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Hi, and, I want a bench sander but....

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Grahamshed

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Hello everyone. First post and a question if you will.

I want a bench sander and know that many come with a disc and belt..... but which would you use for what ? Why do you need both ?
Do they have any particular advantage over clamping a belt sander to the bench ?
 

RogerP

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Welcome to the forum :)

The belt would be used mainly along the grain and the disk for end grain. Of course there are many different situations and needs but that is crudely the difference. The advantage over a clamped hand belt sander is that they are much more convenient, much quieter and usually with larger sanding area.
 

marcros

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is it the case where the combined disc and belt sanders tend to be a compromise with neither running at ideal speed?
 

RogerP

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marcros":2v0z4vbl said:
is it the case where the combined disc and belt sanders tend to be a compromise with neither running at ideal speed?
Not too sure on that. Mine seems to have about the right belt speed and the disc (is it geared?) - running much faster which also seems okay.
 

davem62

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hi graham and welcome,
rodger doesn't say what make his sander is but i have the small charnwood one w508 and that also has 2 different speeds with the disc running a lot faster than the belt.
hth dave
 

Grahamshed

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Thanks guys. I hadn't thought about the with and against the grain aspect. Still it seems to me that the belt sander would be more useful if it were tipped on its side rather than laying the wood on top of it. no ?
 

RogerP

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Grahamshed":3oa3wtz6 said:
Thanks guys. I hadn't thought about the with and against the grain aspect. Still it seems to me that the belt sander would be more useful if it were tipped on its side rather than laying the wood on top of it. no ?
No :)

There's a fence to run the board against when doing edges if that's what was worrying you.
 

theartfulbodger

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Grahamshed":xts5qnky said:
..it seems to me that the belt sander would be more useful if it were tipped on its side rather than laying the wood on top of it..

Some belt/disc sanders have a facility to raise the belt up through 90 degrees to the vertical and then move the table from the disc to the bottom of the now-vertical belt.

:)
 

kinsella

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Hi Graham
I too started with a belt sander in a vice, then i also had a circular piece of MDF fixed to the lathe with sandpaper glued to it. They both did the same job as a purpuse built machine, but i ended up buying the Axminster Perform range of belt and disk sander. More out of convenience and that it has all the guide and mitre gauge. You get consistant results, as opposed to standing over a belt sander which is upside down in a vice.

Ps. Mine is the loudest bit of kit i have. It works fine, but is just very loud when running.
 

wcndave

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I have a cheap one like this.


I tend to wish also it was on it's side and had a table... I have looked at theseon axminster etc, and they seem to be called linishers?

They are more expensive of course. Tbh i rarely use the belt part, and if i did buy again would get a much larger disc only version, or a proper one like this which costs 900 http://www.axminster.co.uk/jet-jet-oes- ... rod365614/

I also find the belt part on mine is just not flat. I occaisonally use for very rough work indeed.
 

jimi43

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A disc sander is probably the simplest bit of kit you can make yourself with a motor, some MDF and abrasive sheets and spray glue.



This is one of the "most used" bits of kit in my workshop...old lathe motor with belt change for speed and dust extraction from a wet/dry vac.

I also made a wee one for more delicate work from an old tile cutter found at a booffair for a few quid...induction motor...quiet as a mouse and super accurate...



I took all the rubbish and cutting disc off the front...fitted an MDF disc with abrasive attached...



...and made a sliding top to clear out all the dust that doesn't get picked up by the vac.

Now....for belt sanders...mmm....kinsella....you think yours is loud...



You start this old Yankee job up and half the national grid drops a few volts!! :mrgreen:



But boy is it good! And now I have a fence to stop my arm being ripped off and the stock being projected into Essex...it is really safe!

(I have since fitted guards by the way!) :mrgreen:

Jim
 

jimi43

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theartfulbodger":2yzq7tob said:
Is it me, or does American kit just look dangerous?

:shock: :shock:
No mate..it's not just you...and in that state..it decidedly was!

I have fitted guards all over and a vertical fence so now it is really safe...but I still have a kill switch to hit! :mrgreen:

It was made in the 40s though or even late 30s I think so I guess it can be excused! Mind you....it probably will last another 80 years!

I don't think you can say that for Homebase! :wink:

Jim
 

Ian down london way

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jimi43 said:
theartfulbodger said:
Is it me, or does American kit just look dangerous?

:shock: :shock:
Newbie here, but I couldn't help but comment.

Respect for all tools with sharp or moving parts, is definitetly in order.
My only significant and hence worst accident was with a belt sander of all things. I've an axminster (something like their AS408, but with a more substantial fence used when the belt is tilted to a full 90 degrees).
I use the belt in preference to the disc - less aggressive, and easier to sand larger items without being drawn to the side. Anywa, I make intricate stuff - like all wooden clocks (plans from a great guy in Hawaii) and I was sanding the end of a small bit of wood, when it flipped up and shot down between the belt and the table. unfortunately, my finger followed. I think about 100ms later, my nail had been filed down to almost the quick, taking a slice of the flesh away that had been under the nail and there was a pretty red line all the way around the sanding belt. Six months before I could type with that finger.
 

jimi43

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Like every power tool there are certain things you can do with them which are almost guaranteed to end in pain.

One of those is with the disc sander...sanding on the upward side of the disc...easy to do which is why they put a guard on that side now.

Small bits being trapped down between the disc or belt and the fence is a major hazard. Easily sorted by not sanding small bits near the fence. :wink:

The little Walker Driver above would take your fingernail...your finger...your hand...your arm and half of the workshop with it if you made that mistake so I sort of treat it with respect. Zero tolerance fences are a must.

Jim
 
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