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By KeenDIYer
#1337788
Hi all,

New to the forum so please forgive what will no doubt seem like daft questions.

I'd like to build some alcove cupboards and bookshelves (two in fact). I am quite excited about the project and after reading a fair few threads on here I've managed to successfully NOT go out and buy loads of power tools. I'm chalking this up as a win already!

I posted on here a day or so ago and have decided to get myself a plunge/track saw and a router. This would do everything I need as well as enabling me to practice and improve my skills whilst not spending the earth in the process.

I have bought a lightly used Triton MOF001 online which I'm picking up tomorrow. I plan on getting a 1/2" collet with a couple of cutters just to get me started. My question is in regards to setting it up on a table with a fence. I'm more than happy to give this a go but only if my current toolset enables me to do it to a good standard. If not then I would look to buy a table (preferably with a fence) to mount the router to (recommendations welcome in any case). I guess my question now is, do I buy a ready made router table and fence or do I make one? Are there any detailed guides to make a table?

I have a modest set of tools including a Hitachi mitre saw with an upgraded crosscut blade, a set of DeWalt drills, a Makita jigsaw and a Makita circular saw.

Thank in advance for any help.
User avatar
By MikeJhn
#1337793
I have the full kit UJK router table with the lift and dust box, in eleven years it's never caused me any concern and has worked perfectly, my only suggest is to get a MuscleChuck collet extension, this will hopefully lift high enough to prevent the extremely annoying switch interlock on the Triton Router from engaging when changing bits.
By KeenDIYer
#1337796
Thanks for the reply.

My main concern if I were to attempt to build this myself is getting the fence accurate enough. I either buy the table top with fence or something like this which could fold away quite nicely:

https://www.axminster.co.uk/axminster-f ... kit-717613
User avatar
By Steve Maskery
#1337799
My RT is based on Norm Abrams' design. Much copied and difficult to beat.

My fence is better than his though :) I made mine as a 2-part fence so it has micro-adjustment on it. With a Router Raizer it means that I have full control over the position of the cutter.

Actually my fence has got a little damaged in storage, it's no longer perfectly planar. It's slight, so most of the time it doesn't matter, but I really should get round to re-making it.

If you are shorter on time and deeper of pocket then go and see Peter Sefton, he sells a range of models, all of them good.
By KeenDIYer
#1337803
I will see if I can find the design you've mentioned - thank you.

However this seems like very good value for money currently. Especially with free delivery.

https://woodworkersworkshop.co.uk/produ ... sert-plate

I am awful at making decisions!

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User avatar
By Steve Maskery
#1337808
The description calls it Compact...
Check that it will be big enough for your needs, that is quite small. Mind you, my first RT was the old Elu MOF96 kit. It cost £120 40 years ago and was less than a square foot, as I recall!
Also check that your router will fit it. But if does suit your needs, you can be sure of the quality. Peter doesn't sell tat.

The Norm Abram plans are available in the UK from any BriMarc dealer.
By KeenDIYer
#1337851
For the time being I'd like to get some cabinet doors done so the size will be fine for those I expect.

Still considering making a custom one though. YouTube is awful :)

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User avatar
By MikeG.
#1337853
These things are always over designed. You need a surface of some description, a movable fence, a hole through the table, and not much else. You fix the base of the router to the table with any old bit of something that holds it securely. Here's mine:

Image

Ignore the lift mechanism for a moment, and look at the method of attaching the router base to the underside of the old drawing board:

Image

Six scraps of off cut screwed into the board hold the base tight. The base of the router is let into the underside of the board, and that's a good first job for your new tool, with a straight cutter. Anything more than that is a bonus, and that includes the lift mechanism. My other one has a wooden frame and a bit of threaded rod for height adjustment. This one has a steel frame. Scrap stuff which works every bit as well as any bought router table, for pennies. Don't waste your wood money on tools.
By KeenDIYer
#1337924
Thanks MikeG,

I think you're right. I am over complicating things. I need to start basic and then move up from there slowly.

I'm happy with making the top, it's the positioning of the fence that slightly confuses me. Or should I do away with tracks altogether and just measure and clamp the fence as and when?

Thanks the for the pics, especially the one of the underside of the table.

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By Hornbeam
#1337927
For my first router table my fence was simply held with clamps. Pivoting the fence at one end means that assuming your router bit is mid point on the fence, you only get half the movement at the cutting point as you do at the end so it makes it easier to make small adjustments.
A fence doesnt have to be fancy just a straight softwood batten will do
User avatar
By MikeJhn
#1337928
And then there is this: https://www.rutlands.co.uk/sp+power-too ... naEALw_wcB motor included with lift, variable speed and No volt release, fence is pretty useless, but the addition of the Axminster compact router table fence compensates for that, I did exactly that as a second string table and it works fine, could be a good starting point.
By KeenDIYer
#1337931
Hornbeam wrote:For my first router table my fence was simply held with clamps. Pivoting the fence at one end means that assuming your router bit is mid point on the fence, you only get half the movement at the cutting point as you do at the end so it makes it easier to make small adjustments.
A fence doesnt have to be fancy just a straight softwood batten will do
Thanks. I was thinking about routing in some grooves into the top for some metal rulers. More practice with the router that way too.

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By KeenDIYer
#1337932
MikeJhn wrote:And then there is this: https://www.rutlands.co.uk/sp+power-too ... naEALw_wcB motor included with lift, variable speed and No volt release, fence is pretty useless, but the addition of the Axminster compact router table fence compensates for that, I did exactly that as a second string table and it works fine, could be a good starting point.
Certainly something to think about. I fancy getting my hands dirty though and making tonnes of mistakes along the way. It's the only way I'll learn!

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User avatar
By MikeJhn
#1337935
The problem with just starting out is you don't know if the tools are to blame for the mistakes/misalignment if you can eliminate one of those variables it's worth the effort.