New (thinner) riving knife for diamond blade

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scholar

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I am short of ideas on where to spend my money 🤥, so am looking at trying out a diamond table saw blade - these seem to have good reports (but are an expensive initial outlay).

Anyway, the ones I am looking at have a 2.4 or 2.5mm kerf and recommend a 2.0mm riving knife. My existing riving knife is 2.8mm (and I think all my current blades are 3.2mm kerf).

Does anyone have any suggestions about how I get a suitable riving knife made and what material to specify? Obviously, I have the pattern that can be taken from the existing riving knife.

cheers

EDIT

I changed the title to refer to the diamond blade point. This is the video I saw initially and then found the CMT blades that Scosarg sell (see later).

 
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Ttrees

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Hello
Your query might be likely to open up a can o worms.
What kerf and plate thickness are these blades that I haven't heard of before?
I can't remember what my blade thickness is, but know the teeth are be 3.2mm.
I had some stainless lying around, which is 3mm and it works great.
Used an angle grinder and some files, was simple job.
I copied the old RK and should have researched this further before doing so.

Steve Maskery mentioned this plenty of times, but I didn't click what he was saying.
He mentioned that it's a better idea to have it mounted i.e bolt through a hole,
rather than being able to slot the knife down through when the bolt is loosened,
Steve's suggestion was because the knife is trapped in a elongated hole, rather than coming
loose and possibly getting thrown out of the machine.
Any more slots or anything else, it might not be a good idea to copy if these might be a bit of a sloppy fit for a standard bolt.

Right or wrong, I have read an interesting post here before about what is best,
obviously thinner than the kerf, but thicker the plate, but by how much??

There was talk of blade wear involved, so seems a bit of a gray area.
To me (I'm a novice hobbyist) up to 0.5mm of a difference sounds a bit strange.
I would want to see what the plate thickness is before I made one, guessing it's the same
plate for both kerfs.
It sounds very strange that this isn't mentioned, are you sure these blades are reputable?

I'll see if i can dig the post up.

There could be other factors too, like if you're saw has blade stiffeners or not.

Edit I think this is the thread I was on about, but there is a heck of a lot of riving knife threads on the archives, so likely much more in depth threads regarding the original question posted.
I'd thought it were a bit more thorough than a page or two, but can't remember.


Tom
 
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Orraloon

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I have to ask just what will you be cutting with this diamond blade and do you have a pic or a link to them. Far as I know diamond blades are for brick,stone and other hard stuff not for a woodworking saw.
Regards
John
 

Sachakins

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Taken from an article by TYLER LACOMA

Will Cutting Wood With a Diamond Blade Hurt It?
Diamond saw blades are made with teeth that have been coated in a strong carbon grit mixture. These saw blades are designed to cut through materials that would wear away normal blades, including stone, clay, concrete and similar substances. Diamond blades are usually designed for these tough materials. Trying to cut wood with a diamond saw might not lead to good results.

Wood Cutting Blades
Carbide-tipped saw blades are designed especially for wood. These are similar to diamond saw blades, but are designed with teeth and coatings that will make it easier to cut wood, especially hardwoods. If you do want to use a diamond saw blade, ensure that you use a carbide version that is specifically designed for wood.

Diamond Saw Damage
Diamond saws are designed to be the most durable blades for the most difficult saw projects. You will not need to worry about damaging the diamond saw blade itself. These blades are made to withstand stone materials. The soft fibers of wood boards will not hurt the blade itself. The danger is in how the diamond blade treats the wood itself.
General Purpose of Diamond Blades
General purpose dry diamond saw blades can be used for several materials, but reconsider before using them to cut wood. The harsh grit of the diamond blade can cut tile and masonry with straight lines. When applied to wood, however, the blades might create a rough cut, ripping apart fibers, or might make it too easy to create crooked cuts. In most cases, it is better to use a traditional steel blade for wood.
 

ScottandSargeant

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Taken from an article by TYLER LACOMA

Will Cutting Wood With a Diamond Blade Hurt It?
Diamond saw blades are made with teeth that have been coated in a strong carbon grit mixture. These saw blades are designed to cut through materials that would wear away normal blades, including stone, clay, concrete and similar substances. Diamond blades are usually designed for these tough materials. Trying to cut wood with a diamond saw might not lead to good results.

Wood Cutting Blades
Carbide-tipped saw blades are designed especially for wood. These are similar to diamond saw blades, but are designed with teeth and coatings that will make it easier to cut wood, especially hardwoods. If you do want to use a diamond saw blade, ensure that you use a carbide version that is specifically designed for wood.

Diamond Saw Damage
Diamond saws are designed to be the most durable blades for the most difficult saw projects. You will not need to worry about damaging the diamond saw blade itself. These blades are made to withstand stone materials. The soft fibers of wood boards will not hurt the blade itself. The danger is in how the diamond blade treats the wood itself.
General Purpose of Diamond Blades
General purpose dry diamond saw blades can be used for several materials, but reconsider before using them to cut wood. The harsh grit of the diamond blade can cut tile and masonry with straight lines. When applied to wood, however, the blades might create a rough cut, ripping apart fibers, or might make it too easy to create crooked cuts. In most cases, it is better to use a traditional steel blade for wood.
This is misinformed. Diamond sawblades are excellent for wood, but expensive. This article is describing diamond grit saw blades on wood. For wood one should be using a PCD chip brazed onto a steel body.
 

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ScottandSargeant

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I am short of ideas on where to spend my money 🤥, so am looking at trying out a diamond table saw blade - these seem to have good reports (but are an expensive initial outlay).

Anyway, the ones I am looking at have a 2.4 or 2.5mm kerf and recommend a 2.0mm riving knife. My existing riving knife is 2.8mm (and I think all my current blades are 3.2mm kerf).

Does anyone have any suggestions about how I get a suitable riving knife made and what material to specify? Obviously, I have the pattern that can be taken from the existing riving knife.

cheers
We keep thin riving knives in stock for this application .. message me a picture of your existing one with dimensions, which blade you’re considering and I will see what we have that might be suitable
 

scholar

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We keep thin riving knives in stock for this application .. message me a picture of your existing one with dimensions, which blade you’re considering and I will see what we have that might be suitable

Thanks @ScottandSargeant

It was indeed looking at your listing of the CMT blades that got me thinking. (This was following seeing a review of the Felder diamond blade offering that I understand is made by AKE).

Regarding the riving knife, I have read further that the material recommended is gauge plate aka ground flat stock which seems to be readily available (in 2mm in my case). I think it is a bit demanding to work, but I am thinking my basic metalworking skills (and equipment) would enable me to fashion a copy from my existing riving knife. Nevertheless, I will get in touch on this with you.

Cheers
 
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ScottandSargeant

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Thanks @ScottandSargeant

It was indeed looking at your listing of the CMT blades that got me thinking. (This was following seeing a review of the Felder diamond blade offering that I understand is made by AKE).

Regarding the riving knife, I have read further that the material recommended is gauge plate aka ground flat stock which seems to be readily available (in 2mm in my case). I think it is a bit demanding to work, but I am thinking my basic metalworking skills (and equipment) would enable me to fashion a copy from my existing riving knife. Nevertheless, I will get in touch on this with you.

Cheers
They are normally made from a hardened /spring type steel, to maintain some flexibilty without getting bent
 

Sandyn

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That is a very impressive blade, like cutting and sanding in one operation, but too many limitations on it's use for the type of DIY stuff I do and way outside my price range. It's an industrial quality blade. I can see it being very useful for professionals cutting a lot of MDF and ply where quality of finish is ultra important.
I still want one, even though I don't have a suitable saw to use it on!!
 
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