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laying reclaimed floorboards on to screed

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stillfirm

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Hi, I am looking at flooring a 20 year old ground floor extension with reclaimed floorboards (timber tbc as I am literally at investigation stage). the floor is concrete screed and will be finished level.

I am thinking a base layer of thermal underlay, but then not sure on fixing the boards them selves. I am aware of leaving an expansion gap around the edges of the room which the skirting will cover.

I would really welcome the forum's wealth of knowledge on this subject!
 

Lons

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The first thing to ensure is that if new screed or levelling compound it must be allowed to dry fully before putting down boards. New concrete can take at least a month and sometimes more. It must also have a reliable DPM.
That said, you could stick the boards to the floor with a proprietory flooring adhesive or lay it as a floating floor over an underlay like laminate or use one of the foam base underlay which has an adhesive to one side (laid uppermost), which holds the boards together but allows expansion movement. I've used this method a number of times over the years for oak T&G and it works very well. http://www.screwfix.com/p/self-adhesive ... id=1398106

Bob
 

andersonec

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The damp proof barrier and thermal insulation should be under the screed then battens are screwed to the screed and boards fixed to them, you could also put polystyrene between the battens to deaden the sound.

Andy
 

Noel

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andersonec":1emu7xzl said:
The damp proof barrier and thermal insulation should be under the screed then battens are screwed to the screed and boards fixed to them, you could also put polystyrene between the battens to deaden the sound.

Andy
Exactly, as Andy has said. Screwed batons will also give the floor some "life". Also with batons you can blind nail on the tongue or use cut nails through the surface which will give the floor character. And lay them randomly rather than picking and choosing each board.
With this method you will not have too much problem if you need to lift them due to leaking pipes, damage etc.
 

Lons

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Noel":21fi8h1u said:
andersonec":21fi8h1u said:
The damp proof barrier and thermal insulation should be under the screed then battens are screwed to the screed and boards fixed to them, you could also put polystyrene between the battens to deaden the sound.

Andy
Exactly, as Andy has said. Screwed batons will also give the floor some "life". Also with batons you can blind nail on the tongue or use cut nails through the surface which will give the floor character. And lay them randomly rather than picking and choosing each board.
With this method you will not have too much problem if you need to lift them due to leaking pipes, damage etc.
Definately the best scenario method but what I've found in every single case is that the increase in floor height would produce a step up into the room/s which has been unacceptable to my customers and therefore not possible.

Great if building an extension from scratch or say a whole ground floor for instance, but not when you need a reasonably level transition from other existing surfaces such as carpet.

Bob
 

stillfirm

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thanks for your thoughts guys - i had contemplated the the batoning, but given i am running boards from the front door through to the back of the house through the kitchen, there would be step downs in to the lounge + dining rooms (carpet), and would also cause me problems with the planned install of level threshold bifold doors.

i am liking the idea of thermal underlay strips, with a sticky topto hold the boards - do you think it would be an issue to use non t&g with this method?
 

stillfirm

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also just looking online for other wood floor adhesives - can this stuff be applied to foam underlays or should it just go straight on to the concrete/levelling compound?
 

Lons

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stillfirm":3rxx4sen said:
also just looking online for other wood floor adhesives - can this stuff be applied to foam underlays or should it just go straight on to the concrete/levelling compound?
If using std adhesive it needs to stick the boards direct to the floor.

It is possible to use square edge boards but I wouldn't personally and if you can't get / make T&G, another method is a loose tongue (groove all edges say 6 mm and rip up some 6mm ply for the tongues.)

Adhesive foam works well but there is an art to using it. You should find video around on the net if you look but basically I lay out some of the underlay plastic cover side up, peel back just enough of the film to stick down the first row of boards, feed in the next row slowly pulling back the film as you go.
I use the strap clamps for laminate flooring to pull the joints tight first as you don't get a second chance. The adhesive sticks like s*** to a blanket

Easier than it sounds but have to do it right or you'll spend hours lifting it and scraping off the back of the boards :wink:

I'm happy to post you a small scrap bit to play with if you pm me your address. I keep all the offcuts as it's excellent for lining drawers and toolboxes in the workshop as well as under the bases of ornaments, carvings and turnings.

Bob
 
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