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Working out what timber is needed for a job??

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Stormer1940

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Hi I need to make a solid front door from European Oak.

The dimensions of the door is 1981 x 813 x 44 and is a solid construction i.e. no panels just solid 44mm timber all the way through the door.

What is the best way or formula to use to work out cubic ft or meter of timber needed for the job?

Struggling to get my head around this one lol...

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks
 

adidat

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sunny somerset!
convert the measurements into imperial so divide the mm numbers by 25.4 =

77.9" x 32" x 1.7" = 4237.6

4237.6 dived by 1728 which is the amount of cubic inches in a cubic foot (e.g 12" x 12" x 12" = 1728) = 2.45 cubic feet

tadaa

these calcs are a bit rough so double check but the understanding ias all there

adidat
 

adidat

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sunny somerset!
convert the measurements into imperial so divide the mm numbers by 25.4 =

77.9" x 32" x 1.7" = 4237.6

4237.6 dived by 1728 which is the amount of cubic inches in a cubic foot (e.g 12" x 12" x 12" = 1728) = 2.45 cubic feet

tadaa

these calcs are a bit rough so double check but the understanding ias all there

adidat
 

adidat

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sunny somerset!
convert the measurements into imperial so divide the mm numbers by 25.4 =

77.9" x 32" x 1.7" = 4237.6

4237.6 dived by 1728 which is the amount of cubic inches in a cubic foot (e.g 12" x 12" x 12" = 1728) = 2.45 cubic feet

tadaa

these calcs are a bit rough so double check but the understanding ias all there

adidat
 

adidat

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sunny somerset!
convert the measurements into imperial so divide the mm numbers by 25.4 =

77.9" x 32" x 1.7" = 4237.6

4237.6 dived by 1728 which is the amount of cubic inches in a cubic foot (e.g 12" x 12" x 12" = 1728) = 2.45 cubic feet

tadaa

these calcs are a bit rough so double check but the understanding ias all there

adidat
 

adidat

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sunny somerset!
convert the measurements into imperial so divide the mm numbers by 25.4 =

77.9" x 32" x 1.7" = 4237.6

4237.6 dived by 1728 which is the amount of cubic inches in a cubic foot (e.g 12" x 12" x 12" = 1728) = 2.45 cubic feet

tadaa

these calcs are a bit rough so double check but the understanding ias all there

adidat
 

adidat

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sunny somerset!
convert the measurements into imperial so divide the mm numbers by 25.4 =

77.9" x 32" x 1.7" = 4237.6

4237.6 dived by 1728 which is the amount of cubic inches in a cubic foot (e.g 12" x 12" x 12" = 1728) = 2.45 cubic feet

tadaa

these calcs are a bit rough so double check but the understanding ias all there

adidat
 

adidat

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sunny somerset!
convert the measurements into imperial so divide the mm numbers by 25.4 =

77.9" x 32" x 1.7" = 4237.6

4237.6 dived by 1728 which is the amount of cubic inches in a cubic foot (e.g 12" x 12" x 12" = 1728) = 2.45 cubic feet

tadaa

these calcs are a bit rough so double check but the understanding ias all there

adidat
 

adidat

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sunny somerset!
convert the measurements into imperial so divide the mm numbers by 25.4 =

77.9" x 32" x 1.7" = 4237.6

4237.6 dived by 1728 which is the amount of cubic inches in a cubic foot (e.g 12" x 12" x 12" = 1728) = 2.45 cubic feet

tadaa

these calcs are a bit rough so double check but the understanding ias all there

adidat
 

adidat

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sunny somerset!
convert the measurements into imperial so divide the mm numbers by 25.4 =

77.9" x 32" x 1.7" = 4237.6

4237.6 dived by 1728 which is the amount of cubic inches in a cubic foot (e.g 12" x 12" x 12" = 1728) = 2.45 cubic feet

tadaa

these calcs are a bit rough so double check but the understanding ias all there

adidat
 

adidat

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sunny somerset!
convert the measurements into imperial so divide the mm numbers by 25.4 =

77.9" x 32" x 1.7" = 4237.6

4237.6 dived by 1728 which is the amount of cubic inches in a cubic foot (e.g 12" x 12" x 12" = 1728) = 2.45 cubic feet

tadaa

these calcs are a bit rough so double check but the understanding ias all there

adidat
 

adidat

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10 posts

thats impressive #-o

stupid computer

maybe a mod could clean this up sorry!

adidat
 

Stormer1940

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I wondered why it said 12 replies lol. Cheers for the info has helped alot...

So if I convert my figures that includes wastage to m3 I get 0.131m3??? So for example Euro oak prime square edge is £1800m3. Do I just do 1800 x 0.131 to get the cost or is that wrong?
 

=Adam=

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I would say that your logic with regards to the price should be correct, however it is worth checking with the supplier as the price for a cube may be cheaper than buying a cubes worth of individual boards (if you understand). They could be offering a bulk discount on a m3.

But in theory your math should be correct.
 

Stormer1940

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Cheers Adam I will do that I think.. I'll give them the qty and then let them do the rest for final price.
 

SBJ

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Hey stormer, I'm intrigued as to the design of your door. If you are glueing up solid boards across the width of the door you are going to experience a lot of movement and potentially a lot of trouble sometime in the future.

AS regards to working out your timber requirements, you need to go into a bit more detail if you are going to place an order and not be disappointed. Make a cutting list of all the components that you require in the finished door. If you are buying sawn stock, you then need to add your wastage to your finished dimensions. For the thickness, if you are going to end up at 44mm you need to order 50mm stock. On the width, timber comes in increments of 25mm widths, so if you want 190mm width you need to add 6mm for machining and then choose the next available size up i.e. 200mm. For the length, boards come in 300mm increments so you need to choose the appropriate length, so for you 1981 you need to add at least 100mm to each end for machining (snipe from the planer) so you will need to order 2.4m lengths.

You will now have an order list that you can take/send to the yard for your timber. They will then pick the stock to your dimensions as near as possible, depending on stock. If they don't have any 2.4s you might have to take 2.7s or 3.0s, same in the width, you might want 150mm wide boards but they might only have 175mm or 200mm so you need to be prepared for this. If it all comes in over sized you might be in for a shock, but you can always say no.

HTH

Stuart
 

Stormer1940

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Hi SBJ thanks for the info...

The door that I was looking at making was one like this



I was thinking about constructing the door like you would with a normal door i.e. Top rail and bottom rail M+T and haunched and the boards in between slotted together with a larger than normal T+ G system allowing space for movement.. Where the glass is going I was thinking about running strips of oak up the edges of the oak boards mitring in the corners and fixing with screws to form a housing for the glass that then will all be covered up with the beading

The design of it is still being thought about so what I have suggested may or may not work. Any design tips would be appreciated here :D

Thanks Stormer
 

tomatwark

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I would suspect that the door in the picture has an engineered core to at least the centre panel.

You will get a lot of movement on the panel if you do that in solid wood, and if the boards expand to much it could cause the sealed unit to fail.

Tom
 

Stormer1940

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Even if there was space in the rebate for movement and bedding the glass in glazing silicone or is the oak going to move that much that it will cause it to crack??? Starting to think that it may be easier to suggest that there was no glass if that is the case.
 

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