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Trying linseed paint - £141.68 for 1 litre

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ColeyS1

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So the titles a little misleading. Everything I think I'd need to try using it, amounts to £141.68

After hearing Jacob and others sing it's praises, I have to try it. But the initial cost is eyewateringly expensive !

Is it worth it ? Does a little go a long way ?

Coley
 

OscarG

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Wonder if Jacob recommends applying it with a pushstick?




sorry!
 

profchris

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Last time I bought boiled linseed oil it was a couple of pounds for a bottle (half litre?). Do you need to pay the extra for Duchy Original organic?
 

ColeyS1

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Thanks guys, I thought it worth a phone call to them. Apparently the linseed oil is only to use on prepainted stuff. New wood can get painted straight on. First coat mixed with 20%zinc.
All I needed was the paint and 200ml of the zinc. £76 quid which seems much better ! Should be with me tomorrow.

Coley

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paulrockliffe

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I primed using linseed oil, raw not boiled, heated to 70 degrees. Then a tin of paint is £30-40 for a litre, which was enough to do 4 huge planters and a bench, with some left over. I wouldn't bother with the zinc or any fancy brushes.
 

Friedrich

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What is that website?
I usually don't care about where people spend their money as it's not really my business.
however you deserve to get shafted if you even consider purchasing that stuff at those prices.
Search around, you can get that stuff for 3-10x cheaper, it may not be under those fancy made up names however... Not kidding.
also 19pounds for a brush????


If you are not good with DIY Just get a small tin from Fiddes or Osmo stuff they have similar products but at more reasonable prices, already in your desired shades, good for outdoor stuff straight out of the tin and covers sooo much..
If you want zinc oxide..just buy that stuff, it costs almost nothing from ebay and mix it up yourself..

I would NOT support that business or the people who recommend such stuff at such prices..
If you have already bought, I would suggest to ask for refund/cancel order as that's straight up SCAM.
 

ColeyS1

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Friedrich":2k6dg1i8 said:
What is that website?
I usually don't care about where people spend their money as it's not really my business.
however you deserve to get shafted if you even consider purchasing that stuff at those prices.
Search around, you can get that stuff for 3-10x cheaper, it may not be under those fancy made up names however... Not kidding.
also 19pounds for a brush????


If you are not good with DIY Just get a small tin from Fiddes or Osmo stuff they have similar products but at more reasonable prices, already in your desired shades, good for outdoor stuff straight out of the tin and covers sooo much..
If you want zinc oxide..just buy that stuff, it costs almost nothing from ebay and mix it up yourself..

I would NOT support that business or the people who recommend such stuff at such prices..
If you have already bought, I would suggest to ask for refund/cancel order as that's straight up SCAM.
I wasn't aware osmo sell linseed paint ? Could you provide a link please ?

As it's my first experiment with it, I thought it best to try ready made. Perhaps I'll get my lab coat and test tubes out later if it proves successful.
Thanks for caring for me X
Coley


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ColeyS1

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paulrockliffe":1vyy8p21 said:
I primed using linseed oil, raw not boiled, heated to 70 degrees. Then a tin of paint is £30-40 for a litre, which was enough to do 4 huge planters and a bench, with some left over. I wouldn't bother with the zinc or any fancy brushes.
Isn't it the zinc additive that prevents the mildew and mould though ?- I don't like either :lol:

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Jacob

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I've primed on new/old wood and existing paint with raw linseed oil. Seems to work very well.
Yes the stuff is pricey but it really does go a long way and lasts a long time.
The main thing is your wood won't rot - which is the biggest draw back with modern paints and costs a bomb to rectify - or needs pressure treating with preservative, which even then will still need repainting.
 

ColeyS1

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Jacob":1j3nzxgz said:
I've primed on new/old wood and existing paint with raw linseed oil. Seems to work very well.
Yes the stuff is pricey but it really does go a long way and lasts a long time.
The main thing is your wood won't rot - which is the biggest draw back with modern paints and costs a bomb to rectify - or needs pressure treating with preservative, which even then will still need repainting.
Thanks for the recommendation Jacob. The guy on the phone was super helpful. He spoke to the allback guy in person who suggested priming new wood with the oil was unecessary. I could try my samples with and without the oil/primer if you think it's worthwhile?


