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Protecting drying timber.

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trevtheturner

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Having bought loads of oak at auctions this year, it is now in stick in the loft above my workshop. So the wood is protected from rain and sunlight and the loft is airy and well ventilated but I live in the country with lots of old trees, some dead and no doubt full of bugs, on adjoining land. The old oak roof timbers in the loft have previously had worm infestation but I treated them when I moved in 9 years ago and there has been no sign of any fresh activity.

However, I am considering whether I should spray my stock of oak with a woodworm treatment as a precaution. Can anybody assist with whether or not this might have a detrimental effect on the timber, particularly when I start using it for furnitue in due course? At present it is in its sawn state.

Any views will be appreciated.

Trev.
 
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Anonymous

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Trev

I have done this in the past as a protection method and experience no ill effects when I've come to use the wood.

Waka
 

Chris Knight

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Trev, I have sprayed wood a few months before use and found no detrimental effect on appearance (Black walnut in my case). I guess a bit of colouration might show up on a light coloured wood but nothing to worry about in oak I would have thought. Ideally you want to spray into any worm holes if present.

I have recently taken to cleaning up sawn timber with an electric plane (I use a Bosch hand held jobbie), rather than leaving it in storage as rough sawn. This allows me to see what I am dealing with much better - particularly important in a load of English walnut I am presently working with - and exposes any worm holes that might be hard to see in the sawn state.

Certainly strip off any bark if it's waney edged stuff, it provides a lovely home for all sorts of wildlife.
 
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