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mailee

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I am undecided how to insulate my new wooden workshop for the winter. I want to keep costs down but am not sure which would be the best route to take. Should I use polystyrene sheets in between the framework or fibreglass insulation as used in lofts or fibreglass boards? It is getting cold now so I need to move soon as I want to keep working through the winter. Any suggestions? Thanks.
 

ProShop

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The fibreglass type gets my vote, you can get a similar product (non fibreglass) which is even better. If you then fix plywood sheets on to the framework afterwards you'll end up with a very strong & warm shed.
 

Howjoe

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FelderMan":3unwrwx1 said:
The fibreglass type gets my vote, you can get a similar product (non fibreglass) which is even better. If you then fix plywood sheets on to the framework afterwards you'll end up with a very strong & warm shed.
This is what I've done, and am pleased with it so far. 100mm Loft insulation sandwiched between shed wall and 6mm ply. The roof has been done this way too.

Cheers,

Howard
 

Freetochat

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I went the polystyrene route, and I am pleased with the result. I have used loft insulation in the past but in time got some sag.
 

paulm

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I think you are supposed to use some builders paper or similar as well as the insulation, but forget whether it goes in first, against the external skin and before the insulation, or goes in after the insulation and before the internal skin.

:-k
 

Sailor

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In theory, builders paper or similar should be on the outside of the studs before the cladding, the idea being that there is then a slight space which helps reduce the possibility of condensation forming on the inside of the external cladding. Insulation then on top of the paper and then your internal cladding.

Poly insulations have a higher insulation value at an equivalent thickness to fibreglass but is relatively far more expensive and harder to fit if your studs aren't exactly at the correct distances apart. The alternatives are Warmcell, a recycled paper which is very good and can be blown in; or, on mine, I used sheeps wool which is great and fills every crack and hole.

HTH

Colin
 

dickm

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Sailor":1bg8c24b said:
In theory, builders paper or similar should be on the outside of the studs before the cladding, the idea being that there is then a slight space which helps reduce the possibility of condensation forming on the inside of the external cladding. Insulation then on top of the paper and then your internal cladding.

Colin
Are you sure? I thought you were supposed to put the insulation against the outer skin, then the dampproof membrane, then the inner skin. The theory, as I understood it, was that this prevented the warm wet air from inside getting into the insulation and then cooling down and dropping moisture within the insulation.
I've done my shed this way, and it seems to work. But maybe there is a civil engineer on the list can settle this.
 

Scrit

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FelderMan":2gin33sp said:
.... you can get a similar product (non fibreglass) which is even better. ....
The stuff is called Rockwool or mineral wool. Has similar R-value to FG but much better sound insulation properties.

Scrit
 

matt

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I thought about insluating my garage but it hasn't proved necessary. I have a small fan heater set on a very low stat, meaning that it only switches on every now and again (and stays off overnight etc), and the temp was just fine (even had to take my fleece off occasionally). Insulation would reduce the heat loss; however, I think it would be negligable.

Garage construction = brick walls, ply roof with 2 layes of felt.
 

Taffy Turner

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Sailor":3jwzymkl said:
The alternatives are Warmcell, a recycled paper which is very good and can be blown in; or, on mine, I used sheeps wool which is great and fills every crack and hole.

Colin
I was watching Grand Designs the other day, and they used sheeps wool as the insulation material (the house was in Wales after all!!), and it is supposed to be the business - I think they said it was the most thermally efficient material available, and at no cost to the environment (unlike foamed polyurethane or polystyrene). Also much nicer to handle than fibreglass or Rockwool. 8)

It seems pretty efficient at keeping my sheep warm anyway - she has frost on the outside of her fleece every morning lately, but she is nice and warm inside her genuine sheepskin coat!!! :D

Regards

Taffy
 

Jokerman

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Just how many sheep does it take to insulate a 16x12x9ft shed and where do you get the stuff from? Intrigued and curious really.
 

Scrit

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heanorhorse":38sz9frl said:
Just how many sheep does it take ....
Never mind how many, I want to know how you hold them in place - will my 18g tacker do or do I need something heavier? :lol:

Scrit
 

Jokerman

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Come on Scrit this is a serious question. How on earth do you expect 18g brads to hold up a sheep, no matter how many you put in. The only way has to be drill plug and screw. They tend to make a lot of noise when the drills going in but they soon settle down. Sheep S*** does become a problem after a while but if you sheet up your kit at the end of the day it shouldn't be too bad. Plus it's good for the garden, dug in over Winter - get some good carrots and parsnips next year.

Nice to meet someone with as daft a sense of humour as me. I thought I was the only mad Bu**er out there but now I think there's more than one.

Keep up the good work and have a good evening.
M
 

DaveL

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heanorhorse":okj27kcm said:
I thought I was the only mad Bu**er out there but now I think there's more than one.
What do you mean out there? Most of us are in here! :roll: :wink:
 

Jokerman

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Thanks for that Dave. I may have lost the use of me arms and legs - but not me sense of humour. When that goes it really will be time for the gas oven. Problem is I'm all electric, and I don't like bright sparky lights so any suggestions would be gratefully recieved.

Have a good one
M
 

mailee

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Hey that is a great idea guys. I will have to look out for a few sheep while on my travels. How many do you think I can get in the back of a Volvo estate? I do have a large framing nailer that should do the job of holding them in place. Just one more question though what about all the noise from them, should i fit soundproofing too? :lol: Seriously guys thanks for all the comments even the funny ones after all laughter is the best medicine.
 

devonwoody

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That hard working fellow at Riverside Cottage (chan 4) said the other week that after shearing his sheep the fleece were going to be turned to
"felt".
So would not felt also work as a wall insulation?
 

Taffy Turner

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heanorhorse":3pivc3o3 said:
Come on Scrit this is a serious question. How on earth do you expect 18g brads to hold up a sheep, no matter how many you put in. The only way has to be drill plug and screw. They tend to make a lot of noise when the drills going in but they soon settle down.
M
That is just cruel!!! :roll:

Everyone knows that duct tape is the way to go!!! :D :D Be sure to carry out a full risk assesment to cover the danger of falling sheep though, otherwise you will have HSE after you like a shot! :?

Getting back on track, the wool in question had been procesed into a sort of low density felt. It came on a roll, and was simply cut to size with a large pair of scissors. Seemed like a good system to me.

Regards

Gary
 

Jokerman

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They shoot them in the back of the head, skin them, cut them into pieces and then you roast them for you Sunday dinner, served up with mint sauce. I think compared to that my response was quite animal friendly. Sheep don't eat mint, they don't like it.
My son in law eats it with beef, pork chicken or anything else that's dead, - but he is a bit strange.

Have a good day
M
 

Taffy Turner

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Not me! I don't eat lamb. I don't really like it, and when you have a pet sheep, it tends to put you off eating them!

I don't eat horsemeat either for the same reason (got 12 of the b*gg*rs)!!

Regards

Gary
 

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