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ObservantGround28

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Can anyone help me out with some router bit advice?

I'm looking for a 1/2" radius roundover over bit for a MDF project and I don't have anything planned for further use yet.

I have a small 1/4" router and a larger more powerful router Triton MOF001 that will accommodate 1/4" and 1/2" bits.

Is a 1/4" shank bit robust enough for occasional use? And can anyone recommend reasonably priced brands/sellers?

Thanks in advance
 

Inspector

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In the olden days there were no 1/2" shank router bits and they used bigger cutters than a 1/2" round over. Making several passes (2 or 3) lowering the bit a little each pass will work just fine. If you prefer the small router and can hold it safely it will do the job nicely, especially for occasional use. The 1/2" shank bits are stronger and can be pushed hard but there are lots of jobs that can be accomplished with the 1/4" shank bits if you don't go ape on them.

Pete
 

JobandKnock

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In the olden days there were no 1/2" shank router bits and they used bigger cutters than a 1/2" round over.
You must be a lot older than me - we had a Stanley production plunge router one place I worked in the late 1970s that took 1/2in router bits and Elu/Trend had certainly been selling them in the UK for a while by then, so possibly late 1960s/early 1970s?
 

clogs

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all my 1/4 or 6mm router bits are just gathering dust.....I wont get rid just in case....likewise for the small routers....
If I cant use an 1/2 router bit and big HP router I find another way....
the big heavy stuff just feels right to me....
the small routers feel like a toy now.....scary n light....
 

Phil Pascoe

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In the olden days there were no 1/2" shank router bits and they used bigger cutters than a 1/2" round over. Making several passes (2 or 3) lowering the bit a little each pass will work just fine. If you prefer the small router and can hold it safely it will do the job nicely, especially for occasional use. The 1/2" shank bits are stronger and can be pushed hard but there are lots of jobs that can be accomplished with the 1/4" shank bits if you don't go ape on them.

Pete
When were your "olden days" Pete? I bought my 1/2" Bosch in 1989 and was probably late on the scene.
 

Droogs

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In the olden days there were no 1/2" shank router bits

Pete
@Phil Pascoe, yes you were a bit late there Phil not by much just 81 years
:p
The generally accepted earliest known for sale electric router produced by the Kelly Company, though weighing in at 60lbs apparently came with a 1/2" shank bit. This was in 1908, I don't think you can get much more "olden days" than that in routering terms. just saying :whistle:
 

Inspector

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Late 70s for me. My dad had a shop starting when I was getting around on my knees, mid 50s and had a 1/4" router they used to make Danish Modern furniture and that's all they used. He was still using it in his antique repair and refinishing until he retired in 1986. I started my hobby in the late 70s and my first was a Makita plunge router, the Japanese basically introduced the type to North America, able to do both shank sizes but I still used a fair number of 1/4' shank bits, including some HSS ones. I have 5 now of which 2 are 1/4" only. They get used where the smaller size is appropriate and the smaller weight is appreciated.

The OP asked if the 1/4" shank would work and I say it is. Not every situation needs the biggest router you can pick up in the same way router tables can be simple and not as everyone wants now with lifts (some powered), special spindle motors, digital displays on those fences and lifts, most more sophisticated than shapers. Plenty of occasions where less is more. :)

Pete

In light of Droogs historical facts I'll admit to being wrong and bow out.đź‘‹
 
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