• We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Heritage putty

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

HOJ

Established Member
Joined
21 Oct 2014
Messages
364
Reaction score
14
Location
South Norfolk
Has any one any tips or techniques for using this, I have nearly 50 Heritage 12mm DGU panes to install, trying to decide whether I bead them in or use the Hodgson putty, I have used it before and i remember it was a pain to get it right.
 

Doug71

Established Member
Joined
28 Aug 2016
Messages
2,030
Reaction score
668
Location
Yorkshire
I used it for the first time a few weeks ago and found it difficult, it sticks to everything, I'm sure it's just fix-all in a different tube.

I spent ages doing just 4 panes and wasn't really happy with the result. Some other windows on the same house (small Georgian panes) had been done with beads and I can see why. The beads kind of defeated the whole heritage thing though as it just looked like double glazed units beaded in.

The instructions on Hodgson website do say you can just put a small bead of heritage putty in front of the unit then a fillet of traditional putty over the top which I might try next time.

I remember Trevanion on here suggesting you need to cut the end of the tube quite large so the fillet is practically finished straight from the gun but I didn't manage to make this work.

Good Luck.
 

Trevanion

Greatest Of All Time
Joined
29 Jul 2018
Messages
3,764
Reaction score
561
Location
Pembrokeshire
I haven't used the Hodgsons stuff yet but what I have used is "Timbaglaze" which I imagine is an identical product.

I find it's best not to get greedy with the stuff and only work one pane at a time since it goes off fairly rapidly and becomes impossible to tool in once it gets beyond a point of no return. Like Doug said that I said, you can cut the nozzle quite large and get a decent run straight off the gun with a bit of practice but you'll still need to tidy up the corners, probably a 10x10mm fillet is the largest you'd get away with doing straight off the nozzle.

Did a pair of pretty large chapel windows (5m tall x 1.2 wide) recently with loads of little panes, they opted for beading because puttying them in situ would take days and days, cost a fortune and I wasn't willing to do it :lol:. Made a batch of 8x8mm sticks and then put an 8x8 groove in a piece of wood and fixed it to the table saw fence, plunged through with the blade so that it intersected at 45 degrees diagonally across the bead point-to-point and just shoved the sticks through at one end continuously until I had a pile of beads and off-cuts, flat face got sanded and edges of the beads were razor sharp and just got a very slight knock-off with some sandpaper and they were painted then the windows themselves were glazed. Unless you knew they were beaded you'd struggle to tell but to be fair you couldn't get any closer than 1.5 meters because there was a 12ft trench down a level below the windows.
 

Doug71

Established Member
Joined
28 Aug 2016
Messages
2,030
Reaction score
668
Location
Yorkshire
Trevanion, how do you fasten such small beads in place, do you pin them, if so what pins do you use or do you just stick them in with some kind of adhesive/sealant?
 

Trevanion

Greatest Of All Time
Joined
29 Jul 2018
Messages
3,764
Reaction score
561
Location
Pembrokeshire
Doug71":65i2yivu said:
Trevanion, how do you fasten such small beads in place, do you pin them, if so what pins do you use or do you just stick them in with some kind of adhesive/sealant?
18G would split a small bead like that pretty frequently, especially in Accoya so 23G stainless pins and silicone in this case :)
 

HOJ

Established Member
Joined
21 Oct 2014
Messages
364
Reaction score
14
Location
South Norfolk
Thanks all, I made some 8x8mm square beads up yesterday, but was trying to work out how best to put a slope them, I will take a look at trying your solution Trevanion, but that's not going to work with my Sedgwick TA 450 though! I have a Kity 419 knocking about, so may try that, but will probably need to get a different blade.

I generally use my thicknesser for putting slopes on, running on a carrier board, but beads this small will probably end up in the extractor.

Not looking forward to fitting all these either, but at least most of it will done on the bench
 

toolsntat

Yep, I collect tools and tat
Joined
8 Dec 2007
Messages
1,991
Reaction score
265
Location
Leicestershire England
How we getting on with the Timbaglaze ?
Looking to use some to bed on some Accoya bottom beads then SS pin in.
Really looking for the best product as the original Sapele beads have failed where bedded with caulking? and not helped by the fitters leaving the duct tape around the face of the glass.
Cheers Andy
 

toolsntat

Yep, I collect tools and tat
Joined
8 Dec 2007
Messages
1,991
Reaction score
265
Location
Leicestershire England
Yes the silicone was something I was trying to avoid as this needs painting over.
Also looking to use the tube of Timbaglaze to sort some frame gaps. Does it set solid or give a little?
Cheers Andy
 

Sheffield Tony

Ghost of the disenchanted
Joined
2 Aug 2012
Messages
2,078
Reaction score
89
Location
Bedfordshire
When I made a door with sealed units in, the glass supplier told me not to use putty, but not for compatibility but because it eventually hardens, and the lack of flex can cause the sealed unit to fail. They sold me Flexi-strip (?) which very closely resembles BluTack on a roll ... Silicone might have been easier to use.
 

