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How to make wedges - Lots of them

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Jamesc

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I have recently quoted for my first comercial woodworking project, shhnd held tools along with ould I get it I will have to manufacture 1/2" wide wedges in oak. For each batch I will need between 200 and 500 wedges depending on which product I and working on (commercially sensitive). I have trawled the internet for ideas and so far most of the solutions are just downright scary.

I have a good complement of hand tools along with table saw, radial arm saw, band saw, router table and planer/thicknesser. Obviously I would like to make these as efficiently as possible but the main criteria is consistent quality. Does anyone have any suggestions as to how I might go about making these please.

James
 

doorframe

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Hi. This may not be much help, but there was a thread about making (loads of) wedges on this forum in the last year. I don't have much luck with the Site Search Facility, but you may, or someone may be able to point you to it.

Roy
 

Steve Maskery

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OK
First of all your stock. You need boards that are as LONG as your intended wedge, say 50mm, and as WIDE as you like. So board ends make a good source.

You need a well-tuned bandsaw with a rip blade on it, say 1/2" 3TPI.

You need the saw to cut true, no drift.

You need a piece of MDF with a wedge-shaped notch cut out of the side.

Set your rip fence so that the blade just kisses the edge of your MDF wedge-board.

With the straight edge against your rip fence and the notch running against the blade, put your stock into the notch and make a cut. Flip the workpiece and repeat. Carry on until you have no more wood left!

It's fast and accurate.

S
 

doorframe

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Steve Maskery":1uqe7lnj said:
You need a well-tuned bandsaw with a rip blade on it, say 1/2" 3TPI.

You need the saw to cut true, no drift.

S
I know where he can buy a DVD that'll help with that.... :wink:

Roy
 

Jamesc

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Thanks guys super fast replies, Steve I should have thought of your solution. I bought my father your bandsaw DVDs an snuck a peek before I gave them to him (just to make sure they were OK you nderstand).
Your solution sounds elegant, simple and imediatly ptactical - Thanks
 

woodbloke

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What you also need to do when using Steve's method (which works brilliantly btw) is to keep on flpping the wood through 180deg (i.e. turning it over after each wedge is cut) or else the grain starts to get a bit 'short'...sorry, just seen that Steve's mentioned that as well
Note to self...keep up :oops: - Rob
 

Jamesc

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Now all I have to do is keep my fingers crossed that I get the work, if I do I will post some pictures just to prove it happened :D

James
 

Steve Maskery

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Note about grain direction:
If the grain is straight down the the board all the way across its width, then just start by cutting the end off-square by half the wedge angle before you start. That way the grain is running right down the centre of the wedge( as opposed to parallel with one edge). If it does start to run off, simply recut the end of the workpiece to true up the grain direction again.
S
 

Benchwayze

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Well James.

If I can clear enough space to make a start on the new bench for my lathe, I will try and beat you to it.

I plan on using wedged, through-mortice and tenons for the construction.

John :D
 

Steve Maskery

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Good looking bandsaw and SOME good working practices.
But rubbish terminology! Finger-joint (AKA dovetail) and T&G (aka bridle joint). Cutting tenons like that is a very poor technique, especially the way he cut the shoulders. Those offcuts can get trapped twixt blade and fence. But it also produces a central tenon, whether you want it to be central or not. You are referencing of two faces, which is bad practice. Someone should introduce him to the Ultimate Bandsaw Tenon Jig. But then I would sasy that, wouldn't I?
I'll give him his due on the dovetails though. If you can cut that accurately by eye, then it is a fast technique. My method, which is a development of Mark Duginski's, is a bit more silly person-proof.
S
 

Bluekingfisher

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I had the sound muted (Boss would wonder what I was watching) so could not here his commentary.

If you are refering to Mark Duginski's "How to master woodworking machines" I very recently bought the DVD and only watched it once very briefly all the way through. Again lots of useful, simple and well thought out methods of work for woodworkers.

If memory serves, his method was removable finger blocks to reference the dovetail joints. Also liked the tip with the post-it notes as shims - must try that one too.
 

Steve Maskery

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Yes, that's the basis of it, although my reference is from his "The Bandsaw Book". I've developed it somewhat, but it's the same principle.
S
 

Bluekingfisher

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Yes, I have the book too, one day, perhaps when I retire I will have the chance to sit down and read through it properly.

I have watched several of your tips online too, again, well thought out simple to make jigs, which work (which for me is great). It's very helpfull when people like yourself share what you have learned through your own trial and errors. Not trying to seek favour with you, however since finding this forum I have always had a response to my queries from woodworkers more experienced than myself and that I find very humbling and reassuring. Keep up the good work.
 
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