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By mrbadexample
#1339528
I left the paint spot deliberately because I don't think it was accidental. I think it's been marked to show ownership or grade of stone. Something like that, anyway.

I've had a go at sharpening the tenon saw with reasonable success, but it still doesn't seem that sharp. However, I've been quite gentle to start with - I think that it'll improve with successive sharpenings.

There are a couple of little kinks in the blade which don't help. Not that much but enough to make things a bit sticky sometimes. Can this be addressed?
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By ED65
#1339741
mrbadexample wrote:I left the paint spot deliberately because I don't think it was accidental. I think it's been marked to show ownership or grade of stone. Something like that, anyway.

Hadn't thought of that. Could be, it does look very centred now that I look at it.

mrbadexample wrote:...I think that it'll improve with successive sharpenings.

Might well do. The tips of the teeth really do all the cutting and if every one hasn't had its sharp edge restored the saw will cut better but not as well as it could.

When you watch someone who really knows how to sharpen a saw well (like Paul Sellers) using a saw they've sharpened you appreciate just how well these saws can cut. But like the saying goes, even a poorly sharpened saw is better than a blunt saw.

mrbadexample wrote:There are a couple of little kinks in the blade which don't help. Not that much but enough to make things a bit sticky sometimes. Can this be addressed?

If the blade is just slightly wavy you might be able to sort it out by hitting the back of the spine smartly on the workbench. Paul Sellers again has a video where he demonstrates this but I couldn't tell you which one, sorry. I tried this out on one old saw I had which had a slight wave and it worked a treat, completely straight or nearly so in one fell swoop.

If you have identifiable kinks then taking the back off and sorting them independently by hammering, as shown in the Bad Axe PDF, may be needed. But then we're back to removing the plate from the handle really. I suppose you might be able to keep it on but it may not be possible.