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By Jim_Nutt
#1334312
Hi all,

I’m in the middle of making a cabinet and am planning to make shaker style doors with glass in them.

What material and thickness would you use for the glass? Glass or Perspex or something else? Each door is approx 850mm x 250mm.

Many thanks in advance!
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By MikeG.
#1334321
Glass. Glass, glass, glass. Plastic looks like plastic, and in a few years time looks like scuffed plastic.

Shaker style, hey? No-one else ever made frames......
By That would work
#1334324
MikeG. wrote:Glass. Glass, glass, glass. Plastic looks like plastic, and in a few years time looks like scuffed plastic.

Shaker style, hey? No-one else ever made frames......


"Shaker"..... possibly one of the most overused descriptors of furniture ever! Shame really because there certainly is a style that was Shaker but it now seems to be used to describe any 'simple' framed door etc.
By Mike Jordan
#1334326
If agree that plastic is a poor choice, the real choice is between toughened with about a weeks wait and laminated which is cut while you wait normally.
If broken the toughened will shatter into pea sized pieces and fall out of the frame, the laminated will crack but stay in place in the frame. Locally to me the laminated is slightly cheaper.
By Jim_Nutt
#1334333
That would work wrote:I wouldn't use acrylic just because of its static dust collecting ability. Have you thought about using old looking glass?, that would be more authentic looking I would say.


Sounds interesting - can elaborate on what you mean by old looking glass? Literally old glass that’s come out of something else?
By That would work
#1334334
From glass merchants it's possible to buy glass that replicates old glass in that it appears to be less flat than modern and with minor imperfections. You would need to enquire locally.
By Jim_Nutt
#1334335
That would work wrote:From glass merchants it's possible to buy glass that replicates old glass in that it appears to be less flat than modern and with minor imperfections. You would need to enquire locally.


That’s great, thank you. I had no idea such a thing existed. I’ll see what I can find.
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By Brandlin
#1334339
Jim_Nutt wrote:
That would work wrote:From glass merchants it's possible to buy glass that replicates old glass in that it appears to be less flat than modern and with minor imperfections. You would need to enquire locally.


That’s great, thank you. I had no idea such a thing existed. I’ll see what I can find.


I've seen it called antique glass, lead glass (wrongly) and non-float glass in a couple of glass suppliers. It might be that the names are traditional or regional, so your local supplier may have several names
By Jim_Nutt
#1334347
Brandlin wrote:
I've seen it called antique glass, lead glass (wrongly) and non-float glass in a couple of glass suppliers. It might be that the names are traditional or regional, so your local supplier may have several names


Cheers Brandlin, this is really helpful info!
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By woodbloke66
#1334356
Unless you're going to give it, or expect it sustain some serious abuse, ordinary 4mm window glass will do. I've made a few cabinets/bookcases over the years with glass panels or doors and not one has come to any grief. The same goes for shelves in display cabinets or similar - Rob
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By MikeG.
#1334357
Horticultural glass has often been used as a substitute for "antique" glass. It has more imperfections in it, and has the added bonus of being cheaper than ordinary glass. I agree with Rob, above, on the proviso that the glass isn't within reach of toddlers.