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sparkus88

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Hi I am hoping to build an 11x8 workshop. I found a plan which uses mostly 4"x2" but will look into buying a shed I noticed most places use near 2"x1" for most of the frame work. My question my roof will be heavier than theirs because of insulation and plywood boards, also I'm hoping to be able to store wood in apex roof space. So will 2x1 be strong enough. Next question is about cladding, its seems very expensive. I figured I would need around 20-25 sqm for my shed and the cost seems to be as much as the cost of all of the the rest of the wood. Is this right or am I looking in the wrong place?

Mark
 

condeesteso

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Hi Mark - I've done quite a few of these, from off-the-shelf sheds (modified) to do-my-own. 11 x 8 is a fair size, and I would definitely avoid a stock shed. May I suggest tannelised 4 x 2 (maybe 3 x 2 for the wall frames) - it's quite cheap. Then roofing slats (38 x 25 I think), ripped down the middle, nailed to the bigger frame to apply the panelling to. F'edge for walls, or shiplap if you fancy posh. This way you get it just how you want rather than taking a shed and modifying it.
Make sure the base is off the ground (4" is well-enough) and lay a dpm sheet under, have a decent overhang off the roof (9"), and sheet the inside (with cheap insulation between outer and inner). Also run a layer of breathable membrane under the outer cladding - can't have a workshop that is too dry, not possible here in the U.K.!!

The frame is the main start-point - look to the local builders merchants for 'C16 grade' tannelised framing timber. And I would guess that the surface covering will be half the budget - be that f'edge, shiplap whatever. But you will get more of what you want doing it from scratch, sheds aren't a good place to start I feel.
 

sparkus88

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I was looking at cladding on wickes and they have types that can be used externally like http://www.wickes.co.uk/invt/128462 which costs £17/sqm and ones for interior use only like http://www.wickes.co.uk/invt/121320 which is £7/sqm. The only difference I can see between the 2 is the thickness which is 14mm and 8mm respectively. Wouldn't 8mm be suitable for my purpose once its been treated?
 

condeesteso

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If this was mine I would consider the 8mm, with a few buts. It's not the thickness worries, but this is speed-grown and fast dried... one up from balsa. I think it would be worth phoning some merchants and haggling first, or consider featheredge as a low-cost alternative? If you use the 8mm I would design so it fits vertically (battens horizontal then) and definitely lay a breathable under (roofing membrane), and as you say treat both sides. Vertical will drain and air better, and keep to the min 4 inches off ground with air under the structure. A sheet of basic dpm under the whole thing keeps ground moisture away and supresses weeds etc... anything at all to keep moisture from the structure.
An alternative skin (aesthetics aside maybe) could be external ply sheets - prob even less than £7 a sq metre for that stuff. Stained it could look OK, could always pin thin batten on outside to create a panelled effect.
 

jack55

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hi. I found cladding to be a big expense when I did mine. To use T&G was going to cost just over £900 for 18mm. So i opted for rough sawn 150mm x 25mm treated soft wood and fixed vertically as a board and batten. The cost was only a quarter of the T&G and being treated it should last for a good while.
 

sparkus88

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yeah Mark I saw your post and thats what made my mind up to make my own rather than buy. For the walls what thickness of plywood is ok, would 12mm be able to hold any storage I might fix to it in the future. Also is 18mm thick enough for the floor or should I use 25mm?
 

Benchwayze

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jack55":1s7wq5vw said:
hi. I found cladding to be a big expense when I did mine. To use T&G was going to cost just over £900 for 18mm. So i opted for rough sawn 150mm x 25mm treated soft wood and fixed vertically as a board and batten. The cost was only a quarter of the T&G and being treated it should last for a good while.

That's what I considered... (I was going to rebate one edge so I could overlap). But the Council said, because of fire risks, I couldn't have a wooden shed within 15 metres of my house. So without permission from SWMBO to build in the garden, I shall have to look for a metal shed. Fortunately it's just for storage.

John :D
 

The Bear

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The ply in my walls and floor are both 18mm.

Don't think you need any thicker for the floor if the joists are like mine, but wouldn't go less.

12mm would be fine for the walls. When screwing stuff to the walls later just make sure your screws have plenty of thread up to the head so you get a good hold.

I got the ply second hand. If you need to buy new and want to save some money, OSB (sterling board) would do just as good a job as ply. If you want to use ply, shuttering grade if fine since none of it will be exposed to the weather in the long term.

Mark
 

sparkus88

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thanks for all the help so far. I'm sure there will be more questions in the future because there is SWMB Convinced I need this shed. Another question for is I was thinking of storing wood in the roof space. The plan I'm loosely following, http://www.buildeazy.com/shed_1.html, suggests a 18 degree roof. Whats the limit to the roof angle? I was thinking 30 degrees would give alot more space.

Mark
 

woodbloke

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Think also about marine ply for the exterior of the 'shop...it's pretty bullet proof and not too expensive. I've used 6mm on mine and it's been up in our great British weather now for several years with no ill effects - Rob
 

mailee

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I think you will find for an apex shed roof around 30-35 degrees is the norm. A steeper angle also makes sure things like snow slide off easily, now that can be pretty heavy stuff. I used to store my wood in the rafters of my shed very handy. :wink:
 
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