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Robinia Pseudoacacia for furniture?

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disco_monkey79

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Hi

I have found a local source of Robinia Pseudoacacia (aka black locust or false acacia).

Is there any compelling reason why I shouldn't use this for furniture? By that, I mean in terms of toxicity, or that it is wildly unsuitable. I don't mean in terms of my p!ss-poor joinery... :D

Thanks
 

Sgian Dubh

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disco_monkey79":1zyw1ixa said:
Is there any compelling reason why I shouldn't use this for furniture?
No reason that I'm aware of preventing you using it for that. It's more commonly thought of as a timber with applications externally - posts, trailer bottoms, fencing, gates, that sort of thing because it's durable and tough. Attractive stuff finds uses in cabinetry and joinery, but it is a coarse textured wood. As far as I recall (a long time since I used it, probably decades), it tends to be relatively unstable with a tendency to twist and warp. Slainte.
 

AJB Temple

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The compelling reason from my experience is: a) it is not stable enough for furniture or instruments unless always optimally treated (moves a lot with humidity and temp variation), and b) it does not finish well for fine work unless you are lucky with stable grain. This may explain why it is rarely seen in the UK.
 

Ttrees

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Seen some nice long straight grown stock on the luthiers forum
Hampton Brothers on eBay sell some, but not as good as what I've seen on the forum.
 

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dzj

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Over here, when it's plantation grown, wide, long trunks are not that uncommon.
In the past, I remember making seats and legs for quite a few bar stools. Made a lot of stair treads too. It's a pretty hard wood and if your blades are freshly sharpened, it machines well. When it's seasoned properly and the grain is straight, I have not heard of it 'misbehaving'.
It has a kind of yellow/ greenish colour and can be finished in the usual ways.
 

disco_monkey79

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Thanks all for the replies, reckon I'll give it a try. My stuff tends to be a little rustic (both in design, and in execution :) ), so if the wood ends up a little wibbly, then no harm done.

I need to build a kitchen and a bed. I'll try it for bedroom furniture, ads nothing steamy happens in there to cause moisture content changes...
 
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