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Veneering

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deserter

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I have to veneer a small table top at home soon, at work I would use a two part resin glue and heated press and have the job done in under 20 mins. However at home I have no press or vacuum press, so I'm forced to work differently, I'm torn between methods so I wondered what others use, the 2 which are currently battling in my head are either contact adhesive or some of that heat activated glue film stuff sold at veneer suppliers.
 

Paul Chapman

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deserter":2h8a2ezj said:
contact adhesive or some of that heat activated glue film stuff sold at veneer suppliers.
I wouldn't use contact adhesive. In my experience it eventually dries out completely and the veneer will lift. It might take a few years but eventually it will fail. Glue film would be better but the best would be Scotch glue.

Cheers :wink:

Paul
 

Cheshirechappie

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I'm not sure that I'm in any position to offer advice on veneering; the only such I've ever done was a small box, using PVA and flat cauls with every clamp I could find. Worked fine, and lasted; not sure it would work well on a larger surface.

You can get Liquid Hide Glue, which I gather can be thinned by standing the pot in a bowl of hot water. That might make the traditional 'hot scotch glue' method a bit easier in the home workshop.
 

Woodwould

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xy mosian":36wkf29p said:
Had you thought about Scotch glue veneering? Have a look at this guy, a very down to earth method. I have used it and found it to be very successful.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=inyVp5r7 ... ature=plcp

xy
The chap in the video makes it look very simple. It's even simpler than it looks! It's a very forgiving process and virtually impossible to screw up.
 

deserter

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I'll second that, I started using the hot melt glue film, which was pretty much useless. Then after watching that video, I redid it all using scotch glue which has done a perfect job.
 

Teckel

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Oh I love pot glue. It was the only glue allowed in our workshop when we were at restoration.
If your a novice with this glue,you could heat up your workpiece to be venered with a heatgun or iron to give you a little bit of extra time to get your bearings..and work as quick as you can.
Very easy glue to use. I love the smell of it...!!

Teckel
 

Steve Maskery

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I realise you have the solution now, but just a note for future readers of this thread:
You can get excellent results on flat panels with compliant veneers, using one of those vacuum bags for clothes storage. You won't get the same vac pull as with a pump, which is why I say use it for forgiving projects rather than bumpy burrs on a curved caul, but it really does do a good job.
S
 
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