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Starter set of chisels??

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Mark Hancock

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Andy

I would suggest you don't. Faithful aren't a company known for turning tools to start with and the set composition is not very good IMHO. From the left there appear to be 2 Continental Gouges, a shallow fluted/spindle gouge, 2 skew chisels, a V scraper, a parting tool and a round nose scraper. There is no Spindle Roughing Gouge, though a Continental could be used for this.
A good started set would be:
3/4" 19mm Spindle Roughing Gouge
3/8" 10mm Spindle Gouge
1/8" 3mm Parting Tool
3/4" 19mm Oval Skew Chisel
You could get these 4 tools from a recognised manufacturer for a similar price (Hamlet about £83) and have a quality set, better designed that will last you. Note that the set does not include bowl gouges for cross grain turning.
 

nev

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Hi, there is a good guide to which tools and why here ...
http://www.peterchild.co.uk/info1/firsttools.htm
and to show I'm not biased here too...
http://www.woodworking.co.uk/Technical/ ... nners.html
http://www.toolpost.co.uk/pages/Turning ... _sets.html

personally I have the Record Power and Robert Sorby 'starter' sets and i favour some tools from one and some from the other, the sorby ones possibly hold their edge a little longer. I did treat myself to a HT superflute last year and that was a revelation compared to my starter sets, far superior! much more rigid and instils a lot more confidence.
Makes to consider - Robert Sorby, Record power, Henry Taylor, Hamlet, Ashley Iles...
As with most tool choices, the more you spend the better it gets -- to a point!
If your budget is fixed and you need to choose between 6 average tools or four quality ones, I'd go for the four. theres always next payday!
 

Mark Hancock

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andersonec":3sbzn1ka said:
Mark, thanks for that, any idea where I could get them? tried searching on here but keep going round in circles, pun intended!!

What about these? http://www.axminster.co.uk/axminster-ax ... rod822073/

Andy
It's a better set from the content point of view but again I don't think they are of the quality of recognised turning tools manufacturers - the big "HSS" stamped on them is the give away. This is just a cheap set put together for Axminster. If you compare these with Axminster's own tools you can spot the difference - Axminster's own are I believe made by Henry Taylor/Hamlet (one and the same company). Another issue is that where a set contains a Bowl Gouge it is supplied with a shortened handle simply so it fits into the box! Consequently it makes the tool harder to use. If memory serves me right the only set I've come across where this wasn't as obvious was a Sorby set.
I personally recommend to my students that they avoid sets and buy the tools individually. This way they get decent tools with the appropriate size handle for their situation and avoid the 'odd ball' tool that so often seems to be thrown in a set to make up the numbers.
IMHO the makes to consider are Henry Taylor, Hamlet, Crown, Sorby and Ashley Isles. I have a number of Record tools but am not a big fan of them. Also I'm not a big user of scrapers and don't usually recommend them to my students; there are other simpler and cheapers ways of achieving the same results.
 

Mark Hancock

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andersonec":2u3bxn51 said:
Mark, thanks for that, any idea where I could get them? tried searching on here but keep going round in circles, pun intended!!

Andy
Try Classic Hand Tools http://www.classichandtools.com/ They stock Sorby and Hamlet, have a price match promise, you'll get free shipping on orders over £45 and they're a good company to deal with.
 

andersonec

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I really appreciate all your input chaps, after reading and digesting your info. I did a lot of searching and tried some of your links then wound up here http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Robert-Sorby- ... 3232wt_932
So that is a set of six for a hundred squid, ordered them before I told 'er indoors, now all I've got to do is learn how to use them.

Thanks again.
Andy
 

drillbit

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Hi Andy

You did well there. Those will be nice tools. You better learn to grind them properly quick - you dont want to be grinding sorby chisels down to the handle while you learn to get the perfect fingernail grind- come to think of it, maybe I'm the only person who took that long..
 

Phil Pascoe

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It serves no purpose whatsoever to have identical handles, in fact the exact opposite is an advantage- if you can buy anything unhandled, make your own (or if you buy anything second hand, disregard the handles) You will find some designs of handle don't suit your hands- you want them fatter, thinner, longer, shorter, oval, whatever------make your own! you're supposed to be a turner.
 

Paul.J

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andersonec":345i27tc said:
Cheers Paul, just had a look at your doings :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: =D>

Andy
Why thank you Andy :wink:
I found the Sorby handles really nice and comfy to hold,and i have used em quite a bit since i bought em.
In fact i have quite a variety of different shaped handles and none of em concern me as to what shape they are,so long as they do the job.
When you get some experience under your belt you can then start to think about designing your own handles if you feel you need to,but they have never bothered me.
 

andersonec

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I would guess like anything else, it's what you get used to, I am just starting out and if I start with one type then a year later change then I expect I would find a difference and would have to adjust, same with any other tool really, hand plane, saw or even ordinary chisels. I have had a go on a friends lathe and for a first time I was concentrating on the cutting and the handles never came into the equation, no doubt I will learn differently.
The problem with making my own at the minute is that I don't know the first thing about which handle suits which individual tool and I haven't got the experience or the tools to make them with, I will just have to trust in the the manufacturers experience for the time being.

Andy
 

John. B

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Well Andy,

Firstly welcome to the slippery slope of Woodturning, you have crossed the first hurdle, (tools)

the second hurdle, 'How to sharpen them'. the best advice I can give you is to get some tuition.

The best place, other than getting personal tuition from a professional turner is to join a club, certainly cheaper.

Your profile doesn't say where in Lincolnshire you are from, so you need to Google,

Woodturning clubs in Lincolnshire or where you actually live. There are a few in Lincolnshire so hopefully

there is one near you. There you'll get advice on turning, equipment, sharpening, and hopefully practice.

John. B
 

Spindle

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Hi

I've been using Sorbey tools since I started turning about 10 years ago - they are not the cheapest but over the period I have never had an issue with them, I think you will be pleased with your purchase.

Regards Mick
 

Aled Dafis

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Same here, I started out with the Sorby set, and about eight years later I still use some of them virtually every time I'm on the lathe. Yes I now have a few more tools, but you can turn a hell of a lot of things with that starter set, and quality wise Sorby are very hard to beat!

I tried freehand sharpening at the start but just got increasingly frustrated, you'd be wise either to invest some time making your own sharpening jig or some money in buying one. I now have the Sorby Proedge, but can see that it's a lot of money to shell out as a beginner, I managed fine with one I made for years. (The sorby is fantastic though!)

Cheers
Aled
 

andersonec

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John,
There's a large club not 15 minutes from me http://www.lincsturners.co.uk/ and I propose to go to their next meeting. Sharpening I think I can hack, I do all my planes and chisels by hand and can shave with them, realize turning chisels are a different kettle of fish but I will sort something out.

Andy
 

yetloh

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If I may, I would like to muscle in on this thread with a slightly different question.

I am an experienced furniture maker but have done only a very small amount of turning and don't have a lathe of my own. I am now booked onto a wind instrument making course at West Dean in the summer, to make a wooden recorder or small flute. My experience has taught me that if you buy cheap tools you always end up buying twice, the second time being the time you buy the tool you should have bought in the first place. West Dean have their own tools but I would rather have my own. However, I don't really want to shell out for new top quality turning tools so am thinking of buying secondhand as there are a couple of good s/hand tool shops in my area. I would be grateful for any tips as to makes and models worth looking out for that would fit in with my "buy once" philosophy.

Jim
 
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