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3 little luthiers planes. I think.

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Bm101

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I bought these a good while back. Unnecessary purchase but not expensive. Quite possibly influenced by a nice drop of red. :oops:
Anyone have any idea on origin or maker? I suspect that are 'homemade' or finished from bought castings. Be interested if anyone /luthiers had any insights to the contrary. Don't suppose for a minute they are anything special or worth much but always interested to learn anything new.







Cheers as always
Chris
(Not a tool collector! Honest! )
 

TFrench

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Very pretty!

No shame in being a tool collector - if an object is beautiful and brings you joy in owning it, and it's functional as well - isn't that better than an expensive painting on your wall? It is to me, anyway.
 

AndyT

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I can understand why you wanted them!

I don't know much about these but they must have belonged to someone who had the skills to make them, so could easily be user made.

I discussed some similar brass planes with Richard Arnold once. He'd made them by squeezing some offcuts of tube in a vice then silver soldering a base on. He said they weren't hard to make and to be fair it's the sort of project which used to get made in school metalwork. Don't get me wrong, they're lovely, I'm just thinking about what's most likely.

The wooden one looks good too!
 

rxh

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Yes, user made violin planes, nicely done.
 

D_W

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AndyT":w1opgr38 said:
I can understand why you wanted them!

I don't know much about these but they must have belonged to someone who had the skills to make them, so could easily be user made.

I discussed some similar brass planes with Richard Arnold once. He'd made them by squeezing some offcuts of tube in a vice then silver soldering a base on. He said they weren't hard to make and to be fair it's the sort of project which used to get made in school metalwork. Don't get me wrong, they're lovely, I'm just thinking about what's most likely.

The wooden one looks good too!

George wilson once said the same thing to me about a really nifty guitar top scraper plane that he'd made. I asked where it went, he said he left it at Williamsburg or with another craftsman there and never bothered to get it back, even though it wasn't their property. I thought that was unusual for an infill (his was infilled) and he remarked that he'd just smashed tube into an oval and sweated a sole onto it and made an infill. The whole scraper plane took about an hour, he said, including infill.

https://youtu.be/EKfBmcGmRfk?t=613

it can be seen in that video, scraping a harpsichord sound board.

The finger planes like shown above are all over the place in the violin making (and subsequently archtop making) world. I'd bet there were dozens of makers of them at one point until carving machines were common, and ibex brand still makes brass or bronze versions of them very reasonably as violin making and archtop making is still mostly professional makers and not violin lawyers. Those guys make electric guitars. (a joke in the guitar world is that the highest priced guitars end up in the hands of blues lawyers. They're not good at guitar, but they can afford the guitars. "who can afford a $7000 les paul replica?" ..."blues lawyers").

The chinese make infill versions of them, too - also too cheap to make it worth making your own, but they aren't necessarily that well made.
 
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