Sous Vide Recipes. What are your best/favourite/proven uses? All suggestions welcome.

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D_W

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U.K. Workshop? I am at a loss to understand the connection!

Perhaps you didn't notice the "off topic, general chat" heading at the top of this?. I'm sure you didn't, but meat and bread are kind of popular on US forums, too - both are kind of in line with making things (pizza from scratch, too, as well as growing gardens).

I'd imagine that if you quizzed a country club group who golfs three times a week, you might not find much excitement for cooking/making/bread/pizza, but on a knife or woodworking or metalworking forum, I'd imagine the turnout is pretty strong.
 

D_W

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Of course, I started this thread turned off by the sort of foreign language branding of the process, but I'm sold in the idea as I already live in the world of less cooked meats.

I think we'll use the term "with vacuum" here. My mrs is a recipe cooker and not particularly good at judgement in pan to oven and back cooking (she will cook pretty much everything until it's the same color and then a beyond that a little for fear of getting sick), but she may be willing to do this since it takes care of the temperature part of the process.
 

Phil Pascoe

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Ah, back to bread. I've found the best white bread flour yet (by a mile), and I've tried probably ten or twelve -
 

sometimewoodworker

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I think we'll use the term "with vacuum" here.
That is rather restrictive and confusing to say the least.
certainly sous vide has that literal meaning, but the cooking term sous vide definitely isn’t restricted to vacuum sealed cooking, so trying to use the term “with vacuum", an unknown & incorrect phrase to replace the well known, maybe not to you, Sous Vide cooking term is a poor idea.

You of course are welcome to use whatever term you like, but as with food and degrees of cooking, others may well like & use something different.

I do have a couple of vacuum sealing machines but only use them for some of my Sous Vide cooking, the rest is for freezer use.

The original Sous Vide used professional, very very expensive, machines for both cooking and packing food for cooking. The original packaging machines were chamber machines that cost upwards of £700. Since you can now get completely different principle machines for less than 10% of that and can use a simple reusable bag costing under 1% of that, the packaging is cheap.
Going on to the heating machines they are now similarly lower in price for non professional machines so almost anyone can use a process that was only usable in professional kitchens.
 

Rorschach

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I might have mentioned it here before but if you have a vacuum sealer they are useful without having the immersion circulator to do sous vide cooking.

I use my vacuum sealer in combination with my slow cooker to confit duck legs. Rather than immersing them in a big pan of fat which is costly and messy I seal them in a bag along with a couple of spoonfuls of duck fat and then cook in the slow cooker until I see the meat pulling away from the bone. The slow cooker maintains a cooking temp of around 90C on low which is perfect for gently cooking the duck legs without drying them out and I find it easier and more cost effective than the immersion circulator in this case.

Once cooked I put the bags straight into a big bowl of cold water, you could add ice if you wish, to cool them as quickly as possible and then freeze them. They will keep in the freezer very well like this as they are theoretically sterile inside. When you want to serve you just need to defrost and brown them in a frying pan until crispy. They won't be encased in a deep layer of fat so much easier to get out and reheat with less mess again than the standard method and you may even be able to separate the fat and juices to roast potatoes and make gravy if you wish.
 

D_W

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That is rather restrictive and confusing to say the least.
certainly sous vide has that literal meaning, but the cooking term sous vide definitely isn’t restricted to vacuum sealed cooking, so trying to use the term “with vacuum", an unknown & incorrect phrase to replace the well known, maybe not to you, Sous Vide cooking term is a poor idea.

You of course are welcome to use whatever term you like, but as with food and degrees of cooking, others may well like & use something different.

I do have a couple of vacuum sealing machines but only use them for some of my Sous Vide cooking, the rest is for freezer use.

The original Sous Vide used professional, very very expensive, machines for both cooking and packing food for cooking. The original packaging machines were chamber machines that cost upwards of £700. Since you can now get completely different principle machines for less than 10% of that and can use a simple reusable bag costing under 1% of that, the packaging is cheap.
Going on to the heating machines they are now similarly lower in price for non professional machines so almost anyone can use a process that was only usable in professional kitchens.

I believe that's the literal translation, isn't it? Names often start as something narrow and don't expand as the definition of something gets more broad.
 

Droogs

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There is of course another great use for this kit and that is to use the bags and sealer as a small scall vacuum veneer press.
 

Bm101

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Probably not one for Stuart Paul ( :) ).
I did the gammon yesterday, brown sugar melted down with balsamic vinegar glaze. Very nice. Awesome tbf.
Today I did that Lidl aged beef joint. I was going to try Droog's tea suggestion. Sorry Droogs. Port. And. Garlic.
Then I saw this port and garlic idea.
3 hours at 56.
Holy Sh*t.
It came out rare with a R.
Would the kids eat it?
The Mrs?

