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heimlaga

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Most of my hand tools are either old and restored/repaired/rebuilt or entirely home made from scratch. Most of my machines too.

It is a matter of time versus money. If you have time buy secondhand and rebuild. If you have money buy new. If both time and money are in short supply byúy a few new tools to get the hang of things and speed up your learning curve then buy the rest secondhand.
 

OCtoolguy

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Well, let's start with some background.
I don't have much family history of cabinet making to rely on. Besides a few summer months, I spent watching a backgammon maker and a few boxes I made in my uncle's basement.

I rediscovered my love of working with wood in recent years.
A novice to hand tool I started self-learning and studied a few methods for each task.

I took on the advice “ you don't need expensive tools to make good products” and headed to eBay for some second-hand old tools.
I followed the instructions and tuned the planes and sharpened the blades. Combination of lack of knowledge and tools which might have had an structural issue caused me to spend more time tuning my planes than planing my timbers.

That caused me to decide to get tools which has less chance of a structural problem and are easier to maintain.

I have been told again and again that “expensive tools don't make you a good woodworker”

The question I would like to ask is: I your honest opinion for someone with limited time and expertise which hand tools are better?
An uncertain eBay second hand or a well made new tool?

I appreciate all of your opinions.
I guess it all depends on your pocketbook. I used to buy all the best and greatest brand new. That was back when I had an income. Now that I'm retired I buy nothing but used tools. I do my research on brand, model etc. and once I've homed in on what I want, I start the search. So far, I have a full shop of just about everything I'll ever need. And I think the only new tools I have are a couple that I bought at our Harbor Freight store when on a sale too good to pass up. Also, I have 2 B&D 20 volt drills and batteries purchased new online. That's it. So, be patient, do your homework and start looking. Good luck to you.
 

Sean33

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Well, let's start with some background.
I don't have much family history of cabinet making to rely on. Besides a few summer months, I spent watching a backgammon maker and a few boxes I made in my uncle's basement.

I rediscovered my love of working with wood in recent years.
A novice to hand tool I started self-learning and studied a few methods for each task.

I took on the advice “ you don't need expensive tools to make good products” and headed to eBay for some second-hand old tools.
I followed the instructions and tuned the planes and sharpened the blades. Combination of lack of knowledge and tools which might have had an structural issue caused me to spend more time tuning my planes than planing my timbers.

That caused me to decide to get tools which has less chance of a structural problem and are easier to maintain.

I have been told again and again that “expensive tools don't make you a good woodworker”

The question I would like to ask is: I your honest opinion for someone with limited time and expertise which hand tools are better?
An uncertain eBay second hand or a well made new tool?

I appreciate all of your opinions.
Difficult this as im not sure there is a right or wrong answer or opinion.
I have done both and sure will continue to do so but what I can say is that finally spending money on a good grinding system made a huge difference with the 2nd hand tools. Only my opinion but if you go down the 2nd hand route a Tormek and a couple of good stones makes all the difference
I quite often hear the argument that I only paid 20 quid for it and sold it for a similar amount, but that can be said of the premium brands too albeit in the 100s
For me its what you enjoy to use, gives you confidence and feels right in your hands
 

Ttrees

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this is worth watching too, I did this to all my cap irons and wow what a difference:


If working on really tough examples, likely in most cases that better results can be achieved by going steeper, ie above 50 degrees,
as it allows a greater distance to be set away from the edge.
Many reasons why this is an improvement IMO

More camber is achievable on the toughest examples when smoothing,
or even just if you like to be able to see a distance between both.

Handy to have an influenced cut when using timbers which might have embedded grit,
its much less likely to cause damage to the cap also.

Always handy to be able to gain more influence if needed on say a panel/jack/try plane without switching over to the smoother.

Possibly other reasons too, which doesn't come to mind.
Not to mention that one might not achieve a tearout free surface in the first place honing the cap so low.
Yet to see a reason why one wouldn't want this steep of a profile,
unless one wants a tight mouth for some reason like end grain beveling...
which is the only one I've read of.

Still waiting for Charlesworth to make a newer really good video, of both the newer setup and use of the plane,
as I understand from a skype conversation he had with Cosman, he has changed things slightly since the much older videos he has made.

I haven't seen anything which holds a candle to the old video he made which was recorded at a woodworking show.
Simply foolproof methodology on the use of the plane, for one who really wants to get the best from their tools.

An unmatched approach if dimensioning timber without machinery.
i.e no bad habits which is on near every other planing video I've ever seen to date, and I'm no slouch when I'm on the couch!

The other David on here, has made articles on the cap iron, and combined with above is a match which was made in heaven.

All the best
Tom
 

yetloh

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all you need in my opinion plane wise is a no7 no5 or 5 1/2 and no 4 or4/12 for all planing duties, I'd go with vintage ones with the bog standard stock blade and cap irons. I don't have anything against using premium modern tools like veritas and LN if you have the money for it, why not? they are often so well set up that you don't need to do anything to them, so when you consider how much work it can take to get an old one into the same league as a LN it's not such a bad idea.
All these are good to have but there is a notable omission - I regard a block plane as essential and I am sure I will not be alone in saying I use mine at least as much as any other.

Otherwise , a lot of good advice in this thread but just one point from the OP's original message; high quality tools won't make you a top woodworker but there is no question that they will make it easier for you to do good work if they are well tuned and maintained.

Jim
 

Ollie78

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I agree with yetloh about a block plane, I have a low angle one and its probably my most used plane.
It depends on what work you do but I find the block plane so handy.
The block plane and the record 73 shoulder plane stay in my main handtool box that goes everywhere with me.
I leave the bigger or more specialist ones in the workshop.

Ollie
 

yetloh

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Which planes do I need? That's a rabbit hole. I have a nice low angle Stanley block plane - I think I can count on the fingers of one hand the number of times I've used it in the last three decades or so.
We all have our own ways of working but I would say you are unusual. I know quite a lot of furniture makers and have yet to meet one who does not regard a block plane as essential. I recall that the late great Alan Peters reckoned to use only a No 7 and a block plane, I don't think I could manage with only those two but it just shows how different we all are.

Jim
 

Brill88

Tom Brill general woodworker and woodsman
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I've brought a few back to life and sold others spares/repairs. I want to hang on to my 100% rating! No profit in it particularly.
I’m the same people aren’t daft with tools generally it’s hidden things or if someone doesn’t show the mouth on a plane with a big crack even if the side may have a repair you make not of it my eBay is clean bar one person but that was chainsaw trousers but he’s a scammer as it turned out so no bother
 

Richie555

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Hi Smalmaleki, When I was learning I did a carpentry/Woodworking course in my local college. This not only gave me the joinery skills but it taught me which tools were important and which were a luxury. I also used YouTube to watch specific skill videos and as my knowledge progressed I started buying old and eventually antique tools and enjoyed restoring them. In the last year I have restored Planes, Chisels and now a complete tool chest and tools. Many people on this forum have also helped me out, I would like to thank them for helping me progress and hopefully I can pass that knowledge on in the future. I hope this helps?. Regards and I look forward to seeing your progress in the future.

Richard.

 

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