would anyone want to 'reverse' a conservation repair ?
what gave you that idea ?
Stone, plaster, brickwork conservation is all reversible, ie lime rather than cement. I agree with Jacob.
 

woodieallen

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Linseed oil paint is the spawn of Satan. Despite putting it on very, very thinly it still takes forever to dry. And if you're not careful with the final brush strokes then you get little bits of wet linseed oil underneath a thin skin that will scrape off very easily, exposing the wet linseed oil paint that then transfers to your hands and thence to everything else.

And never get it accidentally onto a metal surface as it just sits there..wet..just waiting for you to pick that screwdriver up by the linseed oiled handle thence to the door knob to your workshop thence to lots of other unexpected places.

But it saves the real best bit until last or about six months later when you discover that mould and mildew love linseed oil paint as a feeding station and your lovely paint job has gone black. DAMHIKT. I discovered that the fix (but too late) is to chuck out of the window all the eco-rubbish that linseed oil paint manufactures hype and add a serious amount of zinc oxide.

Or better still, don't use it in the first place. Ghastly stuff.
 

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