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By Blackswanwood
#1345942
I would welcome any advice on workshop lighting.

I am starting from a blank canvas with a new workshop and thinking about using led strip lights or panels. Various manufacturers make various claims about their products being close to/equivalent of daylight.

If anyone can “shed any light“ on whether these claims are correct and/or anything else to look out for I will be grateful.
By Roland
#1345954
Last year I put three led strips into my workshop, and they do look like daylight. They came from CEF rather one of the DIY sheds. Unfortunately I can’t remember what the product is, and I suspect that it will have been superseded by now anyway.
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By DBT85
#1345964
Anything cheap will have the opportunity for variance more than something from an established name, but I know that Gosforth Handyman and Peter Millard both put LED panels up and were both very pleased with them. Theirs were both the same 6500k ones and both shoot a lot of video using them, those came from eBay. The same seller also does them in about 5 other temperatures.

Vids of them putting them up and talking about them.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mwf9t4NPovY
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TrukKsGFGO8
By Inspector
#1345980
1,000 lumens per square metre for detailed workshop light levels and 6,000 Kelvins or above for the whitest light.

Pete
By mbartlett99
#1346010
There's nothing to stop you using any fixture at all and fitting bulbs/tubes/etc at the correct colour temp. 5500K is daylight balanced 2700K tungsten balanced (ie noticeably warm yellow) and above 5500K getting bluer. I use cheap Wickes fluorescent fixtures with 5500k led tubes.

The more expensive bulbs/tubes should be closer to their given colour temp. You can go the whole hog and use led bulbs designed for photographers although its not a cheap option (about 15GBP for a 100W).
By Sideways
#1346054
Probably a personal thing but I find the "cold" looking blue tint associated with 6500 Kelvin lights and the green-violet of many of the cheap, unrated lights to be thoroughly obnoxious.
Walking around the neighborhood in the evening I pass a couple of houses that stand out because they have been refitted with these in their living rooms - it looks like the aliens have landed !
I would, and did pick lights rated between 4000 and 5500K as much easier to live with.
Very warm or cold tinted lights will make it harder to judge colours properly. There is a new number given for some of the better lights now called CRI (colour rendering index) this is a measure of how the light affects the look of colours compared to under natural light. Think : taking a piece of clothing to the shop doorway to check what the colour really is in daylight. A CRI of 90 or more means colours should look pretty accurate, whether the light is a warm or a daylight one.
By Woody2Shoes
#1346069
My 2ds worth:
1 look for luminous efficency of more than 100 lumens light output per watt power input.
2 Look for a colour temperature which is somewhere 3000 to 5000K for task lighting.
3 Look at the CRI (colour registration index) and go for the highest figure you can afford, ideally better than 90. Many cheaper brands have poor cri and this accounts for much of the blue/green harshness. You want the lamp to provide a balance of light wavelengths.
4 IME It's worth paying for a known brand eg Philips or Osram as you have more assurance over reliability and fire safety.
By Woody2Shoes
#1346071
My 2ds worth:
1 look for luminous efficency of more than 100 lumens light output per watt power input.
2 Look for a colour temperature which is somewhere 3000 to 5000K for task lighting.
3 Look at the CRI (colour rendering index) and go for the highest figure you can afford, ideally better than 90. Many cheaper brands have poor cri and this accounts for much of the blue/green harshness. You want the lamp to provide a balance of light wavelengths.
4 IME It's worth paying for a known brand eg Philips or Osram as you have more assurance over reliability and fire safety.