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anyone had success with homeade bandsaw tyres?

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Hornbeam

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We used it in work to make gaskets for access doors/hatches into very large oil/water emulsion tank. It is a fibre reinforced rubber. I cannot remember what adhesive I used other than it was a contact type
See link to an e bay add. No idea of that particular product quality but just an example
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/SOLID-PLY-REI ... QA__JbPwtg
 

woodpig

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Hornbeam":29ajckbs said:
We used it in work to make gaskets for access doors/hatches into very large oil/water emulsion tank. It is a fibre reinforced rubber. I cannot remember what adhesive I used other than it was a contact type
See link to an e bay add. No idea of that particular product quality but just an example
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/SOLID-PLY-REI ... QA__JbPwtg
Good tip, thanks for that.
 

JamieNE

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Can anyone tell me which Vax belts were used here please?
I’ve had a look online but there are so many types.

Thanks in advance,
Jamie
 

Keith 66

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I replaced the tyres on an ancient 30" Wadkin some years back. optione were rubber, rubber cork compound and Polyurethane, I went with the latter. It was bonded on with epoxy & a scarf joint. Crowning them was fun, Bottom wheel we ran the motor with the blade off & a jig to hold a sanding block . Top wheel we drove the wheel with a sanding drum on an electric drill while a second person held the sanding block to crown it.
Worked really well!
 

Ttrees

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Wow I wished I knew such a material existed!
Great to know it's good for gluing too!
Crowning or dressing flat is easy if you use the side of a plane iron.
Using a large f clamp to hold an offcut from a door stile, lightly clamped on end at the 7 o clock position on the upper wheel cabinet.
Using another small g clamp and a strip to hold the plane iron lenghtways , so it's a 90 degree cutting edge which is great for rubber.
Gradually increase the block with clamped iron to make contact with the tire, the cutting angle is much like a regular scraper, leaning away from the work, the only difference is it you present the block too upright it will dig into the rubber and make a very deep cut, so it needs to be leaning away
from the cut and that means you need a good f clamp for smooth cutter advancement.
The same block can be used at the 11 o'clock position on the lower wheel.
A sheet of ply to stop something dropping and chipping the paint on the base is a good idea.
If you don't have soft grips on the f clamp it might badly stuff the back of the machine.
If you can it's easier to check with the wheel slid out from the cabinet.
I found it was very hard checked with a spirit level type straight edge and nice square for the job.
Maybe that was just my eyes but keep that in mind.
If you're going for a flat tire setup, I have much better luck using axminster bandsaw blades.
I had some serious damage to the tires and have rigged the crowning jig up a few times, so it's handy to do.
That door stile might give better results if not quite square, my piece was square and needed persuasion to counter the force from being clamped on end.
You can relieve a bit of the block to get the plane iron closer.
Nice and tidy job to do making rubber shavings but your fingers do take a blisterin! :)
A blue biro can be used if wanting to know exactly where you're taking material off, as its difficult to see it in the cut as the shavings obscure the view.
Truing bandsaw tires.jpg

Checking for uniform tire height.JPG
SAM_2863.JPG
 

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