20201108_175026.jpg


Made the cooking juices into gravy and the kids ate that too. Fu*kin' Marvellous.
No one ate the vegetables LMAO!
I'm really excited about cooking again. Amazeballs.
Happy days.
£8 joint of meat works out cheaper tham Mcdonalds burgers. That's perspective on it.
 

Droogs

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The use of tea is from a Mrs Beaton recipe, the tannin in the tea slowly tenderizes the meat. I also go over the joint with the carving fork and get rid of any frustration to give the tea an easy route in (before cooking). The juices then used to make the gravy. Just awesome
 

Phil Pascoe

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I bought the Sous Vide Cookbook (Rachel Collins) which looks to be a decent recipe book. One of the first things I read is to try using asafoetida instead of garlic as garlic in a sous vide tends to make things bitter. I tried my new Aldi sous vide yesterday with two chicken breasts. Fine, but I find the thing difficult to programme atm - it just doesn't like my touch. My wife programmed it effortlessly.
 

Garno

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Probably not one for Stuart Paul ( :) ).
I did the gammon yesterday, brown sugar melted down with balsamic vinegar glaze. Very nice. Awesome tbf.
Today I did that Lidl aged beef joint. I was going to try Droog's tea suggestion. Sorry Droogs. Port. And. Garlic.
Then I saw this port and garlic idea.
3 hours at 56.
Holy Sh*t.
It came out rare with a R.
Would the kids eat it?
The Mrs?

View attachment 96088

Made the cooking juices into gravy and the kids ate that too. Fu*kin' Marvellous.
No one ate the vegetables LMAO!
I'm really excited about cooking again. Amazeballs.
Happy days.
£8 joint of meat works out cheaper tham Mcdonalds burgers. That's perspective on it.

I've seen thicker pieces of paper, With all that blood it would be far too raw for my delicate palette and fat gut.
 

Phil Pascoe

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Probably not one for Stuart Paul ( :) ).
I did the gammon yesterday, brown sugar melted down with balsamic vinegar glaze. Very nice. Awesome tbf.
Today I did that Lidl aged beef joint. I was going to try Droog's tea suggestion. Sorry Droogs. Port. And. Garlic.
Then I saw this port and garlic idea.
3 hours at 56.
Holy Sh*t.
It came out rare with a R.
Would the kids eat it?
The Mrs?

View attachment 96088

Made the cooking juices into gravy and the kids ate that too. Fu*kin' Marvellous.
No one ate the vegetables LMAO!
I'm really excited about cooking again. Amazeballs.
Happy days.
£8 joint of meat works out cheaper tham Mcdonalds burgers. That's perspective on it.

How would you like your beef sir? Oh, just chop off his horns and wipe his assss.:)
 

stuartpaul

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Probably not one for Stuart Paul ( :) ).
I did the gammon yesterday, brown sugar melted down with balsamic vinegar glaze. Very nice. Awesome tbf.
Today I did that Lidl aged beef joint. I was going to try Droog's tea suggestion. Sorry Droogs. Port. And. Garlic.
Then I saw this port and garlic idea.
3 hours at 56.
Holy Sh*t.
It came out rare with a R.
Would the kids eat it?
The Mrs?

View attachment 96088

Made the cooking juices into gravy and the kids ate that too. Fu*kin' Marvellous.
No one ate the vegetables LMAO!
I'm really excited about cooking again. Amazeballs.
Happy days.
£8 joint of meat works out cheaper tham Mcdonalds burgers. That's perspective on it.
I suspect Chris that it would taste very nice, - if it was properly cooked! 🤮
 

Geoff_S

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Probably not one for Stuart Paul ( :) ).
I did the gammon yesterday, brown sugar melted down with balsamic vinegar glaze. Very nice. Awesome tbf.
Today I did that Lidl aged beef joint. I was going to try Droog's tea suggestion. Sorry Droogs. Port. And. Garlic.
Then I saw this port and garlic idea.
3 hours at 56.
Holy Sh*t.
It came out rare with a R.
Would the kids eat it?
The Mrs?

View attachment 96088

Made the cooking juices into gravy and the kids ate that too. Fu*kin' Marvellous.
No one ate the vegetables LMAO!
I'm really excited about cooking again. Amazeballs.
Happy days.
£8 joint of meat works out cheaper tham Mcdonalds burgers. That's perspective on it.

Was your slice the one on the left?
 

AJB Temple

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Ah, back to bread. I've found the best white bread flour yet (by a mile), and I've tried probably ten or twelve -
Which have you tried Phil? I am presently using Dove's Farm very strong organic white (24kg sacks) for making sourdough (I use their Rye for the ferment). I find it a bit heavy. I tried Marriages a while ago from Bakery Bits but then they were useless during lockdown and I was unable to get it.
 
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