Wadkin Lathe RS - Banjo Attachment... Dismantling

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JohnerH

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Top of the morning,

I'm currently trying to dismantle this thing which pertains to a tool rest for the RS,

DSC_5377.JPG


However, I'm having issues on 2 fronts which I'd like to reach out for ideas and/or help.

And yes, I do need to dismantle it due to this (hair line crack) and wanting to paint it,



hair line crack.JPG


So, 2 questions,

Firstly, how on earth to I get this pin out? Believe me, I've been pounding it and it just won't budge.

pin.JPG


Secondly, once I get this pin out,

Then, are these pressure fit? and if so, any ideas on the plan?

ring.JPG


Any help/ideas most welcome, me and the banjo had words yesterday and it won't... barely...

Last thing I want is to permanently damage it.

Thanking you
 
I can't see from your first photo, just where that pin is. But to take it apart you need to remove the pin just visible to the right in the second picture.

The pin is a tapered pin, so it only comes out one way. You need to establish which end is the smaller diameter and punch it out from that end (if it's mushroomed then file down the mushroom to just clear of the collar). You should then be able to slide the collar off - it's a loose-ish press fit.
Then, if I remember correctly the whole shaft slides out the other direction (towards the handle). I'll go check on mine in the morning to confirm (it's 10:30pm here and I'm going to bed as soon as I've checked the Joke thread).

Cheers, Vann.
 
I can't see from your first photo, just where that pin is. But to take it apart you need to remove the pin just visible to the right in the second picture.

The pin is a tapered pin, so it only comes out one way. You need to establish which end is the smaller diameter and punch it out from that end (if it's mushroomed then file down the mushroom to just clear of the collar). You should then be able to slide the collar off - it's a loose-ish press fit.
Then, if I remember correctly the whole shaft slides out the other direction (towards the handle). I'll go check on mine in the morning to confirm (it's 10:30pm here and I'm going to bed as soon as I've checked the Joke thread).

Cheers, Vann.
Cheers Van,

Appreciate the help,

J
 
Top of the morning,

I'm currently trying to dismantle this thing which pertains to a tool rest for the RS,

View attachment 179644

However, I'm having issues on 2 fronts which I'd like to reach out for ideas and/or help.

And yes, I do need to dismantle it due to this (hair line crack) and wanting to paint it,



View attachment 179645

So, 2 questions,

Firstly, how on earth to I get this pin out? Believe me, I've been pounding it and it just won't budge.

View attachment 179646

Secondly, once I get this pin out,

Then, are these pressure fit? and if so, any ideas on the plan?

View attachment 179647

Any help/ideas most welcome, me and the banjo had words yesterday and it won't... barely...

Last thing I want is to permanently damage it.

Thanking you
How to Dismantle a RS tool rest holder.
First you have to knock out two taper pins, hitting the small end with a punch. One in the handle and one in the collar at the opposite end. With the handle and collar removed you will see a bush at the back end, held in place by a screw threaded into the joint line. Remove the screw and hit the front of the shaft. The shaft needs to be protected in order to do this. In turn this will enable the bush to come out and now every thing can be dismantled. When I made new
tool rest holders, I held this bush in place by using a hexagon socket grub screw which was much easier. Regards Stan
PS I would clean up the shaft first so that every thing will slide along it easy.
 
How to Dismantle a RS tool rest holder.
First you have to knock out two taper pins, hitting the small end with a punch. One in the handle and one in the collar at the opposite end. With the handle and collar removed you will see a bush at the back end, held in place by a screw threaded into the joint line. Remove the screw and hit the front of the shaft. The shaft needs to be protected in order to do this. In turn this will enable the bush to come out and now every thing can be dismantled. When I made new
tool rest holders, I held this bush in place by using a hexagon socket grub screw which was much easier. Regards Stan
PS I would clean up the shaft first so that every thing will slide along it easy.
Thanking you sir, I'll post another thread with the dismantling progress...

Really appreciate the guidance.
 
How to Dismantle a RS tool rest holder.
First you have to knock out two taper pins, hitting the small end with a punch. One in the handle and one in the collar at the opposite end.
No dice, there's one pin that simply just doesn't want to come out.

Here he is...

Bar End Taper 2.JPG


Bar End Taper.JPG



Any tips, or just keep at it?
 
If it is a taper pin then sometimes they really don't want to know. Then you have a choice. Can you leave it alone and still do what you need to? If it absolutely has to come out then you may have to drill it out. Use a drill no bigger than the small end, then a fine tapered reamer. A right PITA I'm afraid.
 
If it is a taper pin then sometimes they really don't want to know. Then you have a choice. Can you leave it alone and still do what you need to?
Not really, the bajo has a hairline fracture I'd like to address and fix.


If it absolutely has to come out then you may have to drill it out. Use a drill no bigger than the small end, then a fine tapered reamer. A right PITA I'm afraid.
The last resort is taking it into the factory, the Eng. team have a hydraulic press which they can use to convince the pin to come out... not he prettiest, not what I wanted to do but... it'll get the job done.

Given how many pins I'll probably have to address I'm also hunting eBay for a vintage 2/2.5lb hammer...

Let's see what happens.
 
Not really, the bajo has a hairline fracture I'd like to address and fix.



The last resort is taking it into the factory, the Eng. team have a hydraulic press which they can use to convince the pin to come out... not he prettiest, not what I wanted to do but... it'll get the job done.

Given how many pins I'll probably have to address I'm also hunting eBay for a vintage 2/2.5lb hammer...

Let's see what happens.
You want some support under the handle to make it solid when hitting the small end of the taper pin and also a decent size hammer which you hav'ent got if you are lookng for a 2lb hammer. Wadin used these a lot on their older machines, a sign of good engineering. in the past i have never had a problem removing these but you do have to have the handle on something solid when hitting the small end of the pin. hope this helps and you succeed with it's removal regards Stan
 
I was going to say exactly the same. Bit of bar with a suitably sized hole in the end for the pin to be driven into works well. I have had some fun with these on old lathes. Sometimes even with a press they just won't let go. All good fun.
 
Gentleman, thank you... I didn't consider that.

I'll give it a try today (with a normal hammer) and if it fails I'll take the banjo to the factory tomorrow.

I'll report back.

N.b.: I have a vintage 2lb hammer on order from eBay.

Have a great Sunday all.
 
Last edited:
No dice, there's one pin that simply just doesn't want to come out.

Here he is...

View attachment 179813
I can only suggest the banjo handle may have been pulled so tight that it's moved slightly on the shaft and formed a step in the pin. As the handle can be tightened both clockwise and anti-clockwise, it's impossible to know which way the step might be.

I suggest you just keep at it - making sure it IS the smaller end you are walloping... If the smaller end is already squashed it may be difficult to distinguish from the larger end.

...you will see a bush at the back end, held in place by a screw threaded into the joint line...
If my memory serves me correctly, some bushes are held that way, but others are done differently (again it's too late to go out to the workshop to look).

Cheers, Vann.
 
"For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction" I use a piece of RSJ as a support for anything that needs impulse knockometer intervention.
 
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