Quantcast
  • We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

WIP: 6mx3m Pent Workshop build: Exterior Done!

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Fitzroy

All the gear...
Joined
12 Mar 2013
Messages
1,260
Reaction score
196
Location
Aberdeen
Cladding is not treated, just local sawn larch, that hopefully is semi durable, and with a well drained design (I hope) will weather well to a nice silver hue.
 

Fitzroy

All the gear...
Joined
12 Mar 2013
Messages
1,260
Reaction score
196
Location
Aberdeen
6th Feb 2017, a long overdue update. I'd really wanted to wait until I had the outside completely finished but due to illness that may now be sometime. I can manage an hour or two in a weekend before I'm forced to retire head spinning and heart racing, ho hum. So i'll post an update now and perhaps your words of support will give me some extra oompf.

All the images are from progress over December. In Jan I've taken the door off and rehung in the correct position, same size gap all the way around with door lining and cill in place, but that's all.

Glazing beads were made on the planer from larch off-cuts. After i made them they were brought inside with the windows were they proceeded to go bananas, they bowed so much it was unbelievable, you can see a little of what was to come at the far end of the planer!
057. Making Beads.JPG

058. Glazing Beads.JPG

Thankfully they were flexible enough to be pushed in to place when I glazed the windows. The windows had a continuous low modulus silicone bead gunned into the rebate, before the glazed unit was lowered into place and pushed into the silicone. Plastic packers were placed into the gap between DGU and frame, a bead of silicone gunned between DGU and frame, and the glazing beads pushed into the silicone, and nailed in place with copper nails. I had to drill pilot holes in the glazing beads as there was some splitting on the tests in conducted. I used nearly a tube of silicone per window!
059. Tall Windows Glazed.JPG

The windows were left in the house for the silicone to cure prior to being taken out to the shed where the glazing beads were planed flush to the frame and the excess silicone was trimmed off with a sharp craft knife. My rebates were 40mm for a 22mm DGU, the 18mm was only just enough for two beds of silicone and a glazing bead that ended up at at 15mm deep, which felt pretty insubstantial. If I did it again i'd add 5mm more to the rebate depth.
060. Window Finishing.JPG

Windows were centered in the openings using wooden shims then screwed in-place with screws through the stud-work and into the outside edge of the window frames, so no screw-holes will be seen once the internal finish is in place, however if I ever want to remove them it'll be a pain. The shed membrane was folded outwards and bitumen based flashband used around the window to provide a secondary weather seal behind the cladding. The detail overlap of the flashband was made up on the fly on the basis of water running down doesn't get behind the window.
063. Window In.JPG

062. Window Fitting.JPG

At the top of the window the flash band was folded in half and pushed into the gap. a stick with an angled end was used to ensure everything was adhered. On the big window I took the cladding batten off and the flashband went behind the membrane and cladding battens. But there is a good roof overhang on the front of the shed and I don't expect the widow to see much rain a the top edge.
064. Window Top edge.JPG

061. Window Fitting.JPG

On the cills, the flashband was folded in again in 'V' shape and push back into the gap between the underside of the cill and the angled cladding batten.
065. Window Cill.JPG

Finally the gap was foamed up with low expansion building foam and trimmed off flush once set. Overall it seems that building is about multiple barriers, the cladding keeps the rain off, but if it gets through the membrane and flashband is barrier 2, if it get past that the spray foam is barrier 3.
066. Window Foam.JPG


cont. next post.
 

Attachments

Fitzroy

All the gear...
Joined
12 Mar 2013
Messages
1,260
Reaction score
196
Location
Aberdeen
6th Feb 2017 update cont.

With the tall windows in the look of the place is starting to fit my mental image. The cladding battens sit on top of the flashband and and profiled piece with a drip edge covers the top edge.
067. Windows In.JPG

068. Windows In.JPG

Making all these profiles is interesting and fun, but takes time!
069. Window Top Profile.JPG

It was getting dark pretty early in mid December and I had to fit a temporary light so that I could get a little more work done than the daylight hours permitted.
070. Let there be light.JPG

The window detail on the big picture window shows the top profile (deeper due to the greater rain exposure) and how nicely the douglas fir windows and larch cladding sit together.
071. Big Window Detail.JPG

