• We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Which lathe best budget buy?

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

A

Anonymous

Guest
I am presently doing woodturning night classes and think I've caught the bug! Can anyone recommend a lathe about £2-250?
Cheers
Keith :?
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Hi Keith,

Before bending my great mind (Hah!) to your query, does that budget include everything? I ask because, as a rule, you seem to end up spending as much again on tools/accessories as you did on the lathe. I certainly did, and I only bought the basics; no combination chuck or stuff like that. Just something to bear in mind.

Cheers, Jester
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Hi Jester

I was thinking in terms of about £200 for the lathe and then buying the chisels, but leaving a chuck until my piggy bank was replenished. Axminster are currently offering the Perform CCL Lathe with a free set of chisels (worth about £60) thrown in! Is this lathe worth buying or should I go for something like the Record DML36SH??
What do you think? :?

Cheers

Keith
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Keith,

It's not a bad offer, is it? I have the Delta one that looks just like it, but I don't know what the differences are. Probably none, except I ended up paying more :cry: I'm very happy with mine. Good capacity and I like the variable speed. It's had good reviews too. I avoided the Record ones as I was advised that the solid cast beds would be better for lessening the vibration. Also, I didn't like the idea of having to change speed using the belt; the lever is much easier.

Just as a guide, here's what I ended up buying within a month of getting the lathe:
Woodturning; a foundation course by Keith Rowley
Axminster Cone friction drive (Good for the beginner 'cos when you "catch" it allows the workpiece to stop rather than flinging the tool across the workshop like a pronged centre does. You're probably a better turner than I, and won't need it :wink: )
Drill chuck (essential IMO. Good for holding workpieces too)
Peter Child Screw chuck (excellent. Well worth the money)
Friction Polish (I use Speed'n'Eeze and it lasts for ages)
Sanding sealer
Sanding disk system (I forget which one)
Liberon Woodturner's Stick

Subsequently I've only added a couple of tools to that. A fancy chuck would be nice, but I don't turn enough to justify it. I think the book and the drill chuck are my two "must haves". You'll also want a full face visor and a dust mask. Gosh, it all adds up doesn't it? :roll: If you really get the bug, you'll probably end up spending a fortune :wink:

Hope this is of help.

Cheers, Jester
Jester's Court
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Jester,

Thanks for the info. I think you're right, I will probably end up spending a small fortune :( , but, essentially, I don't mind if I get my money's worth.
Like everyone starting a new hobby, there is always a seed of doubt that the enthusiasm will wane. We'll see.

BTW - this site, and the forum is a great idea, I hope it continues to grow.

Cheers

Keith
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Keith,

There's a review of the Perform tool set in the current (December) issue of Good Woodworking. They got the best value vote. The only real quibble seems to be that they are not well ground to start with.

Which reminds me of another thing that you might need to consider. A grinder and jig (particularly for the fingernail grind on the gouges). If you can do 'em freehand, good for you. I can't, but I've found the Sorby jig to be very effective FWIW.

Cheers, Jester
 
Top