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Scheppach 16amp plug

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Trevanion

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That's a Shucko socket which are pretty common on Scheppach gear, the male plug is on the machine and the female socket is usually on the cable with a 13A British plug on the other end.

You'll be able to find how to wire them correctly online.
 

Georgiobadgio

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The information I can find says that as long as the earth is central it doesn't matter which side the live is connected. I was just asking to see if anyone had any experience specific to this machine.
 

MikeK

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The information I can find says that as long as the earth is central it doesn't matter which side the live is connected. I was just asking to see if anyone had any experience specific to this machine.
The information is correct. It does not matter which side the line and neutral are connected since the Schuko plugs can be inserted in the receptacles either way.
 

bushwhaker

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I confirm! Earth is central. The other sides does not matter. Here we use schuko plugs.
 

clogs

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unless I'm mistaken thats just a normal Euro plug......
where's he going to buy a socket in the UK.....he's located in Cornwall.....
That's unless he uses a nasty adaptor.....they the adaptors have printed on them (not for permenant use in the UK)...

happy to learn tho.....
 

Dee J

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unless I'm mistaken thats just a normal Euro plug......
where's he going to buy a socket in the UK.....he's located in Cornwall.....
That's unless he uses a nasty adaptor.....they the adaptors have printed on them (not for permenant use in the UK)...

happy to learn tho.....
I think that's a trailing socket that fits onto the inlet position on the machine. The op can fit whatever suitable plug at the other end of the flex.
 

Georgiobadgio

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I think that's a trailing socket that fits onto the inlet position on the machine. The op can fit whatever suitable plug at the other end of the flex.
That is correct. I had a normal uk 16amp plug fitted to the other end.
 

Eric The Viking

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What you show in your first pictures is a Shuko socket, what we sometimes call a "trailing socket", which fits on a cable. The Shuko "plug" is fixed on the machine.

The information you have been given is correct: the middle pin is "earth" or "ground" and the other two can be wired either way round, because Shuko plugs can be used either way round.

If you are wiring a new cable into your Shuko trailing socket, make sure the earth wire is slightly too long, so it has a little extra inside the connector. This is for safety: then, if the cable is pulled hard, the last wire to come loose will be the earth, meaning the case of the machine stays earthed. British "13A" plugs have space inside for a loop of earth wire for the same reason, although most home and DIY users don't realise this.

From memory, Shuko plugs have a higher (16A) rating than British domestic plugs (13A). Check the power requirements of the machine: the data label on it might say how much current it takes, but should always say how much power it uses (at 240V!), allowing you to work out how much current it takes using a simple variation of Ohm's law*:

Power (W) / Voltage (V) = Current (A)

If this is close to 13A you should be fine without needing the special 16A plug that you show in your other picture.
Make sure your "13A" plug has a 13A fuse in it!

If the machine needs more current, you might need a 16A socket, using the blue plug system you show. These should be installed by an electrician (you can wire the plug yourself!).

Hope that is easy to read.

E.

*To be exact, Ohm's law does not apply to this because it is a motor, but the answer from the simple equation above should be close enough for practical purposes.
 

Georgiobadgio

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What you show in your first pictures is a Shuko socket, what we sometimes call a "trailing socket", which fits on a cable. The Shuko "plug" is fixed on the machine.

The information you have been given is correct: the middle pin is "earth" or "ground" and the other two can be wired either way round, because Shuko plugs can be used either way round.

If you are wiring a new cable into your Shuko trailing socket, make sure the earth wire is slightly too long, so it has a little extra inside the connector. This is for safety: then, if the cable is pulled hard, the last wire to come loose will be the earth, meaning the case of the machine stays earthed. British "13A" plugs have space inside for a loop of earth wire for the same reason, although most home and DIY users don't realise this.

From memory, Shuko plugs have a higher (16A) rating than British domestic plugs (13A). Check the power requirements of the machine: the data label on it might say how much current it takes, but should always say how much power it uses (at 240V!), allowing you to work out how much current it takes using a simple variation of Ohm's law*:

Power (W) / Voltage (V) = Current (A)

If this is close to 13A you should be fine without needing the special 16A plug that you show in your other picture.
Make sure your "13A" plug has a 13A fuse in it!

If the machine needs more current, you might need a 16A socket, using the blue plug system you show. These should be installed by an electrician (you can wire the plug yourself!).

Hope that is easy to read.

E.

*To be exact, Ohm's law does not apply to this because it is a motor, but the answer from the simple equation above should be close enough for practical purposes.
Thank you! Some great information there.
 

Sideways

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Schuko plugs and CE plugs are UNFUSED.
Beware of that.
You can plug a Schuko plug into a UK ring main via an unfused adapter but you won't have the level of fault protection that is intended in the UK wiring system. Schuko are designed to be used with 16A or less breakers in the fuse box.
Most of our cousins across the water don't use ring mains like us which are fused at 30 or 32 Amps and DESIGNED to be used with British Standard FUSED plugs to limit the current per appliance to 13A
Using an unfused schuko plug and an unfused adapter means you could potentially pull 32A out of a domestic wall socket without ever tripping the breaker. UK 3 pin outlets are not designed for that, nor are the Schuko plugs and adapters and all of them would overheat in that situation.
As Schuko plugs can be inserted either way round, they should be used on RCD protected circuits for safety.
CE connectors are intended for commercial / industrial applications, not general domestic use, and while they are a good, robust solution for the workshop they need to be connected to properly sized breakers and not wired into ring mains. Also rremember that it isn't clever to pull a (e.g.) 64 Amp CE plug out while it's carrying full current. That's why interlocked CE sockets are made in every size and variant. They make you turn off the power before pulling the plug out.
 

Sideways

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Not saying you are wrong, but I've never seen one. I have seen a variety of adapters though, all of which involve a 13A fuse in the bit with 13A pins on it.

P'raps I ought to get out more...
It's a good thing that most adapters these days ARE fused just as you describe them. Unfused travel type adapters are not uncommon though.
 

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