• We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

How To Edge Joint

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

CHJ

Established Member
Joined
31 Dec 2004
Messages
20,130
Reaction score
74
Location
Cotswolds UK
BradNaylor":3nz4madq said:
...
I'm retiring soon though, and giving up my Norm-style workshop. I will be working out of a shed at home with only hand tools - well okay, maybe a bandsaw and router table!

I'm kinda looking forward to regressing to my college days and picking up a hand plane again!

..
Welcome back Brad, 'long time no see' hope you enjoy the increased leisure time on the horizon.
 

David Martin

Member
Joined
10 May 2020
Messages
13
Reaction score
0
Location
Redcar
Fantastic post Custard. Thanks for the effort you've taken to make such a clear and informative tutorial.

The clamps I use are pretty poor quality so the D-shaped blocks trick is something I've used quite a bit. I usually make these by splitting 1" thick dowel rod in half with the band saw and chopping to 3" lengths. I always seem to need to make more each time I need them though... I think there are wood eating faeries living in my garage :roll:
 

Democritus

Established Member
UKW Supporter
Joined
8 Jun 2020
Messages
249
Reaction score
70
Location
Ramsbottom
Custard, can you please comment on a technique I use that you have not mentioned?
What I do is to put 2 boards side by side in the vice, and plane the 2 together. Then if I don't plane at exactly 90 degrees it doesn't matter because the error on one board has an exactly compensating error on the other board. I still try to plane at 90 degrees but don't worry too much about it, so long as I am somewhere near. I find this quicker, partly because I don't spend time getting to exactly 90 degrees and partly because I plane 2 boards at the same time.
The late, great, Charles Hayward recommended this technique for edge jointing. When jointing 3 or more boards, you had to ensure the mating planed surfaces were marked very carefully, or you could end up in a real mess.
This was largely, of course, in the days when most such joints were hand planed, certainly by amateur cabinet makers.
Great thread, Custard.
D.
 

Hornbeam

Established Member
Joined
21 Mar 2017
Messages
632
Reaction score
162
Location
Cheshire
Putting 2 boards back to back and planing them together can work but if you have a cambered blade you will get a slight misalignment. Generally works Ok for thin boards but not for thicker ones
Ian
 

Democritus

Established Member
UKW Supporter
Joined
8 Jun 2020
Messages
249
Reaction score
70
Location
Ramsbottom
Ian, I think you’re right, but I have successfully edged jointed boards for cabinet tops, carcass sides etc, up to about 3/4 inch thick using this method, sometimes simply rubbed, sometimes dowelled. I found it easier with the thicker boards than the thin. I have never done it with anything thicker than about 3/4 inch, but I can see that it might be problematic.
I have always been an amateur cabinet maker, using mainly hand tool methods, but I haven’t done any cabinet work for nearly ten years because I no longer have the energy to hand plane large boards etc anymore. I have taken up woodturning instead, where the energy is supplied by the lathe.
D.
 
Last edited:
Top