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By ColeyS1
#1168457
So the titles a little misleading. Everything I think I'd need to try using it, amounts to £141.68
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After hearing Jacob and others sing it's praises, I have to try it. But the initial cost is eyewateringly expensive !

Is it worth it ? Does a little go a long way ?

Coley
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By ColeyS1
#1168493
Thanks guys, I thought it worth a phone call to them. Apparently the linseed oil is only to use on prepainted stuff. New wood can get painted straight on. First coat mixed with 20%zinc.
All I needed was the paint and 200ml of the zinc. £76 quid which seems much better ! Should be with me tomorrow.

Coley

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By paulrockliffe
#1168557
I primed using linseed oil, raw not boiled, heated to 70 degrees. Then a tin of paint is £30-40 for a litre, which was enough to do 4 huge planters and a bench, with some left over. I wouldn't bother with the zinc or any fancy brushes.
By Friedrich
#1168590
What is that website?
I usually don't care about where people spend their money as it's not really my business.
however you deserve to get shafted if you even consider purchasing that stuff at those prices.
Search around, you can get that stuff for 3-10x cheaper, it may not be under those fancy made up names however... Not kidding.
also 19pounds for a brush????


If you are not good with DIY Just get a small tin from Fiddes or Osmo stuff they have similar products but at more reasonable prices, already in your desired shades, good for outdoor stuff straight out of the tin and covers sooo much..
If you want zinc oxide..just buy that stuff, it costs almost nothing from ebay and mix it up yourself..

I would NOT support that business or the people who recommend such stuff at such prices..
If you have already bought, I would suggest to ask for refund/cancel order as that's straight up SCAM.
User avatar
By ColeyS1
#1168602
Friedrich wrote:What is that website?
I usually don't care about where people spend their money as it's not really my business.
however you deserve to get shafted if you even consider purchasing that stuff at those prices.
Search around, you can get that stuff for 3-10x cheaper, it may not be under those fancy made up names however... Not kidding.
also 19pounds for a brush????


If you are not good with DIY Just get a small tin from Fiddes or Osmo stuff they have similar products but at more reasonable prices, already in your desired shades, good for outdoor stuff straight out of the tin and covers sooo much..
If you want zinc oxide..just buy that stuff, it costs almost nothing from ebay and mix it up yourself..

I would NOT support that business or the people who recommend such stuff at such prices..
If you have already bought, I would suggest to ask for refund/cancel order as that's straight up SCAM.


I wasn't aware osmo sell linseed paint ? Could you provide a link please ?

As it's my first experiment with it, I thought it best to try ready made. Perhaps I'll get my lab coat and test tubes out later if it proves successful.
Thanks for caring for me X
Coley


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By ColeyS1
#1168603
paulrockliffe wrote:I primed using linseed oil, raw not boiled, heated to 70 degrees. Then a tin of paint is £30-40 for a litre, which was enough to do 4 huge planters and a bench, with some left over. I wouldn't bother with the zinc or any fancy brushes.

Isn't it the zinc additive that prevents the mildew and mould though ?- I don't like either :lol:

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By Jacob
#1168609
I've primed on new/old wood and existing paint with raw linseed oil. Seems to work very well.
Yes the stuff is pricey but it really does go a long way and lasts a long time.
The main thing is your wood won't rot - which is the biggest draw back with modern paints and costs a bomb to rectify - or needs pressure treating with preservative, which even then will still need repainting.
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By ColeyS1
#1168623
Jacob wrote:I've primed on new/old wood and existing paint with raw linseed oil. Seems to work very well.
Yes the stuff is pricey but it really does go a long way and lasts a long time.
The main thing is your wood won't rot - which is the biggest draw back with modern paints and costs a bomb to rectify - or needs pressure treating with preservative, which even then will still need repainting.

Thanks for the recommendation Jacob. The guy on the phone was super helpful. He spoke to the allback guy in person who suggested priming new wood with the oil was unecessary. I could try my samples with and without the oil/primer if you think it's worthwhile?


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By ColeyS1
#1183355
Finally got round to putting it on a window this morning. I took off the lid and thought what on earth have I took on here.
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It looked a bit like dried up old putty, smell like it aswell ! I plunged the stirring stick in expecting it to be hard work only to discover it was a thin skin and the underneath was nice and runny. I mixed in the additive with some of the paint in a small measuring cup. I took a guess that 150ml would be sufficient for the small window. In the end I had 110ml spare !
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As Jacob said, a little goes a long way !! Coverage seemed remarkably good considering I was painting sapele. I'll check every day or so to see how long it takes to dry. Leaving it 3 days between coats wouldn't be that bad. I've known farrow and ball to still be wet after 2 weeks !

Impressed so far, need a crappy softwood project to try it on.
Cheers
Coley

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By Jacob
#1183356
Traditionally you don't paint the backs of frames. Out of sight - a waste of paint.
Install first as bare wood (or primed with linseed oil - external faces only) and only then paint what you can see. This allows the wood to breathe - water may get in but can also get out seasonally.