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How do I create a cupboard door like this?

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uziwood786

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Hey guys,

Relatively new to wood working so please excuse the elementary nature of the question. Looking to make this shoe cupboard, But I can't figure out a) How they got those outwood parts of the wood to protrude, what tool was used? Secondly, how does one make that invisible joint with those wood panels? Like I said i'm very new so excuse my ignorance, but would really appreciate some help. Many thanks!
 

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Ttrees

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Hello and welcome.
I made a big long post and it all disappeared, had some talk about stanley bailey/record planes on ebay, should get a no.4 for no more than £25. look on toolitique for rough guides, probably at the very least a 50% mark up compared.
You need to be able to get your stock precisely flat and square.

ITS Ultex/Vaunt hones for a tenner a plate when on discount (often)
Marking equipment like a soba 150mm engineers square for a tenner at axminster tools, and whilst shopping there, a wheel gauge would be nice to have also, if a bit fancy.
A fairly long stainless rule would be nice, if you find one local for a tenner.

What about a car boot sale, you would get near everything you need for a few quid if yer lucky, vices (heavy postage costs)
a few rusty planes which are also heavy and will crack if dropped,
nice chisels, even though near anything would be OK , old oil stones, some are very sought after like pike mine lilly white washita, and a grubby old stone can be bought for a pound.



You might find watching a video or two on frame and panel construction
will describe all you need to know.
You could join with dowels, biscuits, dominos or the more traditional
mortise and tenon or loose tongues if you prefer.
I'd expect you might find Rob Cosman or Matt Estlea would have a heap of videos on the traditional methods or construction.


If you watch those, then also have a look at Franks workbench for some sanity if you're thinking all that fancy kit.
Much of it is snake oil peddling.

This new channel looks to be the real deal from what I've watched.
No highly edited stuff, just basic tools with a good understanding on how to use them well.

Have you got a bench, I'd think you'd be in for a frustrating time if you don't have one.
I'd sooner go Japanese than rely on a workmate.

I'll stop writing now, before I delete all my post.
Tom
 
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Inspector

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Hey guys,

.....a) How they got those outwood parts of the wood to protrude, what tool was used?.....
Those are called beads and they can be made with special hand planes, scratch stock, or router bits.

An example of the type of special plane. There are other planes that are cheaper or simpler.

An example of a scratch stock (these can be very simple and made of wood yourself) and blades.

An example of beading router bits. You would only cut the edge facing you.

Pete
 

TRITON

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As above, corner bead router cutter.

But it should be noted that profile was cut with the router set in a table as its on the edge.

But anything can be used, any shape or design I mean, and even just a simple V cut in 6 or so millimeters from the edge will accentuate it.

A scratch stock.
You can buy these or make them, or even adapt an old marking gauge
As you can see in this vid, its is effectively the same as a marking gauge, so a marking gauge can be adapted without doing any of the work in the vid to making one. It is only the slot for the blade you need create, the blade itself, which can be made from any bit of thin flat steel, such as part of a hacksaw blade, and ground or filed, and a method to hold the blade securely, as shown in the vid.

If you watch the vid on YT, you'll get other links to blade making etc.
 

thetyreman

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this is the tool I use to do beading in solid woods


also you can use different size steel flathead screws for different size beads, as long as the hole is drilled straight and parallel for the screw it works very well.

Alternatively just use a power router with a beading cutter.
 

uziwood786

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Hello and welcome.
I made a big long post and it all disappeared, had some talk about stanley bailey/record planes on ebay, should get a no.4 for no more than £25. look on toolitique for rough guides, probably at the very least a 50% mark up compared.
You need to be able to get your stock precisely flat and square.

ITS Ultex/Vaunt hones for a tenner a plate when on discount (often)
Marking equipment like a soba 150mm engineers square for a tenner at axminster tools, and whilst shopping there, a wheel gauge would be nice to have also, if a bit fancy.
A fairly long stainless rule would be nice, if you find one local for a tenner.

