• We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Which Table Saw?

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

A

Anonymous

Guest
Dear All.

After my darling wife (grovel grovel) treated me to a DeWalt mitre saw for christmas, I am now on the look out for a table saw but not at DeWalt prices!
As it is for light hobby use only I am considering a Ryobi ETS1525 which retails at £99.82 found at www.itslondon.co.uk
Has anyone heard of this make or have any comments or alternative suggestions at around about the 100 quid mark?

Thanks for your help.

Jason. :shock:
 

frank

Established Member
Joined
10 Sep 2003
Messages
938
Reaction score
0
Location
cheshire
if you get it jason tune it ,ie make sure the blade is in line with the table it will tell you how in the instructions at that price it could be a bargain ,i have a clark and it does its job for me .


happy sawdust making

frank
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Thanks for your advice Frank and Tony.

Regards

Jason.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Tony.

I meant to ak, is the only advantage with an induction motor the noise level output or does it have other advantages?
The reason I ask is on the website you gave, I noticed that they have a cheaper saw with legstand and table extension at a cheaper price.

Regards

Jason
 

DaveL

Established Member
Joined
19 Oct 2002
Messages
4,674
Reaction score
0
Location
Sudbury, Suffolk
Jason,

I have used a saw with an induction motor in the past, I now own one with a brush or universal motor. The noise is only one thing to consider. The brushes wear out, one reason why most of the professional saws have induction motors. The brushes also can on some designs get clogged with saw dust, not good as it is a fire risk or could stop the motor from running.
Induction motors usually run smoother, so there is less vibration of the saw, this improves how accurate the saw is and I think, makes it safer.

The down side is that induction motors cost more and normally are bigger physically. This means the trick of mounting the motor directly on or under the arbour cannot be used, often a belt is used the drive the arbour, not a problem but it adds to the cost.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
DaveL":grnba0fo said:
Jason,

The brushes also can on some designs get clogged with saw dust, not good as it is a fire risk or could stop the motor from running.
Induction motors usually run smoother, so there is less vibration of the saw, this improves how accurate the saw is and I think, makes it safer.

The down side is that induction motors cost more and normally are bigger physically. This means the trick of mounting the motor directly on or under the arbour cannot be used, often a belt is used the drive the arbour, not a problem but it adds to the cost.
Hi again

Funnily enough I know a lot more about electricity and motors than woodworking!!!
On the whole I agree with DaveL's comments although I would say that that it is not likely that the brushes will become glogged as motors tend to be well sealed these days with 'o' rings on brush covers and sealed bearings.
Issues are brush wear and NOISE and vibration. Lots of noise. Brushed motors require maintenance and have a physical connection between armature (spins) and field (stationary) which results in wear and the noise.

Induction motors use the phenonenmon of electromagnetic induction (rotor and stator not electrically connected through brushes) to work which results in less power for a given phyical size but they are much quieter (no ear plugs required and no neighbours annoyed), less vibration and they will run forever - or until bearings collapse. No maintenance really required but I would make sure that the dust is not building up on motor as this will cause it to heat up.
Induction motors tend to drive arbour by belt on larger machine such as the kity I now use. However, the saw I mentioned in previous post has blade on motor shaft in the same way as brush motor design. Belt drive reduces vibration and thus noise even furtter and thus is desirable.

Less vibration = better cut quality

Hope this helps
 

frank

Established Member
Joined
10 Sep 2003
Messages
938
Reaction score
0
Location
cheshire
tony now you have got me interested in this saw mine is noisy and it vibrates ,does anyone on the group own one of these saws and can give the lowdown on them .

ps ican still cut wood on my saw but it is noisy

pps jason you might be better going for the induction motor


thanks frank
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Hi Frank

I used one for about a year. Mine was sold by Record but it is just an eastern import badged up as their 'select' range.

Loads of places sell 'em now and Charnwood definitely have them in stock for £149 I think.

I really liked mine except for the mitre slot which was really sloppy on the very first saws (mine was one of the first made). Later saws are much better but the mitre is not in the class of my Kity but then £££ssss

The fence is not too bad as it locks at both front and back. The riving knife/blade guard come with a small dust collection hose that connects to the main rear port. Early saws didn't have these extra hoses but a friendly dealer gave me one from a later model and it was great.

I had no probs with saw and it is very quiet indeed- happy to use it without ear defenders.

One differenc between cheap induction saws and brushed motor saws is the depth of cut. Induction has less power for a given physical size of motor and so the depth of cut was only around 50-55mm rather then 70ish on brushed motor. More than made up for by lack of noise.
It also came with a small piece of fence material that bolts to main fence for use with mitre cuts to prevent kick back.

Comes with two side extension tables that have dowles for location and a strong steel stand.

Hope this helps
 
Top