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What to do with a split?

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caveman

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Hoping to make a small table from an Oak slice. It has now dried but has also, as expected, split.

What can I do with this split, to hide it or incorporate it into the table please?

fallout 3 morality
 

Mike Jordan

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As you say the split was certain to occur, and even when the slice is down to its final moisture content it will continue to open and close slightly with variations in ambient moisture levels. You can't stop it moving so anything used to fill the gap would need to be flexible. I suggest completing the table and leaving the split as a feature.
 

Rob_Mc

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How about a couple of butterfly wedges bridging across the split in a contrasting wood? This would both stabilise the split and add aesthetic value.
 

Zeddedhed

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Clean up the split to a nice cake slice shape and then make a leg with a corresponding wedge shaped tenon to fit in. The other legs could do the same or be fitted some other way.
 

Mike Jordan

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Please be assured that any attempt to secure the split will cause further damage.
 

caveman

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Hey guys, brilliant! Love the idea of incorporating it into the finished item as a feature, saves a lot of wasted effort as well!
I'll get it planed down thickness wise and then decide. The wedge/leg idea is a real possibility!
I'll let you know what happens!
 

Sheffield Tony

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You aren't going to like this, but this is doomed to failure. Wood moves about twice as much circumferentially as radially, hence the split. That's why you don't see tables with end grain tops often, if at all. I would save the split :wink: , use the surrounding wood for winter fuel, and make a properly engineered top.
 
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