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Router jig for angled housing.

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John Brown

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I'm rebuilding an umpire's chair, and want to cut housings for the steps/treads with a router. The housings will not be at 90°, and are mirrored on the other side piece. Should I make a fully adjustable jig, or would I be better off making a right angled one, and using a wedge or packing piece to achieve the desired angle?
 

John Brown

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Thanks. I'd considered that, but I don't think it works for the jig construction I had in mind, as the batten on top would get in the way of the router base.
 

Steve Maskery

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What design jig are you using?
You could make a flat board, two pieces of MDF with glued with two spacers between the edged, to make a board with a long rectangular hole down the middle, wide enough to take a guide bush.
Then drill a couple of holes on a line equal to your slope, so that a dowel is snug.
That way you can clamp the jig either way up and there is no batten to get in the way. Just make sure that it is big enough for you to keep the clamps out of the way.
 

John Brown

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Thanks. That might work. I was planning on making the slot slightly adjustable, as I was planning on keeping two of the treads, which are fine, and I expect a minor thickness difference, but I expect I can get round that.
 

custard

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I make a few furniture designs with angled drawers, cutting the angled groove for the drawer bottom in the drawer front is a right pain. I normally use a slot cutter on a spindle moulder with an angle fence, then run the workpiece across either with a push stick if I've only got a few, or with a power feed if there are lots to be done.

I believe that at Parnham the advice given to aspiring furniture makers was that if you had curves or angles on one side of a piece of furniture then increase your price by x3, and if you have curves or angles on two sides then increase by x10. It sounds crazy but bitter experience has taught me that's about right!
 

MikeG.

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John Brown":1zi35i4z said:
Thanks. I'd considered that, but I don't think it works for the jig construction I had in mind, as the batten on top would get in the way of the router base.
Does the housing run the entire width of the string? If not, then the edge it doesn't run to is the edge you would reference the batten against. If it is edge-to-edge, then simply unscrew the batten after doing one string of housings, and screw it on the reverse side to do the other set.
 

John Brown

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custard":350uge7p said:
I make a few furniture designs with angled drawers, cutting the angled groove for the drawer bottom in the drawer front is a right pain. I normally use a slot cutter on a spindle moulder with an angle fence, then run the workpiece across either with a push stick if I've only got a few, or with a power feed if there are lots to be done.

I believe that at Parnham the advice given to aspiring furniture makers was that if you had curves or angles on one side of a piece of furniture then increase your price by x3, and if you have curves or angles on two sides then increase by x10. It sounds crazy but bitter experience has taught me that's about right!
I think that's a different sort of angle, Custard. But thanks anyway.
 

John Brown

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MikeG.":1yp64kkz said:
John Brown":1yp64kkz said:
Thanks. I'd considered that, but I don't think it works for the jig construction I had in mind, as the batten on top would get in the way of the router base.
Does the housing run the entire width of the string? If not, then the edge it doesn't run to is the edge you would reference the batten against. If it is edge-to-edge, then simply unscrew the batten after doing one string of housings, and screw it on the reverse side to do the other set.
Yes. Runs the entire width.
 

woodbloke66

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custard":2t72pgmh said:
I believe that at Parnham the advice given to aspiring furniture makers was that if you had curves or angles on one side of a piece of furniture then increase your price by x3, and if you have curves or angles on two sides then increase by x10. It sounds crazy but bitter experience has taught me that's about right!
I could have found the definitive answer for you Custard....

IMG_2713.jpg


...at AXHQ yesterday! :D - Rob
 

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