What about a car boot sale, you would get near everything you need for a few quid if yer lucky, vices (heavy postage costs)
a few rusty planes which are also heavy and will crack if dropped,
nice chisels, even though near anything would be OK , old oil stones, some are very sought after like pike mine lilly white washita, and a grubby old stone can be bought for a pound.



You might find watching a video or two on frame and panel construction
will describe all you need to know.
You could join with dowels, biscuits, dominos or the more traditional
mortise and tenon or loose tongues if you prefer.
I'd expect you might find Rob Cosman or Matt Estlea would have a heap of videos on the traditional methods or construction.


If you watch those, then also have a look at Franks workbench for some sanity if you're thinking all that fancy kit.
Much of it is snake oil peddling.

This new channel looks to be the real deal from what I've watched.
No highly edited stuff, just basic tools with a good understanding on how to use them well.

Have you got a bench, I'd think you'd be in for a frustrating time if you don't have one.
I'd sooner go Japanese than rely on a workmate.

I'll stop writing now, before I delete all my post.
Tom
Thanks so much for your reply! So i'm all loaded up on the best Makita's impact driver, combi drill, circular saw, the usual. My first project is actually a workbench, and i'm making it fancier and stronger than it needs to be, as a means to be able to learn some of the more complex joining techniques. I think a biscuit joint for this would be sufficient as it does need to be mega strong. Appreciate the effort of re-writing after it was all deleted!
 

uziwood786

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As above, corner bead router cutter.

But it should be noted that profile was cut with the router set in a table as its on the edge.

But anything can be used, any shape or design I mean, and even just a simple V cut in 6 or so millimeters from the edge will accentuate it.

A scratch stock.
You can buy these or make them, or even adapt an old marking gauge
As you can see in this vid, its is effectively the same as a marking gauge, so a marking gauge can be adapted without doing any of the work in the vid to making one. It is only the slot for the blade you need create, the blade itself, which can be made from any bit of thin flat steel, such as part of a hacksaw blade, and ground or filed, and a method to hold the blade securely, as shown in the vid.

If you watch the vid on YT, you'll get other links to blade making etc.


Thanks so much for replying, question, at what stage would i bead the edges? I'm before I put all the panels in right?
 

Ttrees

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I'll admit I don't have much knowledge with biscuits, but
if it's a door for an underbench cabinet, then I would look into something stronger, if you're ever going to clamp something to it.

Tom
 

uziwood786

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this is the tool I use to do beading in solid woods


also you can use different size steel flathead screws for different size beads, as long as the hole is drilled straight and parallel for the screw it works very well.

Alternatively just use a power router with a beading cutter.
Hey,

Thanks for posting, I really want to go down the router route for the sake of learning how to use the tool, but i'm confused as to which particular router bit I would use for the simple beading cut I need to make in the image above, all the router bits i've seen cut in two places which I don't want, any thoughts?
 

Inspector

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You use a router table and fence. The bit is vertical with just the cutting part you want above the table and the part of the bit you don't want below the table. The board is passed by the bit on edge with the face against the table.

Pete

Added
Biscuits can be quite strong with mortice and tenon / loose tenons being stronger. I made an Oak screen door using biscuits and I went through it every day with the door slamming behind me for 25 years. The only reason I took it off was to bring it here when I moved.
 
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TRITON

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Thanks so much for replying, question, at what stage would i bead the edges? I'm before I put all the panels in right?
Probably better addingthe bead while the timber is square, but in truth if its being biscuited it wont really matter.

I see you've bought yourself a circular saw. I strongly suggest you watch a good deal of safety vids on your tube before using it, as it is an extremely dangerous tool, and should always be A treated with care and concentration, and B, be aware there are do's and donts.
One of the donts that can or does cause serious injury is when the operator curls their fingers on the board they are cutting while holding it, and the underside of the protruding blade neatly cuts them off.