072. Big Window Detail.JPG

Hanging the door was not too much bother and I (all 100kg) can stand on the far end with not much deflection. The cladding, insulation et
With the widows in, it was back to making cladding. This time the narrow cover strips for the 'board and batten' cladding pattern, these all require thicknessing, straight edging on the planer, cutting to width then thicknessing at 70mm(ish) as my table saw left burn marks. It all just takes time and makes plenty more sawdust and shavings.
073. More Cladding.JPG

Finally the cladding was pretty much done, with only the door to clad, which first i need to make. The door lintel made a great place to capture dimensions, I'm forever loosing bits of paper so this way I know where to find it. The door is effectively a movable wall panel, made out of 4x2 stud work and hung on gate pin and strap hinges. The door panel is clad in larch, the door frame has larch linings and there are the meeting rebates, so the door has to be a fair bit smaller than the opening. I measured and calculated so many times, as if the door is too big i'm pineappled.
074. Door Thinking.JPG

078. Door.JPG

079. Year End.JPG

Hanging the door was pretty easy and I (all 100kg) can hang on the far end with little deflection, there is an internal diagonal member in addition to the OSB cladding that prevents sagging. The external cladding, insulation and internal plasterboard total about 50kg so i think it will work. The door does have a little twist in it, the top left corner is about 1cm closer to the shed than the bottom left corner, however with minimal effort I can deflect it out so i think it'll be ok to close it.

I have also made a cill, which involved much frankenclamping to glue two board together, but I'll save that for next time. Once the door is clad, the base boards are on, and the final roof details (EPDM fixed over soffits) completed then the exterior is finished. In good health it's a few days work, but I fear it'll be a few months in reality.

Wish me luck.

Fitz,
 

Attachments

Charlie Woody

Established Member
Joined
10 Dec 2010
Messages
871
Reaction score
0
Location
West Devon
Sorry to hear you are having health problems, hope you recover fully quickly.

Great attention to detail in your build, ( and your posts ) and it looks a lovely building, well done.
 

Fitzroy

All the gear...
Joined
12 Mar 2013
Messages
1,260
Reaction score
196
Location
Aberdeen
Found a few hours in the quickly lengthening Aberdeen days to get the door linings on, the door perimeter/edge boards on, external membrane in-place, and cross battens fitted.

It's been pretty windy up here the last couple of months and the tarp over the top has threatened to blow away a number of times, eyelets are pulled out etc. The EPDM roof has been on since summer and is glued to the deck but not to the soffits, i'd left the tarp on to stop the wind trying to lift the overhanging EPDM and peel the whole lot off. Took the opportunity to temporarily secure the overhanging EPDM with some battens and get the tarp off which means the building is a whole lot prettier and my garden looks less like a building site, neighbours will happier! Annoyingly the tarp rubbing on one of the corners all winter has worn through the EPDM and left a tiny hole, so superglued a patch over it, will do a better fix in the summer. Rather raises a question over the toughness of the EPDM.
080. Door 1.JPG

Membrane covers everything, hinges and all, the cladding is outside of the hinges so should be ok. Still working out how best to do the cladding around the hinge pin plates.
081. Door 2.JPG


Onwards and upwards

Fitz.
 

Attachments

Fitzroy

All the gear...
Joined
12 Mar 2013
Messages
1,260
Reaction score
196
Location
Aberdeen
Shed door had cross battens added and a header/drip edge made.
22 Door battens.JPG

23 Door Header.JPG

Somehow managed to get my depths wrong on the hinges/cross battens so had to rebate the back of the cladding to fit over the hinges. I used the table saw with a cross cut sled, which made trenching out the rebates quick and accurate, a quick clean up with a shoulder plane and they fit great.
24 Cladding Rebate.JPG

Had to jig things about a bit to fit around the hinge pin and have to say I not totally satisfied as there is definitely an entry point for the rain. May have to see if I can sort some kind of gaiter out of the spare EPDM to prevent rain ingress.
25 Hinge Pin.JPG

First layer of cladding all done.
26 Door Clad.JPG

Amazing how much the colour of the larch changes after it is exposed for a few weeks. The freshly planed door timbers are so much lighter than the orange/pink of the stuff that's been up for a while. SHMBO doesn't particularly like the current colour, i haven't the heart to tell her it'll be a few years before it is the silver colour she wants.
27 Shed .JPG


Fitz.

Edit: No idea why the images are all sideways, grrr... They seem to be the right way up when clicked though.
 

