Aged brass round head screws?

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Doug71

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I'm looking for some old looking slotted round head brass screws, 1 1/2" x #8 (40mm x 4mm in new money), need about 150 of them.

I can find normal brass but not aged brass (or bronze would probably do), well I can but at silly prices in packs of 10.

Anyone know where I can get some at a sensible price? If it comes to it does the ageing brass with vinegar and salt thing that I have read about work?

Not sure how long it takes for unlacquered brass to tarnish naturally indoors?
 
I've used a liquid product in the past to age brass hinges, it was called Tourmaline, dropped them a dish, needed to watch over them as they can go black if left too long.
 
I've used a liquid product in the past to age brass hinges, it was called Tourmaline, dropped them a dish, needed to watch over them as they can go black if left too long.
I'd 2nd using Tourmaline to age brass - I think it actually contains a dilute acid , likely Nitric but it works pretty quickly like in 5 mins you'll see a colour change.
The trick is to lock that change in and make it more durable - so once you've got the effect you want, rinse in water and dry carefully and then lightly brush on Jade oil - this like Tung oil dries by oxidation and when dry will provide a durable protection for your patinated surface.
I've used this on brass door handle sets and it takes the nasty (and cheap looking) finish off and tones them down aesthetically
 
Thanks everyone

I have ordered some brass screws from Screwline and some Tourmaline from an online supplier 👍

Thinking about it a few years ago I had some galvanised metal finials made for my house roof, the chap who made them decanted some blue liquid into an empty Lucozade bottle for me to age them with. I remember the bottle sat on the shelf in my old workshop but can't remember what happened to it when I moved workshops, was probably the same stuff 🤔
 
I think you have to age it with tourmaline then seal it with jade oil? Any I think I got the jade oil at a car boot for a song.....never did find the tourmaline! I think ammonia works as well(8080 the nasty stuff)
 
I had some galvanised metal finials made
Another trick with ageing galv fittings is to paint/wash them with diluted brick acid, I do it on T hinges for instance to make them look a bit more in keeping, with a weathered look.
 
One thing to be aware of but maybe not applicable to screw heads is the fact that most brass -and certainly door furniture are usually varnished, and that this can be quite difficult to remove with the current dumbed-down Nitromors type products. I di=ont know if the manufacturers bake it on but it's very tough to remove and obviously if you miss a bit it shows up like a sore thumb if you then patinate it with Tourmaline...
 
Shame about the size. I've just had a look at the screw "collection" I inherited when my father passed away over 30 years ago. Amongst them I have a tin full of what looks like 1" x 10's. I think a few of them are used.

Colin
 

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Thanks everyone

I have ordered some brass screws from Screwline and some Tourmaline from an online supplier 👍

Thinking about it a few years ago I had some galvanised metal finials made for my house roof, the chap who made them decanted some blue liquid into an empty Lucozade bottle for me to age them with. I remember the bottle sat on the shelf in my old workshop but can't remember what happened to it when I moved workshops, was probably the same stuff 🤔

I made some cupric nitrate solution (which is bright blue) a long time ago for ageing copper and brass by dissolving copper wire in nitric acid.

You need to do it outside as it gives off a nasty brown gas (nitrogen dioxide) while reacting.

I just kept feeding it copper wire till the reaction stopped to ensure all the nitric acid was consumed.

BTW if you ever want to etch steel (even stainless), ferric chloride is the biz.

Its sold as etchant for making circuit boards but it'll happily eat steal as fast as copper.

I bought chromate etchant to etch stainless and the chromate wouldn't look at it.

I left a bit in ferric chloride as a test for 20 mins and it had gouged 2mm deep holes in 316L.
 
I'm looking for some old looking slotted round head brass screws, 1 1/2" x #8 (40mm x 4mm in new money), need about 150 of them.

I can find normal brass but not aged brass (or bronze would probably do), well I can but at silly prices in packs of 10.

Anyone know where I can get some at a sensible price? If it comes to it does the ageing brass with vinegar and salt thing that I have read about work?

Not sure how long it takes for unlacquered brass to tarnish naturally indoors?
Large Tupperware type ( shows how old I am) lidded sealed plastic box, a rannikin open topped container glass/clay glazed around 55 to 60mm wide 25 to 30mm deep filled with PVA adhesive. place this in the center of the Box, screws loosely spread in the bottom of the box, not in contact with the adhesive, keep the box level, clip the lid on the reaction normally takes around a week, aged brass (I hope )
 
In antique furniture restoration, I have always used Mahogany sawdust with Ammonia 0.88 in a sealed poly box (Tupperware?). Put the items into the box give it a bit of a shake. Check frequently (outside and don't inhale) rinse off with water. Gives a much nicer colour than Tourmaline.
 
Salt dissolved in vinegar will age brass screws and wont cost the earth like some 'proprietary' brands
Paint it on and away you go.

Any left over can go on your chips.
 
Salt dissolved in vinegar will age brass screws and wont cost the earth like some 'proprietary' brands
Paint it on and away you go.

Any left over can go on your chips.
On any brass components of music instruments, we suspended any replacement parts over dishes of human urine; very easily obtainable in any workshop environment ... Best not to put the leftovers on your chips, though!
 

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