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Looking for grain filler / sealer advice

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polomora

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Hello,

I was forwarded to this site from the newsgroup uk.d-i-y.
I've been browsing this section, looking for help with grain filling, but, as a beginner, I couldn't find any in introductory help.

I recently bought a second-hand dark-oak wall cabinet, which I had sandblasted, to bring back the original light-oak colour. I chose this method instead of dipping because I was advised that dipping would not be good for oak, especially where some of the pieces are veneered.

I would like to fill the grooves and try to achieve a smooth finish before varnishing. I was reading up about grain filling, and I don't really know how to go about it. Googling gave me some results:
This video uses a thick paste, that also darkens the wood, which defeats the purpose
< Cannot post link >
This article uses a paste filler:
< Cannot post link >
This article discusses four ways: repeated coats of varnish, prepared water-based filler, an oil slurry and commercial oil-based paste filler:
< Cannot post link >
Sorry, the site doesn't allow me to post web links.

My local DIY shop sells a paint-on filler. The shop assistants don't really know how to use it. If I use this filler, should the surface be horizontal, to allow the filler to stay in the grain? Will the filler darken the wood?

Confused...

Paul

Many thanks
 

devonwoody

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Hello and welcome.

You have used the word "groove" which is off putting and most probably scared some people away from giving advice.

I suspect you most probably mean grain?

(I appreciate your location and I think it is most probably a translation quirk)
 

RogerS

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Grain filler is a misnomer. Grain fillers are usually used on very porous wood like mahogany and sink just below the surface...the idea being to resist the temptation for any applied finish to, well, dribble its way through the wood.

The trouble with sandblasting is that it will wear away the softwood quicker than the harder bits...resulting in the grooves that you have found. Have you tried sanding? Depending on how bad the grooves are start with something like a 120 grit then 180 grit. For hardwood like oak you don;t really need to go down any further in grit size.

If you use any filler then it's going to show at the end of the day.
 

RogerS

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But if you go back and look at the OP he isn't talking about the open pores that grain filler is designed for...

He's got ruddy great valleys in between the harder wood !
 

devonwoody

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Palomora,

If you are a dealer sell it with whats called the distressed look!

Its all the rage over here at our antique shows.



I think what ever treatment you try if it is as bad as it sounds, nothing will really solve this one.
 

RogerS

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devonwoody":6dkkcaja said:
Palomora,

If you are a dealer sell it with whats called the distressed look!

Its all the rage over here at our antique shows.



I think what ever treatment you try if it is as bad as it sounds, nothing will really solve this one.
Cabinet scraper.
 

Dangermouse

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Never, never, NEVER sandblast anything made of wood!!!!!!!!!!!
 
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