Attachments

mindthatwhatouch

Established Member
Joined
16 Jan 2013
Messages
417
Reaction score
22
Location
sussex
Wish I could have had timber cladding, so tell the misses it could be worse. Nice cladding.
Could you fix a cladding board over the hinge itself?
 

Fitzroy

All the gear...
Joined
12 Mar 2013
Messages
1,260
Reaction score
196
Location
Aberdeen
Few more hours spent making cladding strips for the door, but finally all the board and batten cladding is complete! I've learnt I am very inefficient when it comes to using the thicknesser, i must have put every length through at least 6 times, i purchased 500 linear meters so i've planned about 3km of larch surface. I need to learn how to do less passes, well I would if I ever planned to make another shed!
Shed 1.jpg

shed 2.jpg


Left to do: glue roof edges and batten a drip edge all round, there are a few gaps in the soffits to cover, need to do the base boards scribed to the ground, fit door returns, weather strip and locks.

Baby steps each weekend is the way forwards.

F.
 

Attachments

Fitzroy

All the gear...
Joined
12 Mar 2013
Messages
1,260
Reaction score
196
Location
Aberdeen
Ahead of myself again I'd been thinking about the floor as the OSB is butt ugly! I found a guy selling exdisplay wood flooring sample boards, for £80 inc delivery I couldn't say no for a little over 25m2 of boards, 3/4" solid wood mix of species and finishes. Delivered when I was out which was lucky as I'd likely have told the chap to be on his bike, they obviously been stored in an exposed location with most of them showing signs of damp. Anyhow once the temper abated I think for a workshop they'll be fine once dry, and for the price I can't grumble. Plan to do a random finish effect that I hope will work.
IMG_3780.JPG


I've also been mulling the roof edges, the top deck is all glued up but the side faces have been temporarily battened since last year. I finally settled on a profiled batten that forms a drip edge on the overhang, I don't really want gutters. Made all the battens and glued and fixed the front edge, it's given the place the sharp line I wanted for the roof.
IMG_3781.JPG

IMG_3782.JPG

Somewhat concerned that the batten only being 12mm x 5mm it won't weather well, as with many of my decisions history will be the judge.

F.
 

Attachments

yeungster79

Established Member
Joined
18 Nov 2016
Messages
30
Reaction score
0
Location
Edinburgh
Looking awesome Fitz, love the detail around the windows and doors top work.

Larch looks stunning already.
 

Fitzroy

All the gear...
Joined
12 Mar 2013
Messages
1,260
Reaction score
196
Location
Aberdeen
Plan to. 100mm insulation in 150mm joist, 50mm gap above, front and rear overhangs will have vents with insect mesh to prevent bugs getting in.

F.
 

Fitzroy

All the gear...
Joined
12 Mar 2013
Messages
1,260
Reaction score
196
Location
Aberdeen
Door is completed and finally I can lock the place up, roof edges are done and take a look at my awesome workbench!

I used aquamac 21 seal to give me a good seal around the door perimeter. I want the workshop to be as airtight as possible so that the dehumidifier can keep the place at a decent/constant)(ish) humidity, minimising the impact on timber and tools. Seal was £10 for £10 meters off eBay.
28 Door Seal.JPG


Seal uses a 2.7mm recess to push fit into, turns out most table saw blades are about the same.
30 Seal Recess.JPG


My table saw is an old beast with minimal guarding but managed to rig something up that pretty much eliminated the chance of coming in contact with the blade.
29 Guarding.JPG


Seal push fits in the gap, found the ends didn't want to stay put at times but a little superglue fixed that.
31 Seal Fitted.JPG


Once the door seal was fitted I sized the timber to fit around the door perimeter and fill the gap between door and frame. Turned out either the door or opening were not square by about 3-5mm so took a fair bit of hand planing bespoke fit each side, top and bottom.
32 Door Seal.JPG

33 All Fitted.JPG


The depth of the door (150mm) and the closing circle from the hinge meant that I had to profile the edge board of the door, which was a real pain but got it fitted in the end. The door is also marginally twisted, with the bottom left corner protruding about 10mm further out. The lock is fitted to the same corner and it's easy enough to push the door flush and close the lock.
34 Door Edge.JPG

Eventually there will be a lock top and bottom and a latching handle in the middle so you can close the door to whilst inside, but for now at least it has a lock on it!
35 Locked at Last.JPG


