• We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Leylandii

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

WoodMangler

Established Member
Joined
7 Oct 2011
Messages
392
Reaction score
0
Location
Mid-west Wales
Until I saw the 6th post in https://www.ukworkshop.co.uk/forums/wood-id-please-and-thin-sided-bowl-t64356.html:
unless there was any leylandii in your firewood pile
I was under the impression that it was useless for anything woodwork- or woodturn-ish. I have a big pile of the stuff in a field, in logs anything up to a foot diameter, from chopping down a hedge that had been allowed to run away for decades. It's been sitting out in all weathers for a couple of years, is it worth me moving some indoors now and letting it dry and season naturally ?
 

KimG

Little Woodworm
Joined
2 Jul 2012
Messages
1,116
Reaction score
17
Location
Pembs
Considering we turn practically anything we get our hands on why not? It's a very soft timber, but it might look good turned, got to be worth a try at least. I have not tried it myself so can give no clues as to any problem it might have (difficult to finish etc)
 

CHJ

Established Member
Joined
31 Dec 2004
Messages
20,130
Reaction score
74
Location
Cotswolds UK
If it has been lying outside for a considerable time you might find it is too late. The logs/trunks left stacked in my garden collected a whole host of critters and ended up as critter foder of wet rot compost.

Personally having spent time playing with it in the past, leylandii is now in my 'don't bother' category,
Still a good for shavings production if you are new to turning and don't get disapointed with the risk of achieving a lack of 'fine display pieces' at the end of a session though.
 

WoodMangler

Established Member
Joined
7 Oct 2011
Messages
392
Reaction score
0
Location
Mid-west Wales
Thanks you all. I don't think it's too far gone, I'll drag a few pieces indoors and forget about them for a couple of years :)
 

Bodrighy

Established Member
Joined
6 Jan 2007
Messages
5,818
Reaction score
0
Location
Bromham, Wiltshire
Odd, the leylandii I have turned was surprisingly hard and had some nice colouring in it. Definitely leylandii. Very plain cream, with some streaks of brown through it. Bottom line any wood is worth turning at least once in my book, if only for practice.

Pete
 

Tomsk

Established Member
Joined
19 Sep 2009
Messages
51
Reaction score
0
Location
Ossett, West Yorks
I have loads of it, cut spring this year, approximately 18" diameter and 5' lengths that's destined for firewood in a few years time. I guess some of it could get sidetracked...

It's horribly sappy, so can't imagine it being good for turning green!
 

Lionwood

New member
Joined
14 Jan 2013
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Location
Buckinghamshire
Lovely stuff! Logs dry without much splitting. End grain turning works well and can give a very fine finish. It also has a powerful resinous smell and scents the air for weeks when you bring it indoors.
 

12345Peter

Established Member
Joined
8 Dec 2011
Messages
167
Reaction score
0
Location
South Bucks
The lleylandi I have turned was nothing like pine, it is quite hard, lovely to turn except for the smell which is like cat pee. Maybe there are different species as I have heard people say it smells like pine, but none of the stuff I have turned smells nice, but it has all had great figuring and it finishes really well.

Regards
Peter
 
Top