Quantcast
  • We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Lurem 210B

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

mack22

Established Member
Joined
18 Oct 2011
Messages
27
Reaction score
0
Location
Hertfordshire
Thanks to all who replied over my last question, I have had to fit a new electric motor, I found a TEC 2 pole 1.5hp 2810 RPM motor fitted ok after a slight bit of alteration , I am assuming, having looked at the required speed of the saw and planner that the drive for these is via the 40mm pulley, and that the 80mm pulley is just for the spindle moulder drive.
The drawing shown in the Lurem instruction book that's on the web, shows all drives being taken from the 80mm pulley, a wee bit confusing, can anyone please confirm that it is the 40mm as I first thought.
Thank you.
 

roadman

Member
Joined
20 Apr 2010
Messages
10
Reaction score
0
Location
Oregon USA
My C.210.b's 2-pole single phase motor and two-step pulley were targeted to the north american 60hz power grid so the diameters are accordingly smaller.
I don't think the machine's other pulley diameters differ from the european counterparts though, nor do the cutting speed specs.

Neglecting the flat spindle belt, the pitch diameters are probably 10mm greater than the measurements in the grooves, so all of the turns ratios are lower than the ratios of diameters.

The larger motor pulley is used for the planer, spindle w/french head or small blocks, boring and smaller morticing bits, and with the saw, whose arbor pulley is the largest of the driven pulleys at 49mm in the groove.

The smaller motor pulley is used with the spindle for large diameter (over 6") tooling and with larger morticing bits.

If this is not the pattern for the 50 hz systems then some of the driven pulleys must differ in size from mine as well.

Art

Edit: here's an image of the belting diagram stuck to the tinwork to the left of the saw (missing on mine as received)...this was from an online 2nd hand offering so save a copy before the link goes stale.

 

mack22

Established Member
Joined
18 Oct 2011
Messages
27
Reaction score
0
Location
Hertfordshire
Thanks for that information Art, its just as well I asked as a friend is going to make a pulley for me as the old pulley had a bit of the side wall missing also the new motor has a different shaft size..
Did you feel the need to use a direct line starter to protect the motor from overload, as I have no idea what type of switch was supplied with it when new..
 

roadman

Member
Joined
20 Apr 2010
Messages
10
Reaction score
0
Location
Oregon USA
mack22":394v19ya said:
Thanks for that information Art, its just as well I asked as a friend is going to make a pulley for me as the old pulley had a bit of the side wall missing also the new motor has a different shaft size..
Did you feel the need to use a direct line starter to protect the motor from overload, as I have no idea what type of switch was supplied with it when new..
If you're having a new pulley fabricated, let me share all of my numbers just in case my driven pulleys differ from yours.
Planer 29-1/2 mm in the trough, 44mm at the rim.
Saw 49 mm in the trough, 63 at the rim.
Spindle 39 mm
Small motor 39-1/2 mm in the trough, 56 at the rim
Large motor 64-1/2 mm in the trough, 81 at the rim.
Again, figure belted pitch diameters 10-11mm larger than the troughs, except using the thin flat belt with the spindle.

Notably, the ratio of large and small motor pulley diameters is closer than implied by your numbers in the original post. From my numbers I would have guessed something like 80mm and 50mm for 50 hz rather than 80 and 40; but I suppose the consequence falls mainly on the lower spindle moulder speed and in that sense should be a function of the diameter of one's larger tooling.

My combi's motor is the original, a J_M_ Legendre NE80, badged for 1.5kW at 60 hz/3430rpm so I presume its rotor, windings, and centrifugal switching mechanism are 60-hz-specific for north american import. The start and run caps are remotely housed and the starter is what I would call an IEC manual starter -- a plastic-shelled BBC device with a hidden trimpot for the adjustable-range overload mechanism. The whole scheme more or less matches Lurem's monophase wiring diagram, except for the 50 vs 60 hz distinction.
Even if not required by local regulation, a motor of this size having no internal overload protection should be controlled with a manual or magnetic starter providing thermal/overcurrent (if not also under-/over-voltage) protection. At some point I will ditch the BBC manual starter for a NEMA magnetic starter to facilitate placement of multiple start/stop pushbutton and paddle stations around the machine.

Art
 

mack22

Established Member
Joined
18 Oct 2011
Messages
27
Reaction score
0
Location
Hertfordshire
Art thanks for the information, I sent my engineering friend a revised drawing for a double pulley, I will now look on the web for an on line starter with overload protection as it make sense to protect the motor if something jams up whilst in use.
Once again, thanks for your helpful advice.
 

9fingers

Established Member
Joined
26 Jul 2005
Messages
5,000
Reaction score
1
Location
Romsey, Hampshire
Toolstation sell DOL starters with space in the box to fit your choice of overload trip to match the motor.
Last one I fitted worked out at around £30 for the pair. Free delivery too!

Bob
 

mack22

Established Member
Joined
18 Oct 2011
Messages
27
Reaction score
0
Location
Hertfordshire
Thanks Bob, I forgot about Tool Station, yet I have used them many times and they are opposite our local Screwfix in Wembley which is handy, now bought one from there..
 

9fingers

Established Member
Joined
26 Jul 2005
Messages
5,000
Reaction score
1
Location
Romsey, Hampshire
They are generally pretty good. A lot of their hand tools are silverline brand which can vary wildly from good to not fit for purpose but they seem consistently cheaper than Screwfix, have better stock levels and the over a tenner postage deal is very useful and reliably next working day I find.

Bob
 
Top