Quantcast

Who are your favourite woodworking Writers or Makers?

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

A

Anonymous

Guest
Hi all

I was reading a woodworking book the other day and got to wondering who's work and/or writing style forum members like to read or have learnt the most valuable lessons from?

I thought that this might make a nice lighthearted discussion.

My personal favourite is probably Chris Becksvoort, I love his craftmanship and the beautiful shaker inspired designs he has created + his writing style is both pleasing and informative

See here for inspiration (especially that 15 drawer chest!!!)

http://www.chbecksvoort.com/cases.html

My god I want to be as good as him!!!!!!

Looking forward to hearing other member's preferences

Cheers

Tony


http://www.chbecksvoort.com/index.html
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I own quite a few woodworking books but my favourite writer is Jeremy Broun. Very good at descriptions and technique and although a few years back since he wrote it, the book Electric Woodwork - Power Tool Woodworking 1991 ISBN 0-946819-26-2 is both informative, humorous and very well written.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
OMG, I have just seen what Becksvoort is charging for his 15-drawer cabinet - US$8250! Unfortunately, America seems to be the only country where people are willing to pay prices for custom-made furniture that reflect the amount of time and effort needed to produce it

Rockerau

PS I will make a 15-drawer cabinet for US$5000 plus freight :D
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
rockerau


I change my statment to I wish I was as good as him and you!!

Very impressive work. Is it cherry?

Cheers

Tony
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
HI all

I chnaged the title of this thread as the original might not sit too nicely with some people after the recent 'heated' discussions.

Now let's here about your favourites and where your inspiration comes from.

Cheers

Tony
 

Chris Knight

Established Member
Joined
14 Jan 2004
Messages
6,641
Reaction score
1
Location
SE London - NW Kent
Don't think I have real favourites but I have benefited a lot from many writers, notably:-
Jewitt and Flexner on finishing, Bill Hylton on the router, Lonnie Bird on shaping wood, Nick Engler on lots of things, George Ellis on joinery as it was, Odate on Japanese tools, Joyce on Furniture, Frid for lots of things.
 

Newbie_Neil

Established Member
Joined
27 Jul 2003
Messages
6,537
Reaction score
0
Location
Nottingham, England
Like Chris I enjoy Bill Hylton on the router and one that I have enjoyed on FWW and I recently bought her book is Aimé Ontario Fraser.

It is called Getting Started in Woodworking and I would recommend it highly for anyone new to woodworking.

Cheers
Neil
 

Alf

Established Member
Joined
22 Oct 2003
Messages
12,079
Reaction score
0
Location
Up the proverbial creek
Tricky. I always get something from all of them, but I suppose John Brown for entertainment and the flood of letters that his column always used to provoke would be one. Also Charles Hayward for his definitive guides to how to do various joints etc and his thought-provoking "Chips from the Chisel" editorials. On a more up to date front, I reckon David Charlesworth for making me think about the detail involved in stuff, even if I don't always agree with just how detailed he's willing to get. :wink:

Cheers, Alf
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Tony,
Yes, my copy of Becksvoort's 15-drawer cabinet is made of cherry, which costs at least twice as much here in Oz as it does in America. But is it such a beautiful timber, that it is worth paying for, if you are aiming to make a piece of Shaker style furniture.

Chris,
Your list of authors points to a pretty comprehensive Woodwork library, and shows up the gaps in mine. I have built Lonnie Bird's colonial corner cupboard. But the piece I would love to make is Randall O'Donnell's cherry highboy. But I have never owned a house that could accommodate its majestic proportions.

Rockerau
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Come on you lot!!

This is an inspired thread (modest to the last) and deserves your time and attention.

I for one am interested in hearing who's work inspires/interests you

Cheers

Tony
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Tony,

I hesitate to mention Norm's name in these august circles, but I have made a number of the pieces featured in his two books 'Mostly Shaker' and 'Classics from the New Yankee Workshop'. Then there is Jeff Miller's book 'Chair-making and design'. Pat Warner and Sandor Nagyszalanczy have got me thinking about jigs and fixtures. Sam Maloof's classic rockers are an inspiration, but I feel that as a writer, he is a bit reticent about giving full details of how he makes his chairs.

Rockerau
 

kityuser

Established Member
Joined
12 Jan 2003
Messages
1,108
Reaction score
0
not wanting to be laughed at too much :shock: I`d have to admit to being completely inspired by norm, and yes I have both of his books (very good they are as well)
 

Midnight

Established Member
Joined
11 Oct 2003
Messages
1,805
Reaction score
0
Location
Scotland
For initial education and getting me up offa my butt and building something.. credit goes to Norm...

For opening my eyes as to what's possible with hand tools and patience, Charlesworth and Kernov... Kernov's writing reminds me of my grandfather... there's a depth of wisdom behind his words; DC is somewhat more technical, but manages to explain clearly without belittling the reader. Frid struck me as arrogant... maybe it's just me...

For inspirational work.... and words... Konrad Sauer takes some beating.....
 

Pete W

Established Member
Joined
31 Jan 2004
Messages
911
Reaction score
0
Location
London UK
My first nudge in this direction came from Andrew Crawford and Peter Lloyd, British boxmakers extraordinaire! Since I'm still in workshop setup mode and haven't managed to make anything other than a shooting board so far, I browse their wonderful books on boxes almost daily to remind myself why I'm doing this.

Have also been much inspired by Krenov's books, but largely prefer the younger generation of writers - Andy Rae (love that handtools book) and Jim Tolpin, especially. Just my opinion, but I like the Americans - they seem more ready to enthuse and romanticise about wood. Too much businesslike stiffupperlippiness from the British writers.
 

Latest posts

Top