Quantcast

Fitted wardrobes - moisture/ airflow

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

JBD007

Member
Joined
18 Sep 2016
Messages
9
Reaction score
0
Location
Newcastle-under-Lyme, Staffordshire
Hi, I'm building fitted wardrobes in our bedroom with (sealed) mdf carcasses. They are going either side of the chimney breast (which has an air brick). I haven't decided yet whether to run fake doors across the chimney breast and make it look like one big wardrobe.

Anyway, let's say I'm staying with the 2 separate wardrobe plan; I'm not sure whether to completely seal the voids behind the backs of the wardrobes (by running sealant around the edges) to keep any air/ moisture out or put vents in the top and bottom of the backs of the wardrobes to let air flow?

If I do go with plan B should I keep the air brick in?

Any constructive advice/thoughts appreciated.

Cheers, Jim
 

Woody2Shoes

Impressive Member
Joined
5 Jan 2015
Messages
1,526
Reaction score
54
Location
Sussex UK
Are the cupboards backing against an external or internal wall?
PS I would not remove or block the airbrick - how is the flue above capped?
 

JBD007

Member
Joined
18 Sep 2016
Messages
9
Reaction score
0
Location
Newcastle-under-Lyme, Staffordshire
Internal shared partition wall with next door (semi-detached), 1930's brick house. Chimney not capped.

I'm putting in another air brick up higher in the bedroom (front external wall) across the room.
20200930_143520.jpg
 
Last edited:

artie

Sawdust manufacturer.
Joined
12 Jan 2015
Messages
928
Reaction score
89
Location
Norn Iron
Please excuse my ignorance, but what is an air brick?
 

deema

Established Member
Joined
14 Oct 2011
Messages
2,165
Reaction score
24
Location
chester
Brick walls and damp of that era appear to be common without the ability fir them to breath. I would leave at least a 25mm air gap all around. Vertical battens secured to the wall and then the wardrobes is one way if achieving this. If your blanking up to the ceiling a gap on the bottom edge of the blanking piece hidden by the cornice moulding is a solution. Gap hidden on the top of kick board or skirting allows air to flow around.

Paint the back / outside of carcasses against walls with an exterior paint to make them less prone to any condensation that may occur.
 

pe2dave

Established Member
Joined
2 Oct 2007
Messages
273
Reaction score
33
Location
Peterborough, Cambs, UK
Jim, I've had fitted wardrobes in a bedroom for 20 years, no problem with condensation, I'm unclear where you think
the moisture might come from hence why you're considering it?
 

Woody2Shoes

Impressive Member
Joined
5 Jan 2015
Messages
1,526
Reaction score
54
Location
Sussex UK
I wouldn't bother with anything - air gap or anything else - against the internal walls. I'm guessing the external walls are solid 9 inch (one-brick-thick). In my experience, mould can start to grow on external walls where there is 'dead' air e.g. behind a hanging mirror/picture or moveable furniture. One option might be to fix a panel of say 25mm thick Celotex insulation to the inside of the external wall which will be inside your cupboards - and seal round the edges with expanding foam or silicone - the idea being that these new inner surfaces, which will be impermeable to moist air, will not get as cold and therefore be less likely to be a focus of condensation. Cheers, W2S
 

JBD007

Member
Joined
18 Sep 2016
Messages
9
Reaction score
0
Location
Newcastle-under-Lyme, Staffordshire
Yes thanks , I'll install insulation between the external wall and the smaller wardrobe (B). I think I'm also going to incorporate air gaps as suggested by Deema, this takes me back to my original question; it's a balance of trying to keep moisture (air) out v letting it flow around the build.

If I install the fake door section I'm not sure whether I'll block up the current air brick or not; given that I'm putting the new air brick in.

Background; we've lived in the house for 15 years and had the off mould spot on the external wall and in the window - especially at this time of year when there's condensation on the window in the morning (the reason for new air brick which will be higher up the wall than the current one).

Wardrobe B. goes in tomorrow, cheers.
 

Attachments

Rich C

Established Member
Joined
22 Aug 2019
Messages
360
Reaction score
21
Location
Manchester
Is it a solid exterior wall? My house is late 30s and has cavity walls, they were fairly common at the time.
 

Woody2Shoes

Impressive Member
Joined
5 Jan 2015
Messages
1,526
Reaction score
54
Location
Sussex UK
Hi Rich, double skin and insulated before we moved in so how well it was done who knows. Having said that the house warms up quickly and stays warm very well.
In that case I wouldn't bother with any of the precautions we've mentioned at all.
 

Rich C

Established Member
Joined
22 Aug 2019
Messages
360
Reaction score
21
Location
Manchester
In that case I wouldn't bother with any of the precautions we've mentioned at all.
I agree, we have fitted wardrobes and just fitted the outer face directly to the wall. Damp isn't really an issue in the house (except the uncapped chimney).
 

deema

Established Member
Joined
14 Oct 2011
Messages
2,165
Reaction score
24
Location
chester
A chimney has to breath to stop it becoming damp, cold air sinks and needs to be vented. The wall next to the chimney and the chimney wall will both be cold and can unless air circulate create damp. If it were me, I’d allow air to circulate around the wardrobe. It’s no extra work and the walls won’t be straight so you need blanking panels to straighten them up.
If you block up and lift up the air brick you will create damp in the walls beneath the air brick unless it’s open downstairs and can breath.
 
Last edited:

Cabinetman

Established Member
Joined
5 Jan 2017
Messages
539
Reaction score
209
Location
Caistor lincolnshire
Is that to stop noise from outside the house? Or maybe to stop people outside hearing the screams of people you’ve locked in the wardrobe.
 

Latest posts

Top