Tounge and Groove

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MattLee1. 0

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Hi all,

I am looking to build a shed and I am thinking of making the walls out of 50mm x 125mm stacked with a tounge and groove to lock it in place. I've looked at dado heads but for obvious reasons this is going to prove difficult to get the parts. Would a router table work or does anyone have any suggestions of how this can be achieved? I'm not sure how to attached a picture for ease of reference
 

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In my opinion, if the T+G is just straight forward and square-shouldered I would seriously consider one of these cutterheads: https://www.scosarg.com/cmt-694-021-adjustable-groover-d-150-b-14-28-d-30
You can set the two plates to cut your 25mm groove in all your boards, and then when that's completed you can invert the plates so they cut your tongues perfectly. Far better cut, more accurate and cheaper than dado stacks which are really pants compared to these.

Of course, you will need either a table saw with a longish arbour to accept the cutterhead (Which you would need for a dado stack anyway!) or a spindle moulder. I wouldn't even consider machining such a large section and length on a router table, or any tool that isn't man enough for it really. The ideal set-up would be a spindle moulder with power-feed.
 
I suggest you have further think! That's a very expensive and labour intensive system with a very short life expectancy. Those horizontal joints will hold water and cause rot to set in very rapidly, not to mention the problems of expansion.
 
I agree with previous re susceptibility to rot, and surely 50mm is unnecessarily thick and therefore unnecessarily expensive.
 
Like as said, thats not a very good way to build a shed at all.
too much wood, too much work, Not enough water proofing.
Look for shiplap planks, nailed or screwed to a timber frame.
 
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