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Glass or Perspex for cabinet doors

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Jim_Nutt

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Hi all,

I’m in the middle of making a cabinet and am planning to make shaker style doors with glass in them.

What material and thickness would you use for the glass? Glass or Perspex or something else? Each door is approx 850mm x 250mm.

Many thanks in advance!
 

That would work

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I wouldn't use acrylic just because of its static dust collecting ability. Have you thought about using old looking glass?, that would be more authentic looking I would say.
 

MikeG.

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Glass. Glass, glass, glass. Plastic looks like plastic, and in a few years time looks like scuffed plastic.

Shaker style, hey? No-one else ever made frames......
 

That would work

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MikeG.":1haolqj9 said:
Glass. Glass, glass, glass. Plastic looks like plastic, and in a few years time looks like scuffed plastic.

Shaker style, hey? No-one else ever made frames......
"Shaker"..... possibly one of the most overused descriptors of furniture ever! Shame really because there certainly is a style that was Shaker but it now seems to be used to describe any 'simple' framed door etc.
 

Mike Jordan

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If agree that plastic is a poor choice, the real choice is between toughened with about a weeks wait and laminated which is cut while you wait normally.
If broken the toughened will shatter into pea sized pieces and fall out of the frame, the laminated will crack but stay in place in the frame. Locally to me the laminated is slightly cheaper.
 

Jim_Nutt

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Thank you all for your replies, it’s much appreciated.

What thickness glass would you recommend and can you recommend any online suppliers?

Thanks again.
 

Jim_Nutt

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That would work":1y8hxfhz said:
I wouldn't use acrylic just because of its static dust collecting ability. Have you thought about using old looking glass?, that would be more authentic looking I would say.
Sounds interesting - can elaborate on what you mean by old looking glass? Literally old glass that’s come out of something else?
 

That would work

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From glass merchants it's possible to buy glass that replicates old glass in that it appears to be less flat than modern and with minor imperfections. You would need to enquire locally.
 

Jim_Nutt

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That would work":3nt8528s said:
From glass merchants it's possible to buy glass that replicates old glass in that it appears to be less flat than modern and with minor imperfections. You would need to enquire locally.
That’s great, thank you. I had no idea such a thing existed. I’ll see what I can find.
 

Brandlin

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Jim_Nutt":28fnaepd said:
That would work":28fnaepd said:
From glass merchants it's possible to buy glass that replicates old glass in that it appears to be less flat than modern and with minor imperfections. You would need to enquire locally.
That’s great, thank you. I had no idea such a thing existed. I’ll see what I can find.
I've seen it called antique glass, lead glass (wrongly) and non-float glass in a couple of glass suppliers. It might be that the names are traditional or regional, so your local supplier may have several names
 

Jim_Nutt

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Brandlin":3mgylhbh said:
I've seen it called antique glass, lead glass (wrongly) and non-float glass in a couple of glass suppliers. It might be that the names are traditional or regional, so your local supplier may have several names
Cheers Brandlin, this is really helpful info!
 

Tris

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Laminated is significantly thicker, and therefore heavier, than toughened. Not sure if this affects your design at all but worth considering.
 

woodbloke66

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Unless you're going to give it, or expect it sustain some serious abuse, ordinary 4mm window glass will do. I've made a few cabinets/bookcases over the years with glass panels or doors and not one has come to any grief. The same goes for shelves in display cabinets or similar - Rob
 

MikeG.

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Horticultural glass has often been used as a substitute for "antique" glass. It has more imperfections in it, and has the added bonus of being cheaper than ordinary glass. I agree with Rob, above, on the proviso that the glass isn't within reach of toddlers.
 

Mike Jordan

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Don't be tempted to use float glass or any other non safety glass, look at the glass and glazing federation guidelines. An adult can be seriously injured by a breakage of glass in a door, just imagine what could happen to a child!
Only a fool would take the risk to save a few quid.
I use 6.4 laminated glass for use in boat furnishings but I have been offered 4.4 thickness lam in the past.
Anyone working commercially should also think about the insurers reaction to any claim.
 

woodbloke66

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MikeG.":38dshle4 said:
I agree with Rob, above, on the proviso that the glass isn't within reach of toddlers.
That's the only caveat Mike and thus far, no toddlers have been near the cabinets. I'm just wondering though how vulnerable are my two Japanese floor lamps with shoji paper panels? :lol: - Rob
 

Mike Jordan

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Sorry about the rather strident tone in my last post but this is a frequent area of irritation to me. I always quote in advance for work and frequently get a return email suggesting that using float glass rather than lam will show a saving. On most of my products it would! But only a saving of about £20 on a £500 item, truly a false economy.
 

Doug71

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I am surprised that anyone would recommend anything other then safety glass, it sounds like the panes will only be narrow but I would still use 4 mm toughened glass. Open doors get knocked, doors get closed on to things that are protruding out of the cabinet, doors can fall open if you move the cabinet etc. Toughened glass has a stamp on it to show it is toughened but you can request a furniture mark instead which is just a line.

MikeG.":13shcg8f said:
Horticultural glass has often been used as a substitute for "antique" glass. It has more imperfections in it, and has the added bonus of being cheaper than ordinary glass.
I used to use horticultural glass in windows to look like old glass but I find the modern horticultural glass is not as clear as it used to be, it often has a slight milky haze to it (from my supplier anyway).
 

MikeG.

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Doug71":30cw9n50 said:
I am surprised that anyone would recommend anything other then safety glass, it sounds like the panes will only be narrow.......
Everyone thinks that "safety glazing" in the Building Regulations means either toughened or laminated. Well, it doesn't. There are other ways of showing compliance, one of which is to have small panes. From memory, there is a maximum width of 250mm and a maximum area of something like 1/2 a sq metre to fall within the category of "small" for the purposes of safety glazing. That's surprisingly big. If it is good enough for a house door, then it's good enough for a cupboard door.
 
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