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How do I protect my spare tools from rust?

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heimlaga

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Hello.

I am in the process of buying a combi machine and in order to find room for it in my cramped shop I must move my spare hand tools out onto an unheated attic. How do I prevent old saws and planes and chisels from rusting? Some are cleaned while some are rusty from before but there must be some way to mummify them for long term storage.

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bosshogg

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Polish them, dip them in melted wax and allow to dry before storage. You can easily remove wax when required, candle wax is a good choice...bosshogg :)
Imagination is more important than knowledge...
Albert Einstein (hammer)
 

plover22

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In the winter my workshop can leave moisture on all my tools, especially big cold items like the lathes and milling and drilling machines.

I dissolve machine oil in white spirit approx 20 to 1 and put it in a hand sprayer, when I have finished with a tool I mist it lightly, the white spirit coats the entire surface and then evaporates leaving a very thin film of oil on the surface, the advantage of this is that when I need a tool a quick wipe with a rag moistened in white spirit removes the oil film easily.

Regards

Plover
 

heimlaga

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I am unlikely to need theese tools in the next 10 years but want to keep them.
Candle wax sounds good but I do not have time to start cleaning some 20 rusty saws and some houndred rusty chisels. Engine oil would impregnate all handles over time.

What about that drying oil prodyct that is used to treat cavities in car bodies?
 

Harbo

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I'd be tempted to soak them in phosphoric acid ( I use Agricultural Milk Stone Remover as a cheap source) which kills the rust and forms a protective coat.
Spray them with that wax ( Waxoil - that brings back memories?) and seal them in plastic bags.

Rod
 

mbartlett99

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Wow, pretty old school round here. Could just buy a can of Boeshield or Lanacote and have done with it - works well for salt spray so should be just about able to cope with a little moisture. Leaves a waxy soft coat which is easily wiped off.
 

AndyT

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I've not used them myself (don't need to) but a solution often mentioned on here is the corrosion inhibitor pots sold by Workshop Heaven (Toolguard VCI) - put all your tools in a big box with one or two of these and get no new rust.

Details here.
 

CHJ

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If I was storing a whole bunch of tools and equipment in a concentrated location like that I would arrange some form of enclosure such as canvas, plastic sheeting or a cheap throw and mount a very low level heat source in the base area, all you need to do is keep any metal surfaces a couple of degrees above the dew point of the surrounding air.

A 7-9 watt long life low energy bulb on 24/7 should be enough and will not make too much of a dent in the electricity bill, this is how all my machine tools are stored, only they are in old kitchen draws and cabinets but they feel warm to the touch whenever taken out for use. Years ago before the advent of the long life bulbs I used a small 12volt transformer and a car side light bulb, heat from bulb and waste heat from transformer were always more than enough.
 

SteveB43

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Hi
I wrapped my tools in some VCI paper, there are a few suppliers that will sell you a few sheets, othere wise club together and buy a roll, all 200M of it....
It would be a lifetime's supply.... :D
 

heimlaga

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Those products are hard to find in Finland.

I live in a place where winter temperatures may drop to -40 degrees celsius and regularly stay at -20 for days and weeks and sometimes months at a time so enclosing and heating is not an option.

I have already treated half the lot with Tectyl ML. That is a wax for cavities in car bodies. I hope it will be absorbed in the thin rust on som of the tools and prevent the rust from going any further. It surly will keep the rust away from bright surfaces and disolves easily in mineral spirit.
 

Blister

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When the wife is out shopping

Slide them under the bed :lol:
 

Blister

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heimlaga":hbn2kg74 said:
Then I'd have to find a wife first. That makes for a very complicated process :D

Even easier then , use the other half of the bed :mrgreen:
 

OldSchoolTools

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a cheap way to protect saws is to use linseed oil works well but does leave a yellow film, but if your not going to use them it will protect them.
 

Shrubby

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Hello
I've had tools in which are rarely used, they go into an airtight box with 250g bags of Silica desiccant. No other chemicals used and no rust
Matt
 

custard

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mbartlett99":l2zidphz said:
Wow, pretty old school round here. Could just buy a can of Boeshield or Lanacote and have done with it - works well for salt spray so should be just about able to cope with a little moisture. Leaves a waxy soft coat which is easily wiped off.
Another vote for Lanacote, but maybe it's a boaty thing because I only ever see it in ships chandlers?
 

Vann

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CHJ":3o3wk6jp said:
A 7-9 watt long life low energy bulb on 24/7 should be enough and will not make too much of a dent in the electricity bill...
Surely Chas, a low energy bulb is the wrong sort to use? A low energy bulb turns most of those 7-9 watts into light, and only a little into heat.

What you want is a good old inefficient 7-9 watt incandescent bulb that'll turn most of those 7-9 watts into heat. It's the heat that'll keep the rust away. Light will only enable you to see the rust forming... (hammer)

Cheers, Vann.
 

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