MikeG.

Established Member
Joined
24 Aug 2008
Messages
10,158
Reaction score
665
Location
Essex/ Suffolk border
Woody2Shoes":3bs7n1ur said:
MikeG.":3bs7n1ur said:
Am I missing something? Why not just use putty?
I think it's to do with possible incompatibility with the sealant in the DGU.

e.g. https://hodgsonsealants.com/wp-content/ ... -sheet.pdf

It seems that it may not be compatible with microporous paint either.

Cheers, W2S
Interesting, because the 4-4-4 slim DGUs used in heritage work are always puttied into place with traditional putty, around here. I'll ask what the story is when I get the chance.
 

Woody2Shoes

Impressive Member
Joined
5 Jan 2015
Messages
2,014
Reaction score
331
Location
Sussex UK
MikeG.":3r5cy4ve said:
Woody2Shoes":3r5cy4ve said:
MikeG.":3r5cy4ve said:
Am I missing something? Why not just use putty?
I think it's to do with possible incompatibility with the sealant in the DGU.

e.g. https://hodgsonsealants.com/wp-content/ ... -sheet.pdf

It seems that it may not be compatible with microporous paint either.

Cheers, W2S
Interesting, because the 4-4-4 slim DGUs used in heritage work are always puttied into place with traditional putty, around here. I'll ask what the story is when I get the chance.
I think that one way round the chemical incompatibility problem is the use of self-adhesive aluminium tape around the edge of the DGU to form a barrier between the two types of gunk - my DGU supplier asks me if I want ali tape or not (I always seem to get it, regardless!).

PS I assume they checked compatibility between the tape adhesive and the DGU gunk!
 

Trevanion

Greatest Of All Time
Joined
29 Jul 2018
Messages
3,764
Reaction score
561
Location
Pembrokeshire
toolsntat":3basgfx6 said:
Also looking to use the tube of Timbaglaze to sort some frame gaps. Does it set solid or give a little?
It's almost identical to acrylic frame sealant in every way but name, it sort of has a rubbery feel to it once dry. Can't see why it wouldn't work.

MikeG.":3basgfx6 said:
Interesting, because the 4-4-4 slim DGUs used in heritage work are always puttied into place with traditional putty, around here. I'll ask what the story is when I get the chance.
Are they actually puttied in or are they bedded and filled around the unit with silicone then allowed to dry and then puttied over? That's what I was instructed to do with the heritage units by the supplier if using genuine LSO putty.
 

HSL Technical

New member
Joined
21 Oct 2020
Messages
2
Reaction score
0
Location
beverley
Any questions you have on glazing or Puttying I am happy to help. Please get in touch if you need

Thanks

Marc
 

LBCarpentry

Established Member
Joined
26 Sep 2012
Messages
498
Reaction score
110
Location
Leicester
Practise practise and more practise. We do a LOT of putting heritage DGU’s. Currently using geocel top gun glazing putty (cost effective) that comes in a tube. But am going to give the hodgsons traditional putty ago next.

Best practise with the tubes, is when cutting the nozzle, cut a large 45 degree angle into it. Then with the correct technique, you can actually gun it straight in at almost the right angle & finish. Then just skim over with a putty knife. Clean off knife after EVERY swipe. It’s very fast once you get used to it and a far better finish than beading.

Ideally you want no deeper than an 8-10mm rebate depth to fill (heritage units available in 12, 14 & 16mm)

Looking forward to giving the hodgsons a go. Especially being able to fully clean up by brushing white chalk over at the end!
 

HOJ

Established Member
Joined
21 Oct 2014
Messages
364
Reaction score
14
Location
South Norfolk
I went for the Hodgson Heritage putty, which my glass supplier specified, we developed a technique that worked very well, first, as has been said, cut the nozzle to an angle and width to suit the rebate, we then used a battery mastic gun to apply, which gave a consistent and smooth feed rate.

We did the opposite sides of a unit at a time, dressed off with a Cramer Fugi silicone profiler to remove any excess, and let it tack dry, which then allowed us to work the the other two sides and corners without spoiling the adjacent side.

My only comment is that its massively more expensive in comparison to the Geocel product that LBC has been using, for what reason i know not.

The other option was to use the Hodgson colour glaze putty which is a hand-applied plastic glazing compound, but takes an extended curing time before it can be over painted.

Results look OK from here:

window.jpg
 
Top