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wallace

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Hi all, this might sound very silly but could someone give me a little 'plane' education. What do the the various numbers mean on planes. Like a stanley No5 and so on. Do they denote differant blade angles or plane lengths.
thanks Mark
 

Vann

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wallace":ukqvi5k8 said:
What do the the various numbers mean on planes. Like a stanley No5 and so on. Do they denote differant blade angles or plane lengths.
The numbers don't mean anything, they're Stanleys numbering system. For planes No.1 to No.8 they denote size (with No.1 being the smallest). Then they later introduced wide versions of the No.4 & No.5 - the No.4½ & No.5½. Then a narrow version of the No.5 - the No.5¼. Above No.8 it all goes to custard.

However many later manufacturers followed Stanleys system. Take for example the Stanley No.5, Record call their equivalent a No.05, while Rapier called it a No.500.

As cambournepete says Patrick's Blood & Gore describes all the Stanley planes by number, and can be an entertaining read. HTH.

Cheers, Vann.
 

marcros

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you may also find that some of the models are relatively plentiful in the USA, but almost unavailable over here
 

bugbear

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Vann":1unznh48 said:
wallace":1unznh48 said:
What do the the various numbers mean on planes. Like a stanley No5 and so on. Do they denote differant blade angles or plane lengths.
The numbers don't mean anything, they're Stanleys numbering system. For planes No.1 to No.8 they denote size (with No.1 being the smallest). Then they later introduced wide versions of the No.4 & No.5 - the No.4½ & No.5½. Then a narrow version of the No.5 - the No.5¼. Above No.8 it all goes to custard.

However many later manufacturers followed Stanleys system. Take for example the Stanley No.5, Record call their equivalent a No.05, while Rapier called it a No.500.

As cambournepete says Patrick's Blood & Gore describes all the Stanley planes by number, and can be an entertaining read. HTH.

Cheers, Vann.
Some American manufacturers used completely different numbers (Union, Millers Falls, Sargent), but examples of these are fairly rare in the UK.

But most people in conversation use the Stanley numbers.

BugBear
 

wallace

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Thanks for that chaps. One more thing, I recently got given a paramo plane master. Its from the sixties and has disposable blades. Is it any good and can the blades be found anywhere.
Mark
 

Alf

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bugbear":129jxkix said:
But most people in conversation use the Stanley numbers.
Well, to be absolutely accurate, most people in conversation will say "You what? Oh for the love of Mike, are you talking about planes again?! When are you going to stop measuring your damn shavings and make me that burfl you said you'd build five years ago?" But yeah, other than them...

Scouse is your man for words of encouragement about the Paramo. The majority feeling tends to usually be that they're... not good. Can't recall - do the Stanley RB10 blades fit the Paramo? Can you still get those? Does anyone want to get them? Anyway, a forum search for Paramo will provide possibly several minutes of entertainment on the matter.
 
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