I also fitted the final roof edging.
36 Roof Edge.jpg


Whilst sitting eating my lunch I thought i'd share a picture of the 'workbench' i've been using during the build. Last summer my boys asked for a 'house' they could play in so I screwed a few off cuts of framing timber and OSB together, lay a board on top and called it a house. After bringing it in from the weather at the end of the day i started to use it as a workbench. It's out of level and square, and very rickety, but it's now screwed to the floor by one leg, and braced against the shed wall via board offcuts lying on the floor and it's good enough to let me, saw to length, plane edges, and sand. I'm actually amazed at how simple, and out of cock, a bench can be and still be functional.
37 Workbench.JPG


Cheers

Fitz.

PS. Again photos are displaying odd, the are all the correct way up in my computer and when you click on them, but are upside down on the forum post. No idea how to fix, gah!
 

Attachments

Fitzroy

All the gear...
Joined
12 Mar 2013
Messages
1,260
Reaction score
196
Location
Aberdeen
the end is nigh, the end is nigh, thank goodness!

In the last episode I was doing roof edging, and I noticed a number of wasps entering through this gap in the soffit. They got in then got stuck in the shed, i'd made a shed lobster pot for wasps!


I'd always planned to remedy this by covering the vent with insect mesh, once the inside is complete it'll be a ventilated cold roof. The drilling of many holes and stapling of insect mesh commenced.
38 Vent.JPG

39 Vent 2.JPG

40 vent complete.JPG


I'm 50:50 on the looks, and may open connect some of the holes to make elongated ovals. I also plan to put led light fittings in the cavity behind the vents to give some light at night at the shed end of the garden.

Base boards were scribed and cut to close up the gap to the lawn, eventually the shed will be surrounded by 30-50mm scottish pebbles, enclosed by some old sleepers. That should provide a free draining area that's easy to keep tidy and prevents animals burrowing under the shed. Altough the neighbors two cats seem pretty good at extinction level control of local ground mammals, poor things.

41 baseboard and done.jpg


So that's basically the outside done. It's virtually a year since I started clearing ground and it's been much harder work than I expected, but i'm well chuffed with the end result. Plan to have a bit of a break until I make a crack at the inside. Thanks for all your support, and advice over the last 12 months.

Fitz.
 

Attachments

John Brown

Established Member
Joined
25 Sep 2008
Messages
1,643
Reaction score
39
Location
Stinchcombe, Gloucestershire
"PS. Schoolboy errors I think I've made.
1. OSB to the edge of the frame! But i couldn't be pineappled to cut noggins for all the board edges and cut the boards to size. With the frame at 6m x 3m and using 1.2x2.4 metric boards there were zero board length cuts."
I know this is an old thread, but what is the downside of having the OSB floor go to the edge of the frame?
 

Fitzroy

All the gear...
Joined
12 Mar 2013
Messages
1,260
Reaction score
196
Location
Aberdeen
The wall frames are sitting on the floor which means you can never lift a floor board. The other thing is you have end grain of the OSB on the edge, and end grain likes moisture, if any gets past the cladding and breather membrane I can see it wicking into the floor.

Also I’ve never seen it in another build, which tends to mean its abnormal, and seeing as so many sheds are built every year abnormal normally means wrong

I did it this way as it was easy and I didn’t spot it until all rather late in the day.

Fitz.
 

John Brown

Established Member
Joined
25 Sep 2008
Messages
1,643
Reaction score
39
Location
Stinchcombe, Gloucestershire
Ok
Thanks.
Looking at what I wiil have, I'd need to double up the exterior frame to form a solid base for the walls, plus noggins for the flooring, so effectively three ply 2 x 6 timber at the perimeter. I think I might take my chances with t and g OSB3 all the way to the edge. Lifting a floorboard anywhere other than at the wall would be no more difficult, and I'm not sure that OSB has endgrain as such, being resin bonded.
But thanks for taking the time to reply.

John
 

Inspector

Nyuck, Nyuck, Nyuck!
Joined
18 Jun 2006
Messages
1,779
Reaction score
178
Location
Saskatoon, SK., Canada
OSB is commonly laid to the edges of the platform/floor here with the walls on top all the way up including multi-storey houses. But things are done very much differently here. (hammer) ;)

Pete
 
Top