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ColeyS1

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Finally got round to putting it on a window this morning. I took off the lid and thought what on earth have I took on here.

It looked a bit like dried up old putty, smell like it aswell ! I plunged the stirring stick in expecting it to be hard work only to discover it was a thin skin and the underneath was nice and runny. I mixed in the additive with some of the paint in a small measuring cup. I took a guess that 150ml would be sufficient for the small window. In the end I had 110ml spare !

As Jacob said, a little goes a long way !! Coverage seemed remarkably good considering I was painting sapele. I'll check every day or so to see how long it takes to dry. Leaving it 3 days between coats wouldn't be that bad. I've known farrow and ball to still be wet after 2 weeks !

Impressed so far, need a crappy softwood project to try it on.
Cheers
Coley

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Jacob

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Traditionally you don't paint the backs of frames. Out of sight - a waste of paint.
Install first as bare wood (or primed with linseed oil - external faces only) and only then paint what you can see. This allows the wood to breathe - water may get in but can also get out seasonally.
 

ColeyS1

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Jacob":221qcgcs said:
Traditionally you don't paint the backs of frames. Out of sight - a waste of paint.
Install first as bare wood (or primed with linseed oil - external faces only) and only then paint what you can see. This allows the wood to breathe - water may get in but can also get out seasonally.
It's a force of habit painting everything Jacob. This is gonna be a sample window that will sit on a shelf in the shop so I'd prefer it to look pretty all around.
One thing the allback guy did say which is slightly different to what you recommend is priming with linseed oil isn't necessary on new unfinished wood. He did say it was beneficial for previously painted surfaces though. If it would give it even better protection I'd have no issue with brushing on a coat. I might give him another ring on Monday just to double check.



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John Brown

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Beau":ga39vzgz said:
Following this with interest as might try it some time. A quick google brings up much cheaper alternatives like this so what have I missed?
https://www.promain.co.uk/the-tradition ... 6MEALw_wcB
I see they do two types, the one you linked to is an emulsion of linseed oil and water. They have a more expensive version that appears to be linseed oil only.

Interested to hear Jacob's take on this, as he seems to be the forum expert.
 

Jacob

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an emulsion of linseed oil and water.
Dunno, no idea. Sounds contradictory though - you are probably paying more for the oil and the water is free!

I imagine that priming with oil only, is going to be cheaper.
It certainly works brilliantly as a primer over existing paint (in my limited experience, may not work with all paints). It sticks well but also seems to stabilise the old paint. I guess it penetrates well and finds its way into cracks and crevices
 

ColeyS1

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Just had a quick look at it. Looks like it's soaked into the end grain really well instead of just sitting on the surface.
Be interesting to see how the next coat (without additive) affects the finish. I guess it won't soak in as much.

Back in the day with exterior joinery i use to allow a 1.5mm gap. A few years ago I upped it to 2mm and have never had to go back to ease any joints. This stuff covers well but seems thin. Perhaps I could revert back to 1.5mm if it becomes a regular thing.

I'm wondering if 2 coats would do, or perhaps 3 would be better. I'll know after the second coat.

"Is it dry yet, is it dry yet is It is it?"

So exciting lol

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Jacob

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Yep it is thin. If you put it on too thick it won't go off - it skins over and you have to sand off the soft bits. Quite easy to do though so it's nothing to worry about, but save the bother (and the paint) by brushing it out as thin as possible.
Thin coats means you can just keep topping up every few years indefinitely. No burning back or scraping. I've taken old joinery out which still has all it's paint still intact -20 layers or more from new 100 years ago or more.
The worst thing you can do to a bit of old joinery is to burn off the old paint and replace with new (edited - modern paint). You would instantly shorten its life to 5 to 10 years.
 
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