The saw has a depth gauge, and the saw shouldnt be protruding any more than about 5mm through the other side of whatever you are cutting if the piece being cut off is overhanging. If youre cutting it on a table a few mm is fine, but you dont want to have more than the thickness of the workpiece+5mm at any time.
The saw has two handles. Use both until you have used it for a fair while. Be aware of kickbacks, where the blade binds and the action and direction the blade is turning causes it to be driven backwards out of the cut and towards you.
A jigsaw on a straight edge is just as accurate and considerably safer.
 

owen

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Hey,

Thanks for posting, I really want to go down the router route for the sake of learning how to use the tool, but i'm confused as to which particular router bit I would use for the simple beading cut I need to make in the image above, all the router bits i've seen cut in two places which I don't want, any thoughts?

Pick your collet size and the size of bead you want and away you go.
I've used them freehand in a router and aslong as you have a nice wide flat edge to run them across they've been fine. Might be worth clamping a piece of timber across the top edge to give your router base more support as you cut it
 

uziwood786

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Probably better addingthe bead while the timber is square, but in truth if its being biscuited it wont really matter.

I see you've bought yourself a circular saw. I strongly suggest you watch a good deal of safety vids on your tube before using it, as it is an extremely dangerous tool, and should always be A treated with care and concentration, and B, be aware there are do's and donts.
One of the donts that can or does cause serious injury is when the operator curls their fingers on the board they are cutting while holding it, and the underside of the protruding blade neatly cuts them off.

The saw has a depth gauge, and the saw shouldnt be protruding any more than about 5mm through the other side of whatever you are cutting if the piece being cut off is overhanging. If youre cutting it on a table a few mm is fine, but you dont want to have more than the thickness of the workpiece+5mm at any time.
The saw has two handles. Use both until you have used it for a fair while. Be aware of kickbacks, where the blade binds and the action and direction the blade is turning causes it to be driven backwards out of the cut and towards you.
A jigsaw on a straight edge is just as accurate and considerably safer.

Thanks for the tips, invaluable advice which i'll definitely be implementing.
 

uziwood786

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You use a router table and fence. The bit is vertical with just the cutting part you want above the table and the part of the bit you don't want below the table. The board is passed by the bit on edge with the face against the table.

Pete

Added
Biscuits can be quite strong with mortice and tenon / loose tenons being stronger. I made an Oak screen door using biscuits and I went through it every day with the door slamming behind me for 25 years. The only reason I took it off was to bring it here when I moved.
Thanks very much Pete that makes sense, lastly, what would be my best options of wood to create something like this, what do the big companies use?
 

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Are you looking to paint the unit when complete or leave it natural wood colour?

MDF is quite widely used for things like this, MR MDF is a bit better then normal MDF - and its not as expensive as buying lots of timber

Plus, if its one of your first projects, you could ask the place you buy the timber from to do some of the cuts for you

Things like the sides, and maybe even get them to rip lengths of the material needed to make the slats in the doors, and then you cut them down to final length - they will get a perfectly straight cut so all are the same width, and then you just need to worry about the length of each piece

Do you have a mitre saw you could use or just the circular saw for your wood cuts?
 

uziwood786

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Are you looking to paint the unit when complete or leave it natural wood colour?

MDF is quite widely used for things like this, MR MDF is a bit better then normal MDF - and its not as expensive as buying lots of timber

Plus, if its one of your first projects, you could ask the place you buy the timber from to do some of the cuts for you

Things like the sides, and maybe even get them to rip lengths of the material needed to make the slats in the doors, and then you cut them down to final length - they will get a perfectly straight cut so all are the same width, and then you just need to worry about the length of each piece

Do you have a mitre saw you could use or just the circular saw for your wood cuts?
Will definitely paint it/stain it (not sure which term to use) and I will be going to a workshop where they have everything including the mitre saw so i'll be using that where I can. I did think about MDF but I wanted a nice wood grain look to it.
 
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