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Installing LPG boiler on building control notice ?

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flanajb

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I am in the throws of sorting out a heating solution for my garage. I did contemplate a wood burner have decided that I am going to install a small LPG boiler with a few rads. That way I can get the boiler to come on at certain times and save me freezing to death waiting for the garge to warm up.

I reckon I can do the whole job for 1k, but just need to be sure that I can do the work myself on a building notice ?

The other question surrounds whether a small boiler would be ok to run using the large LPG bottles ?

Thanks
 

tomatwark

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I think you will find that you still need a gas safe plumber to check.

He will have to have the LPG part of the certificate.

If you don't I would guess your insurance may not payout

Tom
 

devonwoody

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Is there a cut off date allowing the installation of LPG boilers, then its wood pellet fuel only or something?
 

jasonB

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I've had a couple of AGAs fitted that ran off propane and they needed a gas safe fitter and there are also restrictions to where the Calor bottles are sited eg can't be lower than surrounding ground level as the gas is heavier than air so a leak can't escape.

Your boiler will need the correct LPG jets as mains gas are different

J
 

Digit

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You will require a Gas Safe engineer to sign it off, before you commit to bottles talk to a supplier about a small tank. LPG in 'bulk' is very much cheaper than in bottles. Positioning of bottles must meet certain criteria as well due to possible leakages seeping into structures.
DW. The new regs come into force in 2013 and 2016 when all new builds must be 'carbon neutral.'

From the Sunday Telegraph, and yes gentlemen it is correct, I checked!

By 2016, as I reported last week, the Government plans to have phased in a requirement that all new homes are “zero carbon”, under its Code for Sustainable Homes. The policy was introduced in 2006 to implement a European directive, 2002/91, on “the energy performance of buildings”, to meet the EU’s commitments under the Kyoto Protocol.

Under the code, every aspect of a new home is awarded points to show how far it meets the “zero carbon” standard – based on anything from the extent to which its energy is derived from “renewable” sources to its provision of internal storage space for eco-friendly bicycles. It was initially estimated that all this would add as much as £40,000, or 66 per cent, to the average cost of a new house (the figures are still on the website of the Department for Communities and Local Government). But the scheme turned out to be so complex and impractical that it has undergone three revisions, relaxing the standards. Now – unless local authorities decide otherwise – those original costs may be halved.

Even though the result will no longer be a “zero carbon” home, the additional cost could still be £15,000 or more. As was stated in a recent report from the Federation of Master Builders, a mere 31 certificates have so far been issued for houses that meet the full standard. Yet by 2016 it will apply universally.

No other country in Europe has implemented the directive in the same tortuous and costly fashion. If Mr Osborne really wants more new homes, he should take time off from his extramural work to examine what the building industry views as a bizarre disaster – all to comply with the Kyoto treaty, which lapses next year anyway.


A tank requires a hard standing, must be visible from the tanker for filling purposes and must not be below power lines etc.

Roy.
 

Digit

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Blimey Mark, you're keen! That must have cost a bob or two!

Roy.
 

Digit

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Look at this way Mark, here it would require dynamite!
I know one chap whose oil tank was sub ground, being a genius he never checked anything till one day his boiler went out. As he put work my way I went out to look at it. The tank was nearly empty, the sump pump was choked, the hole was full of water and the tank had floated, tearing the pipework apart!
Next door to me they installed a septic tank 'bottle', you've probably seen them at builders etc. They dug the hole then stared at it for three days. 'No water lads, put the bottle in'. Note, very dry summer at the time. The first time the tank was emptied, it was a sealed system, the ground water crushed the bottle!
We keep our brick septic tank full of water for the same reason as it sits in hole blasted into Pembroke stone.
Our tank stands above ground! :lol:

Roy.
 

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