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Table saw stopped

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GrahamIreland

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I got the evolution rage table saw. Decent enough with a good blade. However when ripping a board it got jammed and stopped,
Can't seem to get it going again, changed fuse but nothing.
Warranty will cover it, but am curious why it won't get going again, is there some kind of kill switch in it?

Graham
 

lurker

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Is there a cut out in there somewhere.
They are common in these tools

Some have a separate reset button on the bodywork.
Maybe one on the motor itself
Unplug before you start hunting for it
 

sunnybob

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Usually, its a small red button but sometimes its black. Search the motor especially well. If you find it, it might be a hard press to reset. There are mechanical (hard to push) and electric (easy press) types.
 

DavidRa

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Hopefully you didn't send this back under warranty because if the blade has been changed it invalidates the warranty , as I have just found to my annoyance today, especially as I put a good blade in it
 

DavidRa

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I know , never even crossed my mind that might be the case. I couldn't change it back ,of course, as it was the blade lifting mechanism that broke! I wasn't going to keep it even if it had been fixed as it is not a great table saw and my needs have moved on but it smacks of a petty mindset
evo warranty.jpg
 

Fergie 307

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I know no one is going to bother, but I would love to see them try and defend that position in court. They can't bypass things like the sale of goods act, no matter what they say in their warranty. If the blade you had fitted was the wrong size or you had fitted it incorrectly, fair enough. But if you have replaced it properly with one of the correct spec, then this is nonsense. Of course you have to bear in mind that a warranty a a purely voluntary undertaking by the manufacturer, so they can refuse to repair it under the warranty for any reason they like. Interestingly you could argue that the warranty forms part of your contract with the seller. If this is the case then this could be seen as an unfair or unreasonable term in the contract. This was what the banks fell foul of over bank charges. Legislation says that it should be of merchantable quality, and last a reasonable time. If you formally rejected it on that basis, and demanded your money back, then in order to wriggle out of it they would essentially have to prove that your "modification" had caused the failure, or that your use of the machine was somehow unreasonable. What they count on of course is that when they point this bit of the warranty out 99.9% of customers are going to say oh bother I hadn't realised that, and that will be the end of it. There is an interesting comparison to be made with the motor industry. For years the only way any manufacturer would honour a warranty was if you had the car serviced at their dealerships, using their parts. It was the EU I believe that decided this was unreasonable, and ended it. So now you can have the car serviced by someone else, and using pattern parts, and that does not in and of itself invalidate the warranty. It is very depressing that in this day and age there are still so many companies whose default position is to deny a claim, and just stonewall the customer in the hope they will go away. Banks and insurance companies are masters of it.
 

TRITON

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Well theres a tip for everyone thinking of buying this make. Either dont, or make a couple of cuts on that blade then remove it and fit a better one, which is likely to be better as a cheap saw isnt going to stock a top end blade on it to keep their profit margins high.
If it breaks, refit the original blade.
Of course you have to bear in mind that a warranty a a purely voluntary undertaking by the manufacturer
Everything under law has a minimum of 12 months guarantee on it, but it goes a bit further than that as the law recognizes the fact some items are meant to last longer than a year of use and it has been successfully argued that the guarantee can extend beyond that initial term.
" statutory rights under the Consumer Rights Act 2015 (CRA 2015). "
 
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DavidRa

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Tbh it’s my own fault , I didn’t listen to my own advice of buy cheap buy twice. Anyway lesson learnt, time for an upgrade and who doesn’t like an upgrade 😂
 

Fergie 307

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Well theres a tip for everyone thinking of buying this make. Either dont, or make a couple of cuts on that blade then remove it and fit a better one, which is likely to be better as a cheap saw isnt going to stock a top end blade on it to keep their profit margins high.
If it breaks, refit the original blade.

Everything under law has a minimum of 12 months guarantee on it, but it goes a bit further than that as the law recognizes the fact some items are meant to last longer than a year of use and it has been successfully argued that the guarantee can extend beyond that initial term.
" statutory rights under the Consumer Rights Act 2015 (CRA 2015). "
Your statutory rights have nothing to do with any warranty or guarantee offered by the manufacturer, indeed these documents usually carry a rider which says " This does not affect your statutory rights". Where people often go wrong is that your statutory rights are to do with the seller of the item, not necessarily the manufacturer. So if I buy a Bosch drill from B&Q and it blows up after a week my statutory rights would be to claim redress against B&Q, not Bosch. Often the shop staff don't know this, and will tell you it's nothing to do with them, and to take it up with the manufacturer. Wrong, they sold it to you, they are responsible under consumer law. Of course you may choose to make a claim under the warranty or guarantee, with the manufacturer, but that is quite different. And I don't think you will find that any UK consumer law gives a set period. It is dependent on what the expectation of a reasonable person would be in relation to the goods in question. So you will have a different expectation of the durability of a cheap pair of shoes versus say a washing machine.
 

artie

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I wouldn't give up so easily.
Couple of years ago I bought an all singing all dancing 4 head razor for a hundred odd quid which failed quite quickly.

When I phoned the company the call was redirected to America, I was happy cause their customer service is usually way above UK.

Not in this instance.
They said I could send it back but this, that and the other wasn't covered under warranty.
Long story short after quite a bit of banter and quoting of sale of good act etc and going up two levels of management, they agreed to send me a new one as a good will gesture.

I put it on a well known online auction site and vowed never to deal with them again.
 

Fergie 307

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If the item is fairly new and has failed then you can reject it and ask for your money back. If you go on the Which magazine site they have various template letters and so forth you can download or copy to help you with this. It is fairly straightforward. I have done this myself, and helped other people with similar issues. Once they realise you know your rights and are not going to be fobbed off they usually sort it out. It does often involve some hassle and numerous letters, which it really shouldn't do. It's a shame other companies don't take the same approach as Screwfix for example, who in my experience will exchange or refund faulty items without any